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October 08, 1950 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-08

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WV

PAOK S~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAYOMTOBR8, 193(O

Yanks Champions Again After

World Series Sweep

Ford Throttles Phillies, 5-2
Berra Ignites N.Y. Power

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

ilini, Spa tans Go
^

Down

TO'

* * *r

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-New York Yankee
pitching and Yankee power sent
the unhappy Whiz Kids from Phil-
adelphia reeling to defeat, 5 to 2,
in the World Series today before
68,098 roaring spectators. The
fourth straight victdry gave the
Yankees their 13th World Cham-
pionship in 17 attempts.
But for an error by outfielder
Gene Woodling with two out in the
ninth inning, Whitey Ford, a 21-
year-old freshman marvel from
the sidewalks of New York, would
have plastered the National League
champs with their second shut-
out of the one-sided playoff.
* * *
THE WONDERFUL kid had to,
be taken out when the next PhilI
singled, and the veteran Allie
Reynolds went in to strike out a
pinch-hitter, Stan Lopata, for the
final out of the series. But the
greatest cheer that rocked the
arena all day accompanied the lit-E
tMe southpaw as he strolled to theE
dugout.r
For eight and two-thirds in-1
nings he had out-pitched three5
Philly hurlers, including Jim C
Konstanty, and had struck outt
seven with an amazing. assort-
ment of stuff. By all availablet
records, Ford is the youngestt
pitcher ever to start a Worldr
Series game, much less win it.(

t'.ialt......:b}°'°,{.,f ................ a:
YOGI BERRA
.. . blasts homer
S * *
gle to left to open the inning. Nor
even when Del Ennis, the next
man, was struck on the right leg
by a Ford fast ball. The cool
youngster had been pitching out
of worse scrapes than that all af-
ternoon.
Dick Sisler, the batting bust of
the series, followed with a hopper
to Gerry Coleman, on which En-
nis was forced at second, and then
Granny Hamner went down swing-
ing at a third strike. It appeared
to be all over when Woodling
trotted over near the left barrier
and got under Seminick's tower-
ing fly.
But, as the crowd gasped in
amazement, the outfielder let it
drop tb the grass two runs dashed
across. Seminick,

Badgers Win
Close Contest
In Rain, 7-6
CHAMPAIGN -(P)-- Fullback
Bob Radcliffe sloshed 31 yards in
a heavy downpour with a pass in-
terception for a touchdown and
John Coatta booted the point for
a Wisconsin 7-6 win over Illinois
yesterday in a Big Ten football'
opener for both teams.
The ill-fated Illini pass by quar-
terback Fred Major was filched by
Radcliffe in the second period, to
erase a 6-0 Illini lead.
* * *
THAT WAS THE ball game, and
a , drenched Memorial Stadium
crowd of 54,230 sat through a
scoreless second half that had
both teams slipping fruitlessly
along the gridiron as though it
were a waxed ballroom.I
Illinois, a ore-touchdown fa-
vorite and a highly regarded
Conference title threat, scored
in the opening quarter as though
it meant business. Thed Iini
counted with an 87 yard drive
capped by Dick Raklovits' one
foot touchdown plunge.
But on the Illini extra point try
the pass from center from Bill
Vohaska was poor and place kick--
er Sam Rebecca had no choice
except to pick the errant ball and
try to run across. He was nailed
on the Wisconsin four.

While Whitey was standing the
Phillies on their collective heads,
his teammates burst loose for the
first time in the four series games
with something resembling the
power for which they are famous.
S *
LED By catcher Yogi Berra, who
got a, home run and a single to
drive in two of their runs, the
Bombers rocked the Phil starter,
Bob Miller, for two runs before he
could retire the second Yank in the
first inning.
Konstanty, making his third
appearance in three days, was
pounded for three more in the
sixth, which Berra led off with
a drive into the right field
stands. These runs turned out
to have been needed, but until
Woodling made his unfortunate
muff of a fly from Andy Semi-
nick's bat at the end the Yanks
appeared to be home so safely
and easily that the contest was
en the dull side.
There was no reason to suppose
that Ford was headed for trouble
in the ninth when Willie Jones, the
Phil third baseman, pumped a sin-

7
1
1
l

BIG TEN HIGHLIGHTS:
Indiana Victors, 20-7,OvrFoedI w
Ovr av~or Iow

By The Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON -Stubby Lou
D'Achille, pass-pitching and end-
running sophomore, quarterback-
ed Indiana University to a 20-7
upset victory over Iowa yesterday
and cracked a five-year-old West-
ern Conference record in the pro-
cess.
One of D'Achille's two scoring
passes, to Bobby Robertson, cover-
ed 91 yards, including Robertson's
66-yard run after he caught it.
* * *
THE OLD 1ECORD on a Big
Ten scoring play was 76 yards, a
pass from Bill Butkovich of Illinois
to Ray Cisczeh on Nov. 18, 1944, al-
so against Iowa.
Iowa's Hawkeyes had set them-
selves up as a Big Ten title threat
with a 20-14 victory over South-
ern California last week.
D'Achille was the priceless in-
gredient added to the Indiana
squad which won only one game
last year and failed to take a West-
ern Conference contest. Robert-
son's running and pass-catching
helped. So did some superior de-
fensive playing by guard Bill
Smith. But the five-foot eight-
inch D'Achille was the boy for
26,000 Hoosier homecoming fans.
Iowa, mainly through the hard
running of fullback Bill Reitch-
ardt and halfback Jerry Faske,
outgained Indiana on the ground,
346 yards to 310. It had 18 first
downs against Indiana's 7.
Against that, D'Achille complet-
ed 8 of the 14 passes for a total
of 214 yards.
Glen Drahn, Iowa's passing star,
completed only 9 of 20 passes for
110 yards and had three inter-
cepted. None of D'Achilles passes
were hauled down by the Hawk-
eyes.
Indiana got all of its touchdowns
in the first half, before Iowa scor-
ed. A 23-yard pass from D'Achille
to Robertson set up Robertson's
6-yard scoring plunge after less
than five minutes of play.
* * *
Buckeyes Romp<

game and Pittsburgh was unable
to move against ,any of them un-
til the last two, minutes when
they staged an 86-yard scoring
march with quarterback Bob
Bestwick . completing. f o u r
straight passes for the touch-
down.
Janowicz starte d his big pitch-
ing spree with a nine-yard touch-
down to right haliback Ray Ham-
ilton after Bestwick fumbled and
tackle Dick Logan recovered for
Ohio State.
In the same petriod he hit end
Tom Watson with a 47-yard scor-
ing toss and just before the period
closed he pitched a six-yard touch-
down pass to end $herwin Gandee.
* * *
NU Sinks Navy
BALTIMORE - Navy was tor-
pedoed by the smashing of Rich
Athan and bombrarded by Dick
Flowers' passing in a 22-0 shel-
lacking dealt out by Northwestern
before 12,000 spectators yesterday.
Athan ripped through for two
touchdowns after teaming with
Dick Alban to tear the Navy line
apart. Quarterback Flowers f lip-
ped atouchdown pass to end Don
Stonesifer and Bob Burson kicked
a field goal for the rout.
* * *
NORTHWESTERN'S supremacy
in its second straight triumph was
never in doubt after the first few
minutes when Navyis best offen-
sive punch petered sout.
The Middies, in absorbing their
second consecutive licking, had.
only two scoring opportunities all
afternoon and the second was late
in the contest against Northwest-
ern subs. Coach Bob Voights start-
ed pulling out his regulars in the
fourth period with a 16-0 lead.
The busy and tireless Athan took
the ball 25 times through Navy's
line to gain 140 yards;. Alban went
12 times for 44. Flowews completed
12 out of 22 passes for 121 yards.
In addition to bottlng up Navy's
ground attack, the :northwestern
defense gave quarterback Bob Zas-
trow a hard time. He completed
only nine out of 26 passing at-
tempts.

)efeat
MSC Beaten
By Maryland
In 34=7_Rout
TerrapinsW
With Late Surge
EAST LANSING-()-A I a t e-
ral-happy Maryland football team,
sparked by its sensational sopho-
more quarterback John Scarbath,i
free-wheeled its way past favoredl
Michigan State yesterday, 34 to 7,'
in a major upset before 39,376
fans.
The tricky play of the under-
rated Maryland Terrapins com-'
pletely outpowered and outpassedl
the bufuddled MSC Spartans, who.
only last week upset mighty Michi-
gan, 14 to 7, and went into the
game ranked as the nation's no. 2
team.
BESIDES the, fancy ball hand-
ling and running of Scarbath, who
scored one of Maryland's touch-
downs on a line plunge, the:victor's
stars included Ed (Mighty Mo)
Modzelewski and Bob (Shoo-Shoo)
Shemonski.
Modzelewski scored once each
in the first and second periods
on line plunges and Shemonski
capped his sparkling line slants
by a 37-yard touchdown run late
in the fourth period.
The only consolation Michiganj
State had was the 67-yard touch-
down run by Spartan halfback
(Sonny) Grandelius early in the
third quarter.
MARYLAND, getting stronger
as the game wore on, poured on;
three touchdowns in the final per--
iod to turn it into startling run-
away after Michigan State had I
been rated behind only Notre
Dame in the Associated Press poll.
Scarbath got one of the last
period markers. Center Pete'La-
dygo made- another-on a'28-yard
run with an intercepted pas and
Shemonski ran 37 yards..on a
reverse for the final touchdown.
Maryland racked up 14 first
downs to Michigan State's eight
and peeled 204 yards with its
smashing ground game against
the Spartans' 140.
The big, fast Maryland line,{
headed by standout guard Bobby
Ward, continually rushed the
Spartan passers while the defen-
sive Maryland backfield smothered
receivers almost completely. Mich-
igan State completed only three
passes for 39 yards.

-}

Good-Bye Baseball,

-Daily-Carlisle Marshall
PUTICH LEAPS FOR AERIAL FROM PETERSON.
Army Rolls Over Penn State;
Blaik's Arm Sparks 41-7 Win

NEW YORK (A)
AB R
Woodling LF 4.1
Rizzuto SS 4 0
Berra C 4 2
DiMaggio CF 3 1
Mize iB 3 0
Hopp IB 1 0
Brown 3B 3 1
W. Johnson 3b 1 0
Bauer RF 3 0
Coleman 2B 3 0
Ford P 3 0
Reynolds P 0 0
TOTALS 32 5

PHILADELPHIA (N)

H
2
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
8

0
4
2
10
1
5
1
0
0
1
2
1
0
27

4
0
4
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
3
0
0
10

Waitkus lB
Ashburn of
Jones 3b
Ennis RF
Sisler LF
K. Johnson
Hamner SS
Seminiek C
Mayo
Goliat 2B
Miller P
Konstanty P
Caballero
Roberts P
Lopata
TOTALS

AB
3
4
4
3
4
0
4
4
0
4
0
2
1
0
1
t4

R
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
1
0
2
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0

0
9
3
0
1
2
0
2
3
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
24

A
1
0
4
0
0
0
4
2
1
0
4
0
1
13

E-Goliat, Brown, Woodling.

I

MINNEAPOLIS - Nebraska's
Cornhuskers, sparked by speedy
and elusive halfback. Bob Rey-
nolds, upset a favored Minnesota
footbal lteam wit ha 32 to 26 tri-
umph today.
Reynolds crossed Minnesota's
goal line twice-once on a fancy
67-yard exhibition of tricky run-
nig. He also contributed import-
ant yardage in ground plays, help-
ed out in the tossing department
of Nebraska's aerial game, and
kicked two points after touch-
down.
Reynolds was outscored but not
outshown, by Minnesota's half
back Ron. (Skip) Engcl. Engel cel-
ebrated his 20th birthiday by scor-
ing three of the flour Gopher
touchdowns.
He took passes for two of them
and plunged over for the other.

WEST POINT-(R)-Sparked by
Bobby Blaik's flashy passing, the
1950 Army football team began to
look like its mighty predecessors
yesterday as it handed Penn State
a 41 to 7 trimming in jam-packed
Michie Stadium.
Uncertain on offense at the out-
set and hampered by numerous
penalties Army caught fire and
turned in two sensational scoring
plays at the finish to turn a tough
game into a rout.
. *w*" *
BUT UNTIL those last few min-
utes, it looked to the 26,252 fans
as if Army didn't have much more
than Blaik's throwing arm and a
cast iron defense.
The defense twice stopped the
white-clad Nittany Lions from
Pennsylvania close to the goal in
the first quarter and coach Earl
Blaik's talented son threw two
touchdown passes to captain Dan
Foldberg inrthesecond period.
It was a hard, game up to that
point.
Army rolled up two more touch-
downs in the third quarter with
Gil Stephenson and Gene Filip-
ski scoring, but its attack still
wasn't consistent.
* * *
WHILE THE Cadets got togeth-
er for two long marches, the sec-
ond featured by Al Pollard's 34-
yard run, they were turned back
near the goal on another occasion
and kept getting in trouble
through repeated rules infractions.
They virtually gave Penn State
- I

its touchdown, drawing two 15-
yard penalties after a fumbled
punt had given State the ball at
midfield. Bill Mathers recovered
when Walter Walker dropped
Vince O'Bara's kick. The 'two
penalties for roughness and one
completed pass put the ball on
the two yard line and Tony Or-
sini charged over.
In the remaining minutes, Army
scored as if it was running signal
practice. Carl Guess ran the kick-
off back 31 yards, Stephenson went
20 and Jack Martin swung around
end and traveled the last 40 on a
beautiful run.
Shortly afterward Penn State
kicked to the Army forty and a
pass from Gibby Reich to Vic Pol-
lock ; carried the ball right back
sixty yards for the final score.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)
Russian Club: First meeting,
8 p.m., Mon., Oct. 9, International
Center. Election of officers and
discussion 'of activities for the
coming semester.
Le Cercle Francais: First meet-
ing, Mon., Oct. 9, 8 p.m., League.
Election of President and talk by
Prof. Charles E. Koella. All stu-
dents eligible, including freshmen.
Chess Club: Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Tues., Oct. 10, Room 3D, Union.
Last chance to sign up for all-
campus tournament. Everyone in-
vited. If unable to attend call
Smale, 8528.,

ics and Motion Pictures are sched-
uled for the 1950-51 Lecture Cours
which offers a special rate of $2
for students for the comple
course. Opening the series Oct.
18, David Lilienthal will speak on
"The Atom in Peace and War.
Other attractions include Charles
Laughton, Lowell Thomas, Jr.,
William Laurence, Bennett CerfV
John Mason Brown and Julien
Bryan. Tickets are on sale at the
box office, Hill Auditorium.
Naval Research Reserve Unit:
Meeting to discuss membership ap-
plication, Mon., Oct. 9, 7:30 p.m.,
18 Angell Hall. Naval Reserves
personnel, both faculty and grad-
uate students engaged in research
in the sciences and engineering,
and also Army and Air Force in'
some circumstances, are eligible
for membership. All Interested, in-
cluding Waves; invited to meeting.
Michigan Education Club: Tues.,
Oct. 10, 7:15 p.m., Union. Get-ac-
quainted meeting open to ell stu-
dents interested in the teaching
profession.

N

Your LChance
ALL ARMY GAME
PLANE OR TRAIN
RESERVATIONS
Must be picked up
MONDAY IS THE LAST DAY
tone s cT Ie (i l V

Deutscher Verein: Meeting, on
Tues., Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m., Room
3-G, Union. Students and faculty.
members invited.
La p'tite- causette: Mon., Oct. 9,
3:30 p.m., League.
Dramatic Program, Current Top-

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