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October 05, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

istert, Wolverines in TopShape for Army Cadets

Entries for All-Campus
Tennis Tourney Close Today

* *

Bucks'Krall
Leads Backs
.After Openier
Ohio State Grabs,
Offensive Hnoors
Chicago - (A') - One football
game doesn't make a season, but
Ohio State's 46-7 walloping of In-
diana last Saturday gave the
Buckeyes ,the statistical jump on
the rest of the Big Ten.
Ohio's halfback Jerry Krall
gained 129 yards rushing for a,
10.7 average, completed four of
five passes for 50 yards, and scored
two touchdowns against the
Hoosiers to top the league's indi-
vidual performers.
The Buckeyes a'lso ranked the
l strongest offensive team with
their seven touchdowns against
Indiana. Defending. champion
Michigan and Minnesota, both
title favorites with Ohio, have
yet to play a eonference game.
Purdue has played two and the
other teams one each placing
four loop tilts on the record
books.
Krall, a 185-pound senior, led
in total offense with 179 yards. His
129 yards by rushing was behind
1 the 178 amassed by Purdue's John
Kerestes, but the Boilermaker full-
back has played -two games for a
5.7 average per try, half as good
as Krall.
Another Ohio player, quarter-
back Pandel Savic, leads the
league passers with five comple-
tions in eight tries for 75 yards
and two touchdowns.
Bob Petruska of Wisconsin
topped the punters with his 40.3
average on eight kicks against Illi-
nois. Three basketball players op-
-rating as ends pace the pass re-
ceivers, each with four grabs. They
;are Ronnie Bland of Purdue (77
yards), Dick Schnittker of Ohio
State (70) and Walt Kersulis of
Illinois (41).
Longest scoring run in early
games was Krall's 59-yard dash
against Indiana, while a 28-yard
pass by Iowa's Glenn Drahn to
end Bob MeKenzie against Purdue
was the longest pay-off pitch.

Varsity Practices Defense
Against Cadets' Formations

NO REST FOR THE WEARY-Casey Stengel and Burt Shotton,
who guided their teams through torrid pennant races in each
league, must be prepared for renewed headaches in the World
Series, which starts at Yankee Stadium today.
ALL IS CALM:
Notre ane, Huskies
Friendly; Storm Dies

. .CHICAGO - (A') - The storm
blown by four whistle-tooters in
the Notre Dame-Washington foot-
ball game Saturday faded to a
gentle breeze yesterday.
Notre Dame, *which won the
game at Seattle, 27-7, but hol-
lered at the officiating, said there
was nothing personal as far as the
University of Washington was
concerned.
WASHINGTON, in turn, also
scoffed at the idea that the epi-
sode meant the two schools would
never tussle on the grid anymore.
At a Chicago Football Writers
meeting, Irish Athletic Director
Edward (Moose) Krause ex-
plained that:
1. Notre Dame Coach Frank
Leahy acted "merely as a coach
defending against dirty football
inference" when he blasted offici-
ating which inflicted 135 yards in
penalties on the Irish.
2. Right after the game, he
(Krause) discussed possible future
games with Athletic Director Har-

Versatile.Line Spells Success
For Munn's Spartan Gridders

vey Cassill of Washington. (Sat-
urday's tilt ended a two-year series
between Notre Dame and Wash-
ington).
And 3. Movies of Saturday's
game showed that instances of
Notre Dame holding as interpret-
ed by the officials were wrongly
called.
AT SEATTLE, Joseph Drum-
heller, President of The University
of, Washington board of regents,
declared:
"Though 'one or two members
of the board may consider that
the Huskies were on the receiv-
ing end of unnecessarily rough
play by Notre Dame, I don't
think there is any concerted
feeling we should condemn No-
tre Dame or let Saturday's
game have any effect on our fu-
ture relationship with the Irish."
(A crowd of 41,000 which had
been a sell-out since early summer
-witnessed Saturday's struggle at
Seattle.)
KRAUSE showed movies of the
games to Chicago writers, but be-
cause the projection machine
could not be reversed or slowed up,
it was difficult to analyze any
penalties.
"It was the cleanest game I've
seen in my life," Krause de-
clared. "As for the pre-game
showing of movies of last year's
Washington-Notre Dame game
to officials, I don't think that
was cricket by any means.'
Washington admitted the four
officials had been shown the
movies to help in interpreting
rules.
Krause said that when Notre
Dame players left after the game
by bus, they were waved farewell
by Washington players. That, he
said, indicated the friendly spirit
of the game.
Big Ten Commissioner K. L.
(Tug) Wilson, in answer to a
question at the meeting, said there
was no difference in interpretation
of blocking between the midwest
and far west. This was in connec-
tion with the so-called elbow block
for which Notre Dame felt most of
its holding penalties were charged.
"The Pacific Coast Conference
instruction to officials on that
point was the same as ours," Wil-
son said. "It requires that the
hands be held against the chest in
the block."

Already high from the impres-
sive victory over Stanford last
week, Coach Bennie Oosterbaan's
Wolverine gridders got another
bcost today when they learned
that Captain and All-American Al
Wistert would be ready for Satur-
day's battle with Army.
Trainer Jim Hunt reported that
big Wistert, who limped off the
field in the second half of last
week's encounter with a pulled
ligament, recovered quickly and
should be ready to face the cadets.
The Michigan tackle was dressed
for yesterday's practice although
he did not participate in heavy
work.
* w
OTHER THAN Wistert, the
eleven is in top shape despite the
practice field, appearance of ace
wingback Leo Koceski and bull
fullback Dick Kempthorn with
bandaged legs. Koceski is wearing
a splint from his injury in the
Michigan State scrap, while
Kempthorn has a slight knee
bruise incurred in- the Stanford
scalping.
Don Robinson's Jayvee eleven
shot Arihy's Bill Orwig scouted
T-formation plays at the Wol-
verine's defensive lines for a full
hour in yesterdayk session. Ends
and defensive backs also re-
ceived a stiff workout in pass
defense.
Only wide plays had any meas-
ure of success against the tough
forward wall, while aerial protec-
tion improved as the afternoon
wore on.
Ends Ossie Clark, Harry Allis
and Irv Wisniewski were given a
Frosh Team
Shows Well
In Practices
Volatile Wally Weber's rangy
freshman football squad is already
starting to run off the tricky
Michigan plays with a smoothness
reminiscent of last year's excel-
lent yearlings.
Outstanding players are hard to
name at such an early date, but
Hill, Tupper and several of the
linemen have been showing a
hard-driving brand of ball.
Tupper particularly shone in
yesterday's practice session, man-
aging the tricky Michigan spins
with celerity and exhibiting a lot
of power through the line.

I
L
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ndians. Jim Walter paired with
Lloyd Heneveld at the defensive
;uard post, while Kempthorn ran AL WISTERT
with the top offensive backfield. . . downs leg injury.
F '
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With the student body at the University of
Minnesota in Minneapolis -it's the Coffman
XIeS Memorial Union. Coca-Cola is a favorite here, as
in \student gathering places everywhere. For a
", between-classes pause, or after an evening bull-
the wrld' smatestsession-Coke belongs.
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long session in pass-receiving
when the blue-shirted Varsity;
unit took the offensive. Allis wasI
outstanding in the pass-grabbing i
department with fake pass plays
also impressive.
John Ghindia continued to di-
rect the first team's attack, indi-
cating that the Ecorse quarter-
back may have won the post for
the remainder of the year with his
stellar signal-calling against the

Beginning with the men's singles
tennis tourney, the all-campus di-
vision of the Intra-mural program
swings into another sports year.
Entries will be accepted until
5 p.m. today at the I-M building.-
The first round will start at 4:15
on Thursday, October 6th.
THE TOURNAMENT will be
played on the Varsity courts ad-
jacent to the I-M building, and,
entries are much-needed at the,
present time.
The All-Campus. sports pro-
gram offers the individual non-

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

varsity athlete, a chance to com-
pete for honors against a field
of men from Residence ilk,
Fraternities, and lIndependent
teams.
The All-Campus tournaments
are open to all students, graduate
and undergraduate,, and to the
faculty. Each group is separated,
however, for actual tourney play.
The All-Campus division will
offer tournaments in nearly every
popular sport this year. and it is
likely that the cormpotition will
be very close during the coming
seasons.

EAST LANSING-(/P)-One of
the reasons for the success of the
Michigan State line so far this
year is because Biggie Munn has
been using three tackles in the
forward wall.
Harold (Bud) Gasser, now the
first string center, is tge third'tac-
kle in the Spartan lineup.
Gasser originally was- a cen-
ter. Then he was converted to
a tackle, and when the starting
center Dave Lumsden had in-
jury trouble Gasser was shifted
back' to center again.
Gasser, a 20-year old 203-pound
senior from Baldwin High in Birm-
ingham, took all the tricks he
learned at tackle over to the center
post with him. Besides proving
adept at ball-handling he's been
doing an outstanding job at back-
ing up the line and has been mak-
ing more than his share of the tac-
kles.
The success of Gasser at the
slot has convinced Munn that
_ he is on the right track when he
demands that his linesman be
versatile and quick-moving as
well as capable at the one spe-
cialty of their .position.
After a layoff on Monday, the

some 20 regulars who took most of
the punishment in the Marquette
game were back in the thick of
things at Tuesday's workout.
Munn started work on new plays
and also ran his varsity against a
freshman outfit equipped with
Maryland maneuvers.
"We can't ease up at all," Munn
said. "This Maryland team is com-
ing up looking for our scalps."
Trade in Hot Dogs
Not Cold at Games
NEW YORK-(IP)-The cater-
ing company which serves the fans
in both Yankee Stadium and Eb-
bets Field says that the spectators
at an ordinary ball game in Yan-
kee Stadium average two hot dogs
each per game.
Those in Ebbets Field average
about three each "because many
of the Ebbets Field fans eat at
least one hot dog an inning."
Moth Balls
PINKHAMS, N.H. - Mink-pre-
serving moth balls can also cause
anemia in children, according to
a study made by pediatricians.

.'

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Smart From Ear to Ear

a(

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NOTHING DISPELS THAT END-OF-THE-SUM-
MER -WILT FASTER THAN A SMART FALL
FELT! PRESTO QUICK ... GIVES YOU A BRISK,
READY-FOR-ACTION POISE. TRY IT. TAKES
ONLY A FEW SECONDS TO VEW OUR TEMPT-
ING FALL ARRAY. ONLY A JIFFY TO SPOT
YOUR FAVORITE STYLE. CONSIDER A FEW
OTHERS, TOO. TAKES LITTLE MORE THAN
LUNCH MONEY TO TAKE YOUR CHOICE. AND
THERE YOU ARE . . . SMART FROM EAR TO
EA&

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