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September 21, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-09-21

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SEPTEMBER 21, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'AGE SRVES?

I

)NE-MAN JURY ENDS:
Ex-Treasurer Awaits Trial

Class War...
(Continued from Page 1)

11

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Abolition of Michigan's one-
man grand jury system - one
which figured prominently in the
indictment of ex-county treasurer
Clyde Fleming - is formally set
for Saturday, while the defendant
awaits arraignment in County
Jail.
At present, Fleming is being
held at the county jail, pending
payment of about $15,000 in bonds.
His arraignment and subsequent
t trial on forgery and embezzling
charges is slated for October 10,
in County Court.
* *.*
MEANWHILE, former Republi-
can Congressional candidate Hen-
ry Barnes Jr., key witnes sat Flem-
ing's examination, plans the sec-
ond and third installments of his
radio speech, "The Washtenaw
Story," designed to give his inter-
pretation of the case. The first
talk, over station WPAG, came
Sunday. The others will be given
at 1:45 p.m. this Sunday and
next.
s Barnes was partly responsible
for getting William Verner to
run for county treasurer against
Fleming in last year's primar-
ies. Fleming was defeated, but
not before he had become em-
broiled in the forgery and em-
bezzling charges spanning five
of his seven years in office.

IN 1947, Barnes had testifiedj
Fleming was shortening the state
land board accounts. Two years
before, Fleming had confessed to
gambling in Ann Arbor in profes-
sionally operated games.
In his Congressional cam-
paign last year, Barnes said he
informed Circuit Judge James
Breakey of Flemig's supposed
swindle, and that Breakey re-
fused action. Barnes then pro-
duced signed complaints about
Fleming from other persons, he
claimed, which went to Prose-
cuting Attorney Douglas Read-
ing.
A forgery warrant was issued in
March after Verner reported some
taxes in the county books were
not recorded paid. Specifically, it
charged Fleming with forging
Ypsilanti tax-rolls with intent to
defraud.
PRIOR TO FLEMING'S exam-
ination, Barnes demanded of
Reading a 23-man grand jury to
investigate the case, but said he
was refused his request. Mean-
while, Judge Breakey instituted a
one-man grand jury probe, which
last month returned a 24-count
warrant against the ex-county
treasurer.
And at the fraud examination

held here last week, two signed
confessions were produced by
Reading, and both read into
the record. A state auditor em-
ployed by the jury set Fleming's
total embezzlement at more than
$15,000.
Fleming testified he took the
moneyntopay gambling debts and
for general expenses. His method
was simple - he told examiners
he'd make out a deposit slip for
office records, and one for the
bank.
The office slip would check, he
confessed. But he put in an extra,
check or checks on his bank slip
and took out the equivalent cash
value, thereby keeping the books
balanced. Naturally, he would
make invalid receipts for each
forged check.

same day. Arrangements are not
yet complete for this race.
Ed Reifel, '51, will handle ar-
rangements for the tugs-of-war.
A further outlet for the under-
classmen's energy is the musical
comedy to be presented on Fri-
day of Tug Week by the two
classes.
An all-campus Hard Times
Dance on Saturday night will cap
the week's activities. Tentatively
scheduled for the Michigan
League, the dance is being planned
by a committee headed by Adele
Hager, '50.
A talent call for the musical
comedy has been issued by Stone.
His message to underclassmen is,
'"If you can sing, dance, or act'
and are an eligible Frosh or Soph
-or know someone who can-call
Adele Hager, whose phone is
2-3255. Tryouts will be held at 4
p.m., September 28, 29 and 30 in
the Michigan Union."

A

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ANN RBOR'S
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XI.5O

AUTHENTICITY PLUS:
Union Opera Counts Sally
Rand Among Supporters

Even Sally Rand has been a
Union Opera fan.
The famous exponent of the fan
and bubble dances gave a lesson
in the art of pleasing audiences
to the cast of the 1934 issue of the
Opera, "With Banners Flying."
* * *
BECAUSE of the time-honored
tradition that Union Operas were
to have an all-male cast, Miss
Rand did not actuall unfurl her
talents in the show.
Union Opera has been a cam-
pus tradition since 1908, when
the Michigan Union produced
its first masculine musical com-
edy, "Michigenda."
"Michigenda" and "Culture,"
the 1909 opera, proved to be such
hits that the Union Opera has
been an annual affair for most of
the years since.-
THE CAMPUS' manpower
shortage during World War II
curtailed Opera activities for an
eight-year period, until "Froggy
Bottom" hit the boards of the
Michigan Theatre in March of
this year.
s Plans are now being made by
the hard working opera staff for
next spring's show, which will
be the second of the post war
series.
In pre-war days, Union Opera
was one of the really big events
on the year's entertainment and
social calendar.
Some of the better shows, such
as "Cotton Stockings," "Tam-
bourine" and "Rainbow's End"
took lengthy road tours, playing
in New York, Washington and
other cities throughout the coun-
try. *
"TAMBOURINE," the 1925
opera, is reported to have drawn
laughter from the usually silent
President Calvin Coolidge when he
saw it during its visit to the
nation's capital.
Another distinguished politi-
cian, Gov. Thomas E. Dewey of
New York, starred in the 1923
opera "Top o' th' Mornin''". Ile

played the role of Patrick
O'Dare - an Irish country
gentleman who sang such songs
as "A Paradise for Micks" and
"Satan Put the Devil in the
Irish."
Old reports indicate that Dewey
was pretty good. He was an un-
dergraduate in the University's
music school at the time.
Speaking of music, many of the
traditional campus song favorites
werefirst heard in past Union
Operas.
"COLLEGE DAYS" and the
"Friar's Song" are among the
many tunes produced by the
Opera.
The 1950 opera will be pro-
A. .nnd r nr., d i', t +1-i a rnhbe n i

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auce some ime arin nespring
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until late in this semester, but
work on the musical score will
begin in the near future.
If present plans of the opera
staff work out, the show will leave
An Arbor for a brief road tour,
probably during the University's
spring vacation.

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER

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