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January 19, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE l M

Fl TtE .M-lit ,i4X V WU?

TIHURSDAY, JANUJARY 19, 1950

Medical School's New, Faster
X-Ray Records Heart Action

INDIAN SEES AMERICA:
Bombay Student A irs Views on U.S.
-d# *

Heart defects are now being de-
tected with greater accuracy by
means of a new X-ray camera
perfected by the medical school.
The difficulty which confronted
the doctors formerly was in find-
ing an X-ray machine which could
take exposures of the heart in
very rapid succession, according
to Dr. Fred J. Hodges of the medi-
cal school.
* * *
THE NEW MACHINE can take
as many as four to six exposures
per second, while the capacity of
THE
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
IMMEDIATE - DELIVERY
COMPLIMENTARY ENGRAVING
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733

the old type was two exposures
per second.
The perfection of this equip-
ment climaxed two years work
by Dr. Melvin M. Figley, Dr.
William H. Thompson, and Dr.
Hodges, of the medical school.
In order to take X-rays of the
heart a substance must be inject-
ed into the blood stream which
makes the blood opague to the
piercing eye of the camera.
"Blood, however, moves very
rapidly through our vessels," said
Dr. Hodges. "In order for the
picture to be effective it must be
taken before the opague sub-
stance is whisked away in the fast
moving stream."
Dr. Hodges claimed that it
would aid in pre-surgical examin-
ation of structural abnormalities
such as exists at birth in the con-
dition of "blue babies."

FAIRNESS ... .
RELIABILITY..
ABILITY TO
ANALYZE THE
NEWVS....
THAT'S.
Thomas .
THE WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENTS$
FAVORITE WASHINGTON COLUMNIST
In a poll of the Washington correspondents, Thomas L.
Stokes, a Pulitzer Prize winner, was voted "The Wash-
ington correspondent who does the best ail-around job
as measured in terms of reliability, fairness and ability
to analyze the news."
You will agree with the Washington correspondents who
paid Stokes this triple tribute when you read his daily
column which will start
FEBRUARY 14 in the
~k~v1Mir4~wn~kId

By HERB ROVNER
America is gradually drifting
toward socialism, according to
Harshad Desai, Spec., of Bombay,
India, who arrived here in 1945
with a B.S. in engineering from
the University of Bombay.
Sent by the Saurashtra gov-
ernment, a sub-state of Bombay,
Desai has received his B.S. anc
master's degree in chemistry here.
* * *
IMPRESSED BY what he re-
fers to as "the semi-classless so-
ciety of America," Desai believes
that Americans are more demo-
cratic socially than politically.
"Within the last decade, pri-
vate firms have been ready to
hire foreigners at an equal wage
rate, but the immigration laws
have prevented such employ-
ment," Desai explained.
"Of course these laws were madE
in the earlier days when foreign-
ers by accepting lower wages de-
creased the standard of living,"
he pointed out.
* *
COMPARING THIS university
with the University of Bombay,
Desai said that the main differ-
ence is that the University of
Bombay is patterned basically af-
ter British universities with yearly
examinations rather than semes-
ter finals.
"The American system of edu-
cation is superior in this re-
spect for here we are forced to
study regularly because of the
weekly or monthly exams which
do not constitute a part of the
final grade in Bombay schools,'"
he said.
"Therefore, many of the stu-
dents don't study for eight months
and concentrate their efforts the
last two months on studying for
the finals, merely memorizing and
learning nothing," Desai contin-
ued.

ture, Desai said America had made
distinctive contributions to archi-
tecture which he considers mod-
ern and in some respects function-
al; and music, especially jazz and
western tunes, which come from
the heart of the American peo-
p.e.
Desai is a Democrat largely
because he believes most people
are not mature enough political-
ly to support Henry Wallace,
whom he admires. He believes
the Republicans are thinking in
terms of a world of fifty years
ago.
"Roosevelt's America, however,
was far more progressive than
Truman's America is," Desai de-
clared.
Regarding the United States'
foreign policy, Desai admitted that
while the staff is a brilliant and
educated one, the inexperience of
many of the personnel explains
the. failure of the United States
on such policy questions as China.
Speaking of the International
Center, Desai called it "a wonder-
ful place, the one place where I
really feel one world exists."

ACL To Sponsor
Russian Picture
The Russian film "Magic Horse"
will be presented by the Art Cine-
ma League at 8:30 p.m. today,
tomorrow and Saturday at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets will be on sale at the
theatre box office from 2 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. before each showing.
All seats will be reserved.
"The color film is musically and
artistically good . . . typical of
many Russian folk tales," com-
mented Mrs. Tatiana Wiles of the
Russian department.
Co-featured with it will be "Ru-
bens," a Belgian film on the works
of the Flemish painter.

ASH
For Your USED BOOKS
A Square Deal Always
Ulrich r's

;}

ti

. .

-Daly-- 3urt bapowulcf
HARSDAH DESAI
... Indian student on campus
* * *
thority, and the Smokey Moun-
tains of North Carolina.
* * *
IN DISCUSSING American cul-

N

DESAI BECAME interested in
America as a young boy when he
started reading books about Amer-
ica and saw his first talking movie,
"Devil May Care" with Ramon
Navarro. He also admits to having
been a great Garbo fan.
"When I arrived in America,
the most fascinating sight was
all the mechanical gadgets, es-
pecially the Automat," Desai
said.
During his stay in America, De-
sai has traveled through 35 states
and visited cities in 14 of them,
including Boston, New York, New
Orleans, and Los Angeles. He also
toured the Tennessee Valley Au-

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