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October 06, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRJD

LI

Clips

Whiz

Kids

in

Tenth

With

Homer

by Vic Raschi in the 1-0 opener,
hadn't scored a series run in 13
innings until they finally moved
Mike Goliat home in the fifth.
It was their first series run, in
fact, since their last series ap-
pearance in 1915.
Goliat singled on a bouncer to-
ward second that Coleman had no
license to stop. The Yank second
baseman made a sensational play
to knock down the ball but threw
wildly to first with no chance to
get the runner. Fine back-up work
by Yogi Berra kept Goliat on first
base.
TRYING TO BUNT him over,
Roberts popped to Reynolds but
Eddie Waitkus moved Goliat all
the way to third with a bad hop
single over Coleman's head into
short right field. The ball skidded
off the edge of the infield grass,
and careened, wildly over Cole-
man's head for a single.
Ashburn tied it up with a fly
to Gene Woodling, so deep that
there was no chance for a play
on Goliat at the plate.
Two fine double plays, the first
of the series, stifled Phillie threats
in the eighth and ninth inning.
* * *
THE YANKS blew a chance to
knock off the Phils earlier when
Bobby Brown and Hank Bauer
singled with one out in the eighth.
Roberts bore down to get Cole-
man on an infield bouncer to
Hamner, the first Phil assist, and
retired Reynolds on a called third
strike.
The Phils tore into Reynolds
for four extra base hits after
being held to two lonely singles
by Raschi in the opener. Ham-
ner collected a triple and double
and Waitkus and Ashburn both
doubled.
Fans leaving the ball, park for-
got to look back. It may have
been the last time they walked
out of a World Series game at
this park until next year. Bob
Carpenter, the Phillies' Head, is

Blocking, Punting Stressed
In Wolverine Light Practice
Michigan ran through a light practice yesterday afternoon with
Chuck Ortmann in uniform, but still confined to limbering up on
the sidelines. Don Peterson worked with the first string bacwfield inj
Ortmann's slot as the team worked on blocking and punting for the
most part.
Michigan's varsity was in high spirits as it ran through its block-
ing drill. The blocking, which was weak- in spots last Saturday,
showed considerable improvement

JOE DIMAGGIO
S. .the old pro.
* * *
not likely to agree . . . But the
undeniable truth is this. Guys
who don't hit don't win ball games.
"HECK," LAUGHED Joe Di-
Maggio after he hit his mighty
10th inning home run that gave
the New York Yankees the 2-1
victory ove rthe Phillie today, "It
was getting awful monotonous
popping up all the time."
However, DiMaggio and right-
hander Robin Roberts, his vic-
tim, differed on what kind of a
pitch he hit.
"It was a low inside slider,
about knee high," said Joe. "It
wasn't a good pitch. I don't know
but what it might have been call-
ed a ball."
"IT WAS A fast ball, belt high,"
said Roberts. "I had to challenge
him with a fast one. I was behind
two balls and one strike."
"It'd say this gave me about as
good a thrill as any," he said. "It's
always a thrill to hit one out of
the park. That Roberts is a good
pitcher He has to be good to win
20 games. I'd say his fast ball
and slider were his best pitches.
His curve wasn't too good. He had
fine control, too."
DiMaggio said it was the first
time he had ever broken up a
World Series game with a homer.
Up to the fatal tenth, DiMaggio
had popped out four times.

* * *
LEO KOCESKI, who is expected
to do theemajority of the punting
Saturday with Ortmann sidelined,
and Peterson, did the kicking.
Both got away numerous long
punts during the session.
Pass defense came in for its
share of attention with Harry
Stuhldreher, Jr., Michigan's in-
eligible sophomore, impersonat-
ing John Clayton, Dartmouth's
outstanding passer.
Koceski and Peterson played at
the defensive halves, while Lowell
Perry filled the safety slot. Frank
Howell and Don Dufek saw some
action on defense at the halfback
positions. The defensive lines
worked on rushing the opposing
punters.

Top Honors
To Tarheel
CHAP.EL HILL, N. C.-(V)-Irv
Holdash, North Carolina's line-
backing center has been selected
lineman of the week for his out-
standing play against Notre Dame.
Holdash, 200-pound senior from
Youngstown, Ohio, and Tar Heel
captain, won such acclaim for his
play in North Carolina's 14-7 de-
feat by the Irish that he was an
overwhelming choice in an As-
sociated Press poll for the line-
man of the week of the 1950 foot-
ball season.

Robin Jolted

NEW YORK
Woodling lf
Rizzuto ss
Berra c
DiMaggio cf
Mize lb
Johnson 3b
Brown 3b
Hopp lb
Bauer rf
Coleman 2b
Reynolds p
TOTALS

FIRST IN SIX YEARS:
Ivy League Foe Recalls Tradition

A

B R H O A PHILADELF
5 0 2 2 0
4 0 0 2 1 Waitkus lb
Ashburn cf
50 1 7 0 SislerlIf
5 1 1 3 0 Ennis rf
4 0 1 6 0 Jones 3b
1 0 0 0 2 Hamner ss
Seminick c
4 0 2 0 0 a-Caballero
1 0 0 3 0 Silvestri c
b-Whitman
5 0 1 1 0 Lopata c
3 1 1 5 6 Goliat 2b
Roberts p
3 0 1 1 2 c-Mayo
0 2 10 30 11 TOTALS

PHIA
AB
4
5
5
4
4
3
2
0
0
0
10
4
2
0
33

R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1

H
2
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
7

OA
8 0
4 0
3 0
1 0
3 0
2 2
5 0
0 0
1. 0
0 0
10
2 2.
0 0
0 0
30 4

By BILL BRENTON
Associate Sports Editor
In their own little way, Dart-
mouth's Indians will be out to
rewrite the book tomorrow on the
sod of Michigan's huge football
stadun
Every American history student
is familiar with the thesis that
the virility and ambition of the
United States has moved westward
as time passed.
WHAT HAS BEEN true in poli-
tics, art and other phases of
American life also holds on the
gridiron.
In the late 19th and early 20th
centuries, the big three (Har-
vard, Yale and Princeton) was
the football pride of the nation.
These were Joined by Cornell,
Dartmouth, Brown, Pennsyl-
vania and Columbia to form the
country's most powerful football
circuit-the Ivy League.
It was Ivy League teams that
drew the crowds; it was Ivy League
players that monopolized Walter
Camp's first All-American squads,
and it was Ivy League clubs that
trounced Michigan gridders in 25
out of 34 pre-1930 games.
TOMORROW, Dartmouth pro-
vides Michigan with its first Ivy
League opposition in six years.
But the visit of an eastern
club to the midwest is a far
cry from earlier days as the Big
Green hopes to take home its
league's first win over Michigan
since 1936.
The Wolverines in 20 years of
grid history have added insult to
injury in helping show eastern
football the way out. Wolverine
teams have beaten the "big" eight
17 times since 1930 while losing
but once. The Maize and Blue have
won five in a row in the last 10
years.
* . .
PENNSYLVANIA'S Quakers
were the last Ivy League victor
and victim in battles with Michi-
gan teams. The Penn-men won 27-
7 in 1936, and bowed, 41-19, in
1944.
Dartmouth had no part of
either running up the impressive
record against Michigan or
watching it collapse, but they
bring a young, fast and inspired
crew to Ann Arbor when the
argument continues. Oddly
enough, the overall record of
Michigan and her Ivy League
opponents is all even-26-26.
And it will be up to Dartmouth
who-had nothing to say in set-
ting the record, tq cast the big
vote.
Coach "Tuss" McLaughry's boys
won't be all tradition when they
take the gridiron.
The Indians have one of the
nation's top passers in veteran
Johnny Clayton, a thread-needle
thrower who has hit on better
than 50 per cent of his heaves.
They have four Michigan residents
on the roster, two of them top-
notch backs, and they have a
green but speedy line.
Despite betting odds and the
Wolverines vaunted power, Dart-
mouth's small but enthusiastic
Michigan alumni are hoping that
their alma mater will turn back
the clock for just two hours.
But we'll stick with the local
boys, four touchdowns to two.
Daily Classifieds
Get Quick Results

S "

(

s s s

PASJER AND QUA1MPEBAIK
NAMED TOP PLAYER IN
NEAJ ENGLAND IN 49, AND
RATED AS BEST OF MANY
GREAT PA0JSER5 IN DART-
MOUTHS GRID HISTORY
1P ROUND-UP:
Top Elevens in Nation Face
Possible Upset Tomorrow

{ -- -OHN HA5 COMPILED
A GREAT PASS RECORDS
COMPLETED 111OF 206 PASSES
FOR 1554 YARDS AND 19
TOUCHDOWNS \TH ONL'(
11 INTERCEPTED. HE IS
FROM CHELM5FORD,MA$5.

4

E-none. RBI-Woodling, Ashburn,
Coleman, Hamner. 3B-Hamner.

DiMaggio. 2B-Ashburn, Waitkus,
HR-DiMaggio. SB-Hamner. S-

7

6

Roberts, Waitkus. DP-Johnson, Coleman and Hopp; Rizzuto, Cole-
man and Hopp. Left-New York 11; Philadelphia 8. BB-Roberts 3
(Coleman, Reynolds, Rizzuto) Reynolds 4 (Hamner, Seminick,
Whitman, Mayo). SO-Reynolds 6 (Sisler 2, Jones, Roberts, Ennis,
Seminick); Roberts 5 (Berra, Mize, Reynolds 2, Johnson). Winner-
Reynolds; Loser-Roberts. U-Bill McGowan (A) plate; Dusty Bog-
gess (N) first base; Charlie Berry (A) second base; Jocko Conlan
(N) third base; Bill McKinley (A), left field foul line; Al Barlick
(N) right field foul line. T-3:06. A-32,660.
WHITER- BRIGHTER- WORK-FREE WASHES
CLOD I..RE
J ED. 0 D '. - """
HERE'S WHY-
You use famous Westing- We have plenty of Hot Water
house Laundromat automa- -140 degrees HOT. Plenty of
tic washers that wash, triple- Soft Water-rain-water.
rinse and damp-dry clothes. SOFT. Detergents prepared
Completely automatic. Your especially to -be used in
hands never touch water.' Laundromats.
University Laundromat
1327 S. University Phone 8412
between Forest & Washtenaw

PHILIP MORRIS challenges
eny other leading brand
to suggest this. test
HUNDREDS OF 'THOUSANDS OF
SMOKERS, who tried this test,
report in signed statements thar?
PHILIP MORRIS IS DEFINITELY
LESS IRRITATING, DEFINITELY -MILDER!

NEW YORK-P)-College foot-
ball's big four-Notre Dame, Mich-
igan State, Southern Methodist,
and Army --skirmish tomorrow
with tough foes capable. of up-
setting them in the biggest Sat-
urday of the season.
The quartet, ranked 1-2-3-4 in
the first Associated Press poll,
will meet opponents who either
have whipped or given them a
tussle in recent years. Another
eleven, tenth-ranked Washington,
is rated about even with UCLA.
That puts at least five of the top
ten teams in danger of dropping
from the undefeated class.
*. * *
THE UPSET possibilities are:
Purdue over Notre Dame - the
Boilermakers gave powerful Texas
a going over before losing Satur-
day while Notre Dame and quar-
terback Bob Williams had trouble
with North Carolina.
Maryland over Michigan State
-Georgia surprised the highly-
rated Easterners one week and
the next Saturday Michigan
State did the same to Michi-
gan. Maryland recovered in
walloping Navy last week.
Missouri over Southern Metho-
dist - on paper this appears im-
probable because Clemson routed
Don Faurot's Tigers Saturday
While SMU, with Fred Benners.
passing, upset Ohio State. Mis-
souri isn't that bad and two years
ago defeated a well-favored Mus-
tang team at Columbia.
* * *
PENN STATE over Army - Rip
Engle has installed the T at Penn

State after last year's compara
tively mediocre season. He whip.
Ded Georgtown with it Saturday,
and may out-T the Army quarte
of Bob Black, Gil'Stephengon, Jim
Cain and Jack Martin.
UCLA, in some quarters, rated
ahead of Washington in the
Pacific Coast Conference chase.
That was before fullback )lugh
McElhenny led the Huskies to
victory over heavyweight Min-
nesota.
Rounding out the top ten, Ok-
lahoma is heavily favored over
Texas A&M, Kentucky the same
over Dayton, Texas is idle, Stan-
ford ranks over Oregon'State and
California doesn't expect trouble
from Penn in one of the top three
intersectional clashes of the 'day.
TENNESSEE, RATED fourth in
the AP preseason poll bit upset
by Mississippi State Saturday, is
a slight underdog against Duk,e
led by Billy Cox.
North Carolina travels to Geo-
rgia for a rugged contest, and
Nebraska will try the almost im-
possible, defeat Minnesota at
Minneapolis.
In other Midwest games, . the
favorites are Illinois over Wiscon-
sin, Ohio State over Pittsburgh,
Iowa over Indiana and Kansas ov-
er Colorado.
* * *
COLUMBUS, O.-(A')-The"Ohio
State Buckeyes filled the air with
passes again yesterday , as they,
polished their pass offense andl
defense for Saturday's game with
Pitt.

(..- --

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Just take a puff-DON'T INHALE-and Do exactly the some thing-DON'T
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