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October 05, 1950 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-05

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PAGE SIX![

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1950

PAGE SIX THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5,1950

MATH MAPS WAY:
Survey Center Uses Random Sampling

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
Selecting people to interview in
a nation-wide research survey
sample is highly scientific business
for the University Survey Research
Center.
Man-on-the-street tactics are
strictly ignored by the University
researchers, who employ a more
complicated but truly dependable
method of obtaining sample sub-
jects for a survey.
* * *
KNOWN AS the random sample

method, the process is worked out
through a series of mathematical
calculations. These calculations
are set up in order to provide in-
terviews with a cross section of
the American public.
Thus, when one of the 200
interviewers employed by the
Center finally knocks on some-
one's door, he does so because
his path has been specifically
marked out and directed for
him by the workers in the Cen-

NOVEMBER ISSUE:
Generation Staff To Accept
Material for Fall Publication

The senior staff of Generation
is now accepting material for
publication in the Fall '51 issue,
which will appear in November,
according to Managing Editor
Louis Orlin, Grad.
The articles should be turned in
at the 'Ensian office in the Stu-
dent Publications Building.
"This semester," Orlin said, "the
magazine is increasing its content
value. Up-to-date articles will ap-
pear on contemporary problems,

such as the place of the atomic
bomb in our society or the trends
of labor-a type of material that
appeals to an American citizen."
"A well-written humor depart-
ment will also be initiated," he
added.'
The usual features on art, mu-!
sic, fiction and drama will be in-
cluded in this third issue. Design,
as last year, will play an import-
ant part in the magazine's make-
up.

ter's sampling office in Old West
Hospital.
According to Mrs. Dawn Hen-
dricks, administrative assistant,
the random sample method is the
only dependable way to obtain a
good sample survey. It has been
developed so that people from
every segment of life will be in-
cluded in a sample, she said.
THE METHOD, simplified,
works like this:
The country is divided into 66
groups, or strata, based upon the
density of population in a given
area. The first 12 groups are met-
ropolitan areas, and automatically
fall into the sample. Randomly, a
county is chosen to represent one
of each of the remaining 54 groups.
Then one to five towns, or possibly
a rural area, are chosen from each
county.
More mathematical and socio-
logical devices finally get the
research workers assigned to
blocks in each town, and then, to
dwelling units on a block. Rural
sections are mapped out accord-
ing to population and then
treated as if they were city
blocks.
"After we have mapped out the
areas for interviewing," Mrs.
Hendricks explained, "we contact
the interviewers in their districts
and supply them with the ad-
dresses."
Scattered through every district
of the country, the interviewers
are teachers, housewives, and part-
time business workers.
* * *
IN ORDER THAT they will have
as little trouble as possible when
they go to an unknown area, all
statistics which may prove helpful
are available for study in the
sampling office. Often aerial pho-
tographs of a chosen area are ob-
tained, and roads, railways, and
important land sites are mapped
for the field workers.
The interviewer is given the
job of listing the houses on the
specified blocks. These lists are
returned to the sampling office,
and when a survey is to be made,
addresses are selected by ran-
dom from the lists and sent to
the interviewer.
He is allowed no substitutions,
and sometimes finds it necessary
to return to a house several times
before he contacts the residents.

SWEDISH LANDSLIDE-Houses and sidewalks are uprooted in
industrial Surte, Sweden, following a landslide that crushed some
40 homes and moved a railroad 100 yards. Police said only one
person is known to have been killed.
Plans for South Quad Curtail
Residents' Outdoor Recreation

Adequate outdoor recreation
space will be a problem for South
Quad residents next year.
According to the architect's
plans of the Quad there will be
no courtyards or lawns large
enough for ball-playing, and ac-
cording to Peter A. Ostafin, of
the sociology department, resident
director of the West Quad, the
Students To Take
PharmacyTrip
Junior and senior pharmacy stu-
dents will take a two-day field
trip to Indianapolis, Ind., in No-
vember, Dean Charles H. Stock-
ing of the College of Pharmacy
has announced.
Scheduled for Nov. 8 to 10, the
trip, which is taken every two
years, is designed to acquaint
pharmacy students with new drugs
and the methods used in their
production.

11

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University cannot secure open
space in the vicinity of the Quad.
* * *
IN ORDER to have adequate
outdoor facilities, the dormitory
would have to be built some dis-
tance from the campus area. "But
I believe the men prefer being
close to campus," Ostafin asserted.
High costs of land and the
necessity of retaining rooming
houses in the campus area pre-
vented the University from ob-
taining a larger site for the new
Quad, Ostafin said.
However, according to Francis
G. Shiel, University residence hall
business manager, the triangular
plot of land bordering on Packard,
Thompson and Madison Streets,
owned by the University, will
probably be recreation area when
the South Quad is in use.
OSTAFIN REPORTED that an
elaborate educational, social, and
intra-mural program will be plan-
ned for the South Quad houses.
"Good recreation facilities in the
building will compensate for the
lack of outdoor space," Ostafin
said.
The ninth floor, which is the
roof of the building, will have
sundecks and a recreation hall
which-will run almost the com-
plete length of the floor. This
room will be furnished as a
semi-gymnasium with ping-
pong tables, weights, and other
equipment.
Four music practice rooms, a
darkroom for photographers, quar-
ters for house and Quad newspa-
pers and small recreation rooms
for card and chess games will oc-
cupy the ground floor.
Rare Medical
Books Shown
By Library
On current exhibition at the
General Library is a collection of
medical rarities, according to Ella
Hymans, curator of the Rare Book
Room.
The exhibition was planned to
help celebrate the 100th anniver-
sary of the University Medical
School, she said.
Included in the collection is a
copy of "De Fabrica" by Vesalius
who is considered the founder of
the science of human anatomy,
Miss Hymans explained. Medical
authorities consider this one of
the most important medical books
in the world.
Among other rare books being
shown are some of the first boks
on medicine ever printed, works
of Ambrose Pare, famous French
army surgeon, and old English
medical texts.
In addition there are first edi-
tions of the works of Edward Jen-
ner, inscribed by the author, in-
cluding two rare circulars explain-
ing his methods of smallpox vac-
cine innoculations, she concluded.
Now...at
OFFICE EQUIPMENT
you get this great
ROYAL PORTABLE

Lang, Alumni
Launch Drive
For phoenix
By VERNON EMERSON
With a 10,000 man alumni army
of fund raisers, Chester H. Lang,
'15, has started the drive for the
$6,500,000 goal of the Phoenix
Project.
Lang, who has the job of seeing
the campaign through to its finsh,
has a list of more than 120,000
alumni to be contacted by his do-
nation collecting squads.
"Even with all the help we'll
have, I suppose we will miss a lot
of people whose names aren't on
our lists," Lang said.
SOME VOLUNTEER workers
throughout the country are still
being organized to contact per-
sonally all alumni that can be
found.
Divided into 435 local commit-
tees scattered over the nation in
proportion to the number of
graduates in various areas, the
committeemen will meet once a
week to report their progress
and map out future contacts.
In addition to the drive here,
nearly 4,000 alumni in 32 foreign
countries will be asked to contri-
bute.
In the United States local chair-
men have organized their commit-
tees into 14 regions along the lines
of the Alumni Association's set-up,
Lang explained. And each regional
chairman appoints a state chair-
man.
* * *
"MICHIGAN'S county chairmen
have about as big a job to do as
other state directors," he pointed
out. "Five of the 14 regions are in
this state, Detroit being a region
by itself."
Langffigured that 45% of Uni-
versity alumni are in Michigan.
Some team captains on the
"firing line" are lagging a little
in turning in names of their
workers, he said. But, he con-
tinued, we have sent out 10,000
workers' kits, and expect them
all to be used.
"We would like to see alumni
turn in the whole Phoenix goal of
$6,500,000. But we've set up some
other committees to make sure we
reach our target."
. Lang and the executive commit-
tee have lined up, and in some
cases already begun, drives to
cover foundations, students' par-
ents, faculty, University employes,
Ann Arbor businesses and stu-
dents.
"It's nothing less than a six
ring circus," Lang said.
'U' Professor
Writes Book
The recently published book
"Radio and Television" is co-
authored by a University profes-
sor, Garnet R. Garrison of the
speech department.
The textbook, an introduction
to college radio and television
courses, was written with Giraud
Chester, professor of speech at
Queens College who has taught
radio classes at the University
during several summer sessions.
Television scripts as well as
script excerpts from radio broad-
casts appear in the text.

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