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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. - ..R. . r.. rte.

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Camera Man
Contract Plan
Calls cGach FDance
Pictures Unfair
Ann Arbor photographer Bob
Gach's new plan for photo con-
tracting was attacked yesterday
by Bob Moffett, '1E, an inde-
pendent dance photographer.
Under the present plan, Moffett
said, a photographer assumes the
risk of making or losing money on
his pictures depending on the
whim of the customer.
BUT UNDER Gach's plan, Mof-
fett continued, "The photographer
would be paid for his negative and
gain a profit by just shooting the
dance. Up to this time, Gach has
given his negative away as free
good-will advertising, and the
student was free to take his nega-
tive to any finisher in town.

"Mysterious Document
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"Under the present business
conditions there is only one
firm which also does commercial
finishing, and it is only that
business which stands to im-
prove or even maintain its posi-
tion by this measure," he con-
tinued.
The only real difference between
the present situation and the pro-
posed method is that the student
would bear the cost of the nega-
tive in a higher price of his dance
ticket, Moffett contended.
"THE FACT THAT the free dis-
tribution of negatives is not now
used on every dance indicates that
some people prefer individualized
party pictures - those printed
with a crest-to ordinary commer-
cial finishing at cheap prices," he
concluded,
Defending his plan, Gach said,
"I will continue to work under
the present system as long as the
students want me to."
He declared his plan was an at-
tempt to allow student operators
rather than professionals to do
the work without a heavy invest-
ment in overhead, but under a
control which will keep things
*clean'."
"NOTHING could be cheaper
than competitive bidding on the
taking of the films, followed by
ownership of the film by the stu-
dent, and freedom to choose the
commercial firm which will make
the prints, with no charges for
additional services tacked on."
"But that," Moffett countered
late last night, "is exactly what
the students get now.
"Why," he asked, "should they
have to pay for the negative?"
Edmoilson
Named Head
OfET A Group
Dean James B. Edmonson, of
the School of Education, has been
appointed chairman of a Ntional
Education Association committee
which proposes to outlaw fraudul-
ent schools and colleges.
The committee will study state
requirements for college, trade
school and correspondence school
charters and license grants.
"The program is aimed at the
educational underworld-the gyp
and bogus trade schools and col-
leges which exist in large num-
bers. We have records of about 56
of these so-called colleges," Dean
Edmonson said last night.
The committee hopes to develop
model legislation to be followed by
state legislatures which would pre-
vent "shyster institutions" from
selling degrees. Michigan's laws to
keep out the "sheep skinners," are
better than those in most states,
he added.
Dean Edmonson emphasized
that the committee will not attack
trade schools in general but will
aim to eliminate all fraudulent
schools "which are a threat to
reputable schools."
'Ensian To Jump
One Buck Soon
Price of the 1950 'Ensan will be
raised from $5 to $6 Feb. 17, ac-
cording to Bill Osterman, '51,
campus salesmanager.
"This is only four days after
second semester starts," Oster-
man said, "so we urge students to
buy their yearbooks soon."
'Ensians may be purchased at
registration or from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. every day in the Michigan-
ensian office in the Student Pub-
lications Bldg.

"This year's 'Ensian will con-
tain 500 pages and a bigger sport
section," Osterman said.
Purnl Can-,se r dr'aia t

Near Eastern
Schools Offer
3-Year Jobs
Foreign Colleges
Need Teachers
Signing your name to a three-
year contract tonteach in Turkey,
Greece or Lebanon entitles you to
a free visit to a far-away coun-
try.
Applications for teaching posi-
tions are being accepted by the
Near East College Association for
Robert College in Istanbul, Tur-
key; The 'American College for
Girls, also in Istanbul; Athens
College in Athens, Greece; and the
American University of Beirut in
Beirut, Lebanon.
ROBERT COLLEGE is accept-
ing applications for a mathema-
tics, two English, mechanical en-
gineering and civil engineering in-
structors. This college is also in
need of an experienced music
teacher who can play organ and
piano to direct choral groups.
Robert College is located on
the Bosphorus near Istanbul and
is chartered by the Board of
Regents of New York State. The
college operates under the edu-
cational laws of Turkey.
The American College for Girls,
which is accepting women candi-
dates only, is looking for chemis-
try, mathematics, English, physi-
cal education and biology teach-
ers.
THE COLLEGE, located near
Robert College, is chartered under
the laws ofMassachusettsuand
operates under the laws of Tur-
key. It is a four-year college with
a preparatory department.
Athens College has openings
for a physics instructor and an
English instructor.
This college is in a suburb of
Athens, Greece. It is chartered
by the Board of Regents of New
York State and operated within
the framework of the Greek edu-
cational system. Its ten-year pro-
gram takes boys at the age of ten.
It has a preparatory department;
and two years of college.
* * *
THE AMERICAN University of
Beirut needs an associate profes-
sor and two assistant professors.
The associate professor will teach
political science, and the assis-
tant professors will instruct phy-
sics and English. The university
is Also looking for physics and
English instructors.
Contracts are signed for a three
year period. Room, board and
laundry are provided for single
instructors during the academic
year.

By JIM KEMPER
Mental illness keeps up with the
times.
So discovered an abnormal psy-
chology class when they visited
the Ypsilanti State Mental Hospi-
tal last week.
IN FORMER YEARS hospitals
used to get a lot of Napoleons, Dr.
Lowell, clinical director of the
hospital, told the class, but today
more of the patients are atomic
scientists and Communist refugees.
And schizophrenics that once re-
ceived messages by wireless today
see visions on television.
The hospital itself is one of
the most up-to-date institu-
tions of its kind, and the new-
est in Michigan. The difficult
job of caring for the 4000 pa-
tients is handled by a staff
headed by 17 doctors and 12
social workers.
With two gyms and a golf
course open to them, and dances
and movies held three times week-
ly, Dr. Lowell said the inmates
probably enjoyed more social life
than University students.
A FEW OF the more severe
Ward To Go
To Japan for
PoliticalStudy
Robert E. Ward, of the political
science department, will leave Feb.
24, to begin a year of "grass roots"
research in Okayama, Japan.
He will work with Prof. Rich-
ard Beardsley, of the anthropology
department and Douglas Eyre,
Grad., who is doing research in
geography. The men will make a
cooperative study of Japanese cul-
ture in the area.
"The Center for Japanese Stud-
ies at the University has chosen
the Inland Sea location because
it feels this region is character-
istically Japanese," he explained.
He pointed out that most such
studies originate in Tokyo and
have a natural big city national
bias. "We want to do our study-
ing at the grass roots," he said.
Ward, who is making his first
trip to Japan, plans to make a
survey of local Japanes govern-
mental.systems on his own.
He remarked that it will be the
first such study made by an Eng-
lish speaking person.
DO YOU KNOW ... that only one
person has ever cleared over 15
feet in the Pole Vault?

cases, some pathetically amusing,
some tragic, were shown to the
class. There were some well
enough to be allowed freedom of
the grounds, while others had
been in a trance-like stupor for
years and had absolutely no in-
terest in their surroundings.
Not all mental illness stems
from- insecure, unhappy homes,
Dr. Lowell pointed out. He said
there are many cases where a
normal child is born into a nor-
mal home, yet develops mental
deficiencies later in life, and
other cases where the child is
born deficient at birth.
Through the studies of family
backgrounds, however, a great deal
can be learned about the patients,
Dr. Lowell added. In this way some
types of insanity have been proven
hereditary.
THROUGH a careful study of
each patient's behavior at the
hospital reactions can be noted to
help determine the patient's treat-
ment. The new electric shock
treatment has been very success-
ful in treating certain types of
casesnsuch as the manic depres-
sives, he said.
While Dr. Lowell stressed the
fact that not enough is yet known
to draw any general conclusion as
to the causes and treatment of
insanity,he said that active re-
search in the field is now going on.

NO MORE NAPOLEONS:
Insanity Goes Modern,
Psych Class Discovers

Senior Job
Hunters WId
MeetToday
A meeting for all seniors, es-
pecially Febr~uary graduates, will
b held at 4:10 p.m. today in the
Natural Science Auditorium by the
Bureau of Appointments.
At the meeting T. Luther Pur-
dom, director of the Bureau, will
discuss procedures for getting
jobs, and what students can do
over vacation to look for jobs,
Apparently some February
graduates don't really want jobs,
Purdom has discovered. A large
number of them have incomplete
records at the Bureau which are of
little value to prospective em-
ployers.
"Graduates must work hard this
year to find jobs," he emphasized.
"The Bureau can do its part well
only if students cooperate fully."
Luckman Quits Lever
NEW YORK-P)-The resigna-
tion of Charles Luckman as pres-
ident of Lever Brothers Co., was
announced yesterday.
THE
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
COMPLIMENTARY ENGRAVING
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733

.

- ----

HEADQUARTERS for PORTA

TYPEWRITERS

By NORM RIVKEES
A raging undercover fight over
whether to build a hydrogen-pow-
ered atomic-bomb threatens to
engulf scientists, military experts

and administration figures in an
open eruption.
Before making a final decision
to go ahead with the hydrogen
bomb, the Senate-House Atomic
Committee plans to review again

HERE'S THE DOPE:
Caffeine-Conscious Campus
Offered 'Midnight Oil' Advice

t By EVA SIMON
Students who take drugs to keep
awake the night before an exam
are just fooling thefnselves, local
pharmacists and University doc-
tors agree.
They might just as well drink
coffee.
* * *
THE ONLY stimulant in these
advertised drugs is caffeine, Dr.
John D. Morley of the Health Ser-
vice explained. One cup of cof-
fee contains almost as much caf-
feine as one of the tablets sold
by most drug stores, he added.
Though no physical harm re-
sults from taking such drugs
occasionally," -he said, contin-
ued addiction, resulting in lack
of sleep over a long period, is a
"short sighted policy" and will
"eventually catch up" with the
student.
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, direc-
tor of the Health Service, deplored
the fact that students are taking
drugs to catch up on work they
should have done during the se-
mester.
* * *
"DRUGS MAY stimulate a stu-
dent for a few hours," he remark-
ed, but often, because of this over-
stimulation, he may not do well
the next day on his examination."
Several students have come to
the Health Service lately be-
cause of "anxieties, fears and
tensions" brought on by the
advent of finals," Dr. Forsythe
said.
But the total number of stu -
r Iu

dents in Health Service, he point-
ed out, has actually decreased.
The reason for this, he speculated,
may be that many students put
off having their illnesses treated
until after finals.
Local druggists noted some
rise in the sale of stimulating
drugs as finals approached.
Though they did not know of any
specific harm done by the tablets,
they generally found the job of
selling them distasteful.
They agreed that any benefit
students derive from the drugs are
'largely psychological."
Students Establish
Memorial Fund
Students of the late Prof. Louis
Granich, who was recently killed
in an auto accident, set up a
Granich Memorial Fund at a
meeting held recently.
Contributions or pledges of over
$500 has been collected thus far,
according to Shirley Schneider of
the Fund committee. The com-
mittee urged that all graduate and
undergraduate students wishing
to contribute to the fund bring
their contributions or pledges to
Carolyn Weichlein or Miss
Schneider in Rm. 2121, Natural
Science Building.
Final disposition of the money
will be made after all contribu-
tions have been collected. March
1 has been set as the deadline for
making contributions.

its possibilities, both from the
military and moral points of view.
* * *
THIS MOVE reflects on the ser-
iousness of the undercover scrap-
ping since there were hints, earl-
ier, that the committee was about
ready to recommend that the gov-
ernment go ahead with the hydro-
gen bomb.
Utilizing hydrogen - the
atomic fuel of the sun and stars
-this new weapon dwarfs the
original atom bomb into almost
pea-shooter proportions.
Interest was expressed in the
developments by state Veterans of
Foreign Wars Commander Herbert
W. Devine, who said that he plans
to ask for "all information pos-
sible without violation of mili.
tary security" on the hydrogen
bomb.
* * *
REFLECTING on the the theory
and development of the new hy-
drogen bomb, a University physi-
cist said it would be possible to
make just as powerful a uranium
bomb, but because of difficulties
in 'focusing" the blast all the
energy could not be utilized.
Continuing, he accounted for
the super-power of the hydro-
gen bomb in that "percentage -
ly" speaking, there is a larger
amount of energy in hydrogen
than in uranium.
Considering the consequences of
this development, he suggested
the possibility of a chain reaction
which would destroy the earth.

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AFTER-INVENTORY
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LAST WEEK OF SUPER SPECIALS!
This is the final clean-up of STORE-WIDE BARGAINS

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*ANY *
221 EAST LIBERTY
Phone 2-6220

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Kuohn's January
C/eapnnce
of Men's SUITS
and TOPCOATS
Look at these
Savings!
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SU ITS
All wool gabardines,
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$48.75
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' U ENYR E ECORDG
S=>COLLECTORS ITEMS
ON STANDARD 78 R.P.M.
rVARIATIONS ON A THEME BY HAYDN
U (Brahms) LAl
London Philharmonic-Van Beinum_ 5.
0
SSYMPHONY NO. 8 (Anton Bruckner) DGS
Hamburg Phi Iharmon ic-Jochum. 29
OCONCERTO GROSSO IN A MINOR (Vivaldi) DGS
S Leipzig Gewandhaus - Schmitz 6.
SPIANO CONCERTO NO. 24 IN C MINOR,
K491 (Mozart) LAl
K.Ln, Amsterdam Orch.-Van Beinum-9.
STOD UND VERKLARUNG (R. Strauss) DGS
o Berlin Philharmonic-De Sobata 8.
OAN DIE FERNE GELIEBTE (Beethovern) DGS
Heinrich Schlusnus, Baritone ,6.
SSCHERZO CAPRICCIOSO (Dvorak) LAl
London Philharmonic-K. Rankl 5.
0L'EL ISI R D'AMOR E: UNAFUTA
LAGRIMA T.52
Dusan Georgevic, Tenor with Orch. 2.
9 Look to London and Deutsche Gramophon Recording

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OVERCOATS
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16
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317
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34
45
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01
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% 0f

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flannel shirts - fancy dress
shirts - work trousers - flan-
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Scarves . . . Fancy Wool and Rayon
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One Lot Pajamas $4.45 to $8.95........ choice $2.00
One Lot Initial Handkerchiefs 75c .......... now 25c

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