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October 02, 1949 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-02

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2, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY_____
Uo

with ROZ VIRSHUP

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN;

Despite protests to the contrary
the large number of radio sets on
campus seems to indicate that
students do find time to "tune in."
In addition to their favorite pro-
grams they've been giving a boost
to the hooperatings of everything
that happens to be on the air
when theyslam the books shut
and turn on the little dial.
IF YOU ARE generally dissat-
isfied with what you find in your
U.S Students
Participate in
Dutch Parade
(Continued from Page 1)

aimless wanderings over the dial
it is sincerely hoped that this col-
umn and the radio listings which
will appear daily will add to your
listening pleasure.
This is the first in a series of
columns which will attempt to
select and give a' thumbnail
sketch of such radio fare that
might appeal to a campus air-
wave audience. Today we'll take
a look at top dramatic pro-
grams.
"Theatre Guild on the Air"
(8:30 Sunday WJR) offers a con-
sistently good combination of
Broadway and screen stars with
classic plays and able adaptations.
Today they are putting on Elmer
Rice's "Counselor At Law" starring
James Cagney and Meg Mundy of
"Respectful Prostitute" fame.
SOMETHING very special is the
Norman Corwin directed and pro-
duced series (4 p.m. Sun. WWJ)
dramatizing little known achieve-
ments of the United Nations Eco-
nomic Commission for Europe.
Today, the fourth in a series of
six portrays social and economic
reconstruction in post-war Eu-
rope through a journey by Orient
Express from Paris to Constanti-
nople.
The "NBC Theatre' presents
university players in adaptations
of great novels and plays. Again,
Sunday is the day (2 p.m. WWJ).
This week they're doing William
James' "Portrait of a Lady."
Unpredictable but worthy of
mention is the Screen Directors
playhouse (10 p.m. Mon. WWJ)
which presents favorite films of
outstanding movie directors with
the stars of the original cast. "A

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1949
VOL. LX, No. 7
Notices
The Office of Admissions with
Advanced Standing, of the College
of "Literature, Science and the.
Arts, has been made a part of the
Office of the Director of Admis-
sions. Because of moving, students
are asked to delay calling at that
office until Tues., Oct. 4, when it
will be located at 1524 Administra-
tion Building.
Faculty of the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts: Meet-
ing, 4:10 p.m., Mon., Oct. 3, 1025
Angell Hall.
AGENDA
1. Consideration of the minutes
of the meeting of June 6, 1949 (pp.
1515-1516).
2. Presentation of new mem-
bers.
3. Resolutions for Professors
Daniel L. Rich and William H.
Worrell.
4. Memorial for Prof. DeWitt
H. Parker.
5. Consideration of reports sub-
mitted with the call to this meet-
ing.
a. Executive Committee-Prof.
W. H. Maurer.
b. Executive Board of the
Graduate School-Prof. F. K.
Sparrow. No report.
c. Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs - Prof.
Shorey Peterson. No report.
d. Deans' Conference-Dean
Hayward Keniston. No report.
6. Announcements.
7. New business.
School of Business Administra-

tration. A convocation commem-
orating the 25th anniversary of
the establishment of the School
will be held in the Rackham Lect-
ure Hall at 11 a.m., Oct. 5. The
speaker will be Edmund E. Day,
Chancellor of Cornell University,
the first dean of the School of
Business Administration. His sub-
ject will be "Social Responsibili-
ties of Business Education."
Applications for Grants in Sup-
port of Research Projects: Fac-
ulty members, who wish to apply
for grants from the Research
Funds to support research projects
during the current academic year,
should file their applications in
the Office of the Graduate School
by Fri., Oct. 7. Application forms
will be mailed or can be obtain-
ed at Rm. 1006 Rackham Bldg.,
telephone 372.
Student Tea: President and Mrs.
Ruthven will be at home to stu-
dents from 4 to 6 o'clock on Wed-
nesday, October 5.
University Community Center,
Willow Village.
Sun., Oct. 2, Village Church Fel-
lowship, Interdenominational; 10:-
45 a.m. Service, World-Wide Com-
munion.
Mon., Oct. 3, 8:30 a.m. Coopera-
tive Nursery opens. 8 p.m. Regis-
tration for Cooperative Nursery.
Tues., Oct. 4, 8 p.m. Church So-
cial Committee. 8 p.m. Wives' Club
Play-reading group. 8 p.m. Wives'
Club Fashion Show committee.
Wed., Oct. 5, 8 p.m. Ceramics.
Thurs., Oct. 6, 8 p.m. Ceramics.
8 p.m. Choir.
Standards of Conduct:
Enrollment in the University
carries with it obligations in re-
gard to conduct, not only in a
classroom but outside as well. Stu-
dents are expected to conduct
themselves in such a manner as
to be a credit both to themselves
and to the University. They are

amenable to the laws governing
the community, to the rules and
regulations of the University and
of University officials. They are
expected to observe the standards
of conduct approved by the Uni-
versity.
Whenever a student, group of
students, society, fraternity, or
other student organization fails to
observe either the general stand-
ards of conduct as above outlined
or any specific ones which may be
adopted by the proper University
authorities, or conducts himself or
itself in such a manner as to make
it apparent that he or it is not a
desirable member or part of the
University, he or it shall be liable
to disciplinary action by the prop-
er University authorities. (By-
laws, 1948, Sec. 8.03).
In interpretation of the forego-
ing general standards of conduct,
the University Committee on Stu-
dent Conduct announces the fol-
lowing specific standards:
The presence of women guests
in men's residences, except for ex-
change and guest dinners or for
social events or calling hours ap-
proved by the Office of Student
Affairs, is not permitted.
The use or presence of intoxi-
cating liquors in student quarters
is not permitted.
Student organizations are ex-
pected to take all reasonable
measures to promote among their
members conduct consistent with
good morals and good taste, and
to endeavor by all reasonable
means to insure conformity with
the foregoing standards of con-
duct.
The following University regu-
lations and procedures apply to
closed social events sponsored by
student organizations:
(1) Approval is required for all
functions at which both men and
women are to be present. Requests
for approval must be submitted to

the Office of Student Affairs by
the social chairman of the organi-
zation no later than noon of the
Monday before the event is sched-
uled. Request forms are available
in the Office of Student Affairs.
In the case of a fraternity or a
sorority, written approval from
the financial adviser of the group
must accompany the request for
approval for any function for
which the estimated expenditure
is more than -25.
(2) Chaperons: Signed accep-
tances of at least two chaperons-
preferably two married couples
such as faculty members, parents
of students, alumni, or married
students of sufficiently mature
years-must accompany the re-
quest for approval.
(3) No intoxicating beverages
shall be served or consumed at
any student-sponsored function.
(4) Social functions held in
student residences are restricted
to the main floor.
(5) Dances shall close not later
than 12 midnight. Dances may be
held only on Friday or Saturday
nights or on a night preceding a
University holiday. Dances may
not be held on any night preced-
ing a University vacation period.
(6) No student dances shall be
conducted at any time by individ-
ual students, or by groups of stu-
dents not constituting recognized
organizations.
(7) Footfall game broadcast
entertainments: Men's organized
house groups will be authorized to
entertain women guests to hear
broadcasts of out-of-town Michi-
gan games between 2:30 p.m. and
5:30 p.m. on the Saturday of the
game. Groups planning such en-
tertainment must notify the Of-
fice of Student Affairs by 12
o'clock noon of the Thursday
prior to the scheduled game.
Chaperons may be a resident
house director or one married
couple at least 25 years of age.

(8) Football game open houses:
Open houses may be held in stu-
dent residences before and after
football games between 11:30 a.m.
and 1:30 p.m. for pre-game func-
tions and between 5 p.m. and 71
p.m. for post-game functions.
Guest chaperons are not required,
and registration in the Office of
Student Affairs is not necessary.
(9) Exchange and guest din-
ners: Exchange and guest dinners
may be held in organized student
residences between 5:30 p.m. and
(Continued on Page 4)

Riding Horses

English or
Western tack
Ranch Hills
4255 Washtenaw Avenue
Ph. 2-8834

MARSHALL'S
DRUGS ... 235 South State
STATE THEATRE NEXT TO US
from
7:30 BREAKFAST
special 75c 'DINNER
"Just You will like
Good our speedy service
Food" and tasty food.
AT MARSHALL'S FOUNTAIN BAR
- ANN ARBOR'S NEWEST,
MOST MODERN EATING PLACE

r
I

::..

leading citizens prepared
tasty dish.

the

FOLLOWING the dinner, we
viewed an epic outdoor farmer's
show depicting the role of the
farmer in the life of the village.
In extent the show rivalled
the vast creations of Cecil B.
De Mille. Horses, tractors, big
wagons and even a haystack
were set up and removed from
the huge stage during the
course of the presentation.
The rest of the evening was
spent slumming in tiny cellar beer
halls where fine -Dutch beer and
a tasty alcoholic flavored custard
were served on the tops of kegs,
while we sat on rough hewn log
stools.
* * *
DAN VING and singing, both in
the tiny taverns and on the
streets, continued long into the
night.
We had planned to sleep that
night in the barn of a neigh-
boring castle, but our gracious
hosts insisted we stay with
them in their pin-neat homes.
It was hospitality unexcelled.
At the home of our particular
host, the assistant manager of a
local cheese factory, we learned
of Hattem's special grudge aris-
ing from the war.
S* * w
IT SEEMS THAT following
World War I, the good people of
Hattem welcomed into their
homes for periods ranging from
three to five years young under-
nourished. Austrian children.
As in some of the Scandina-
vian, countries, when Hitler in-
vaied, it was these same youths,
fl! German wehrmacht uni-
forms, who led the Nazi forces
to Hattem.
"Many of these boys tried to
visittheir foster parents," our
host said, "but the enraged
Dutch families slammed the doors
in their faces."
* * *
THE NEXT MORNING after a
customary Dutch-type breakfast
of bread covered with sugar, choc-
olate, cheese and sometimes meat,
and coffee we boarded a deco-
rated 15th century horse-drawn
coach, rode to the edge of town
and caught a bus back to Arnhem.
Our experience was another
example of the graciousness and
generosity of the Dutch to for-
eigners.
Technic Calls
For Engineers
Engineers interested in working
on the Technic, Engine school
magazine, have been invited to at-
tend a meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tues-
day in Rm. 203 West Engineering
Annex, according to Lexie Herrin,
managing editor.
Positions are open on the lit-
erary, advertising, make-up, and
circulation staffs.
"This is an excellent opportun-
ity for an engineer to gain ex-
perience in the technical writing,
publication, or business manage-
ment encountered in the produc-
tion of a magazine," Herrin said.
He welcomed any potential try-
outs to "drop into the Technic
office any time."
USC Wins
LOS ANGELES-(P-Southern
California's vaunted Trojans, per-
forming like lazy giants, woke up
in the second half and went on
to bat out a 35 to 7 victory over
an outmanned Washington State
team yessterday.

11

Letter to Three Wives" is
for tomorrow.

billed

Ts
Today's
ii
Programs
TODAY'S PROGRAMS
RADIO -- CBS Symphony Or-
chestra (3 p.m. WJR) Milton
Katims conducting Blow's
"Venus and Adonis" Suite.
Raff's "Im Walde," and
Faure's "Pavanne."
TELEVISION - "Tonight on
Broadway" (7 p.m. CBS-TV)
scenes from "Lend an Ear."
TOMORROW - Boston .Sym-
phonyDress Rehearsal (1 p.m.
WWJ) Charles Munch con-
ducting music by Weber, Han-
del, Schubert and Beethoven.
"Telephone Hour" (9 p.m.
WWJ) featuring Gladys
Swartout.
"Railroad Hour" (8 p.m.
WWJ) Gordon MacRae, Lu-
cille Norman, Dorothy Kirsten
in Showboat.

OHouLtong is l
your list ofI'
things left
athome? _ _ _ _
BATES BEDSPREADS
RUGS FOR YOUR ROOM
1 H3 (We have foursizes in all the Decorator colors.)
SHO BGS- LAUNDRY BAGS - SHEETS - PILLOW CASES_
Get them all in one stop at the
GAGE LNEN SHOP
0 11 Nickels Arcade Phone 2-0114
boc -- cg-- s< -- o - o -a- o<-- o o<--7c-- o <>c-

MEDICAL LAW DENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH
BOOKS and SUPPLIES

Overbeck

Iookstore

THE MEDICAL BOOK STORE

Phone 4436

1216 South University

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.:

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~ M
Chain
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ENGRAVED FREE
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chain comes with dog tags-

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Cornerstone of Your
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The "Buckler" . . . it's heavenly . . .
actually feel the lift of foamy crepe as

Littlc
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