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January 18, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE SIX

F THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19,

MM

STARGAZING BY RADIO:
West Quad "Hams 'Contact South Africa

P r-Med Students To ur
'U' Hospital Facilities

HAIL TO THE COLORS:
Colorful History Found
Behind Maize and Blue

4

* *

By JACK LAZARUS
"William 8 Zebra Sugar Queen
calling Zebra Sugar 4 Baker Love."
This may strike many as a new
foreign language, but radio "ham"
operators can easily translate it
into "Station W8ZSQ, West Quad-
rangle calling Station ZS4BL,
South Africa."
AT THE REQUEST of Prof.
Freeman D. Miller of the astron-
omy department, the West Quad
Radio Station has tackled the job
of contacting a "ham" station lo-
cated near the Lamont-Hussey
Observatory of the University in
South Africa.
Contact has been made just
once with station ZS4BL in
South Africa according to Rob-
ert Wimmer, '52 West Quad
Radio Station president.
"Because of weather difficulties
and the fact that the South Afri-
can station is lacking strength,
radio operator Ralph Hileman has
spent many hours without suc-
cess," he commented.
* *
"IF CONTACT could be made
with Karl Henize, Observing As-
sistant stationed at the African
observatory, I could ask my ques-
tion and get immediate answers,"
Prof. Miller remarked.
"It now takes about three
weeks-if luck is with us-to
get replies through the mail,"
he added.
Henize was sent to the Lamont-
Hussey Observatory in Nov. 1948,
so that he might observe the
southern skies, Prof. Miller ex-
plained.
USING AN astronomical cam-
era loaned by the Mt. Wilson Ob-

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
"HAM" BROADCASTS-From the West Quad Station W8ZSQ,
radio operator Ralph Hileman (left) attempts to contact Karl
Henize at the Lamont-Hussey Observatory in South Africa while
Prof. Freeman D. Miller of the astronomy department waits hope-
fully. Henize, an observing assistant, is dong research for Prof.
Miller and the Mt. Wilson Observatory. Only one attempt thus
far has proven successful.

servatory, Henize photographs the
sky and reports to both Mt. Wil-
son and Prof. Miller.
"While the Mt. Wilson Ob-
servatory is primarily interest-
ed in the milky way, the Univer-
sity is interested in two neigh-

boring galaxies," Prof. Miller
said.
Wimmer pointed out that radio
waves from the West Quad must
travel more thanehalf way around
the world before reaching their
destination.

Students Change Easily to '50
University students didn't have speedy adjustment was the sig-
any trouble this year making the turn of the half century.
drastic change from 1949 to 1950, Another gave credit to the stu-
daccording to campus librarians' dents, explaining "people up here
A search through library slips are on the ball."
for absent-minded offenders re-
vealed only four bearing the out-
dated "1949." Librarians generally DO YOU KNOW . . . that an
agreed this mark is better than in average race horse eats 20 pounds
past years. of hay, nine quarts of oats and
One reason suggested for the two quarts of bran per day?

SAVINGS on SUITS

A
.A

Grand for now, and
all thru spring.
Half Yearly
SALE
. . . and a marvelous oppor-
tunity to save $$ and $$ on
fashion suits so important to
the coming season's wardrobe.
Buy now! Wear your new suit
under furs ... later as a smart
street costume.
" WOOL CREPES
" GABARDINES
" BOTANYS
" TWEEDS
" MAN-TAILORED
STYLES
" DRESSMAKER
STYLES

1\ew Michigan
Singers Group
To SingToday
Campus Debut To Be
Led by Prof. Klein
The Michigan Singers, an extra-
curricular choral group led by
Prof. Maynard Klein, director of
the University Choir, will make
their campus debut at 8:30 p.m.
today in Hill Auditorium.,
The choir of 52 voices will sing
a group of Motets by Hienrich
Schuts, Tomas Luis de Victate,
Josquin de Pres and Palestrina.
These selections will be fol-
lowed by Rossetti's "The Blessed
Damozel" by Debussy, sung by
Norma Heyde, Grad. and narrated
by Harriet Boden. Brahms' Zig-
eunerlieder and Liebeslieder will
complete the program-
* * *
THE MICHIGAN Singers, more
than 90 percent of which represent
the School of Music, is open to
the entire student body for mem-
bership.
Standards for admission are
relatively high because of the
nature of the music sung and
the limited time of rehearsal,
Prof. Klein said.
This program marks the first
full concert on campus by the
choir. The group took a minor
part in many concerts last year,
and during the semester gave a
full program in Saginaw.
* * *
PROF. KLEIN hopes the Mich-
igan Singers will beecome a regu-
lar part of the musical tradition
on the Michigan campus and, in
addition, make off-campus trips
in the interest of the University.
Tonight's concert is open to the
public.

By JOHN DAVIES
Operating rooms, wards, occu-
pational therapy rooms and miles
of corridors were among the sights
observed by nearly 80 pre-Medical
Society members who toured the
University Hospital recently.
Given in three sections, the
tour was conducted by Herbert
Anderson and Nathan Fairchild
of the hospital's administration
staff.
* * *
THE TOUR generally began
with a brief explanation of the
Hospital's physical layout.
They pointed out that the
University Hospital treats only
LSA Drops
Combined
Curricula Plan
(Continued from Page 1)
curriculum programs was under-
taken to restore the integrity of
the bachelor of arts degree, ac-
cording to Dean Peake
"In addition to this, the his-
torical reason for the combined
curriculums no longer exists."
"These programs were originally
instigated to provide an incentive
for a pre-professional student to
take three years of liberal arts
work in the days when it was
possible to enter a professional
school with only two years of
undergraduate work.
"Now, competition for entrance
to most professional schools is so
keen that a degree is usually nec-
essary to gain admittance," the
dean explained.
(For example, Dean A. C. Furs-
tenburg, of the medical school es-
timates that 70 percent of those
admitted to the medical school
last year had degrees).
Another reason why the college
felt that it could make the change,
according to the dean, is to be
found in the relatively small num-
bers of students who make use of
the combined curriculum course
of study.
"Last spring, for example, only
33 of the 333 students in the law
school freshman class were on
combined curriculum. There were
32 out of 146 freshmen medical
students in the program at.that
time and only three business ad-
ministration students.
"Forestry had no one in the
program and in dental school
there had been only one in the
last five years until this year when
the count rose to five."
Ask Ru shing)(
Report Now
With fraternity spring rushing
just around the corner, IFC chair-
man Bob Preston, '51E, yesterday
requested all houses to notify him
at 2-5644 "as soon as possible" as
to whether or not they intend to
rush next semester.
Rushing registration will be
held from 3-5 p.m. Feb. 13-16 at
Rm. 3C of the Union. Fee will be
two dollars and applies only to
those who have not signed up pre-
viously, Preston explained.
Formal rushing will commence
Feb. 19 and will extend through
Mar. 5, he added.
The majority of campus frater-
nities will participate in the spring
program, but it is not a practice
for all organizations to rush then,
Preston pointed out.

patients referred to it by doc-
tors in the state.
In addition, the hospital is en-
tirely self-supporting, with the
exception of the Veterans' Read-
justment Center and the Neuro-
psychiatric Institute.
THE STUDENTS were then
taken to the registration section
of the first floor, where the pa-
tient's name and other pertinent
data are typed directly on a du-
plicating machine form.
Several copies of the registra-
tion form are run off and sent
to many different departments
of the hospital.
Near the registration desk the
students were shown rooms used
in taking blood samples for Kahn
tests and the adjoining room used
for taking miniature x-rays of all
patients.
* * *
NEXT STOP on the tour was
the ninth-and top-floor of the
building, where the occupational
therapy room, the Galen's Shop
and the Kiwanis' Play Room, a
nursery for small children, are
located.
In the occupational- therapy
room, the premeds examined
pieces of equipment-a printing
press, weaving loom, pottery
wheel and power tools used by
the patients in regaining use of
muscle groups damaged during ill-
ness.
Tour members were then con-
ducted to the children's wards
on the sixth floor.
The children, many of them
wearing plaster casts, were seen
through glass windows located be-
tween their rooms and the corri-
dors.
ON ANOTHER part of the same
floor, the students visited a typi-
cal open ward for adults, con-
taining 18 beds. Over each bed is
a curtain ring which permit a
cubicle curtain to be drawn for
privacy.
The wards, which are located.
in the Y-wing's of the main
structure, have a solarium at the
far end.
Each week educational movies
are shown in the wards, the guides
said.
Next, a typical private single
room-moderate sized, simply fur-
nished and, in this case, having
a superb view of the Huron
River-was examined.
* *
THE PREMEDS visited the op-
erating room suite of the hospital,
containing 11 operating rooms-
nine for major operations, two
for minor ones.l
Alongside the operating rooms
are anesthetizing rooms, where
the patient is put to sleep be-1
fore being wheeled in for sur-

SLAIN WITH SPEARS - The
bodies of Prof. Marvin Pittman
(above) and Dr. Robert F. Conk-
lin, both exchange professors at
the University of the Philip-
pines, have been discovered in a
shallow grave in the moun-
tains of Northern Luzon. Three
natives have confessed the rob-
bery-slayings, the U.S. Embassy
reported.
Allison
Will Conduct
Course Here
Prof. Allison Davis, of the Uni-
versity of Chicago has been ap-
pointed the first Negro professor
to teach in the University.
As a visiting professor,he will
teach a course in social stratifica-
tion in American communities.
Prof. Davis will commute from the
University of Chicago where he
now instructs.
PROF. DAVIS is best known for
his study of class and caste lines,
according to Prof. Amos Hawley
of the sociology department.
His book "Deep South" is a
study of class structure in south-
ern communities.
Graduated from Williams Col-
lege, Prof. Davis also attended
Harvard- and the University of
Chicago. He was a Rosenwald
fellow at the London School of
Economics in 1932-33.
In 1948 he was appointed full
professor of education at the Uni-
versity of Chicago.
ulVie Theatre
Plans Drama
Four University students will
play roles in the Ann Arbor Civic
Theatre's production of George
Kelly's "The Torchbearers" to be
presented at 8 p.m., Jan. 24 and
25 in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
A. Howard Fieldsteel, Grad,
will play the principal role as
Frederick Ritter, a man tortured
and confused by his wife's am-
bitions to go on the stage.
Other students in the produc-
tion are' Art Nevins, '51, who will
play Mr. Spindler, a would-be
drama expert and Ralph Guy, '51
and Herb Rovner, '51, doubling in
the role of Teddy Spearing, an
aspiring thespian.
Also in the cast of the three-
act farce is Marjorie Steward,
assistant Law School librarian and
wife of a law student.

gery.
The
typical
ating
system

students were shown a
operating room, with oper-
table, intricate lighting
and air conditioning units.
* * *

By RICH THOMAS
Blue is blue and yellow is yel-
low, but it took the University 50
years and an act of the Regents
to decide if this bit of spectral
dogma was true.
From 1859 to 1912 speculation
was rife as to just what the school
colors - maize and azure blue -
should be. For a time, the Univer-
sity was operating under a double
standard; the athletic department
had their shades, the administra-
tion sanctioned their's.
* *- *
THE FIRST record of the use
of any colors at all appears on
the diploma of an Elisha Jones,
'59, to which document was at-
tached a ribbon of deep blue.
Then in 1867, a committee of
students met in the old Univer-
sity chapel and proclaimed the
official colors to be "azure blue
and maize." The exact shades
of these colors, however, were
never precisely defined by the
committee. That's where the
trouble really started.
For a while the regulation hues
were the yellow of ripe Indian
corn and the blue of the deep sea
or cobalt. But after a few years,
the colors mysteriously began to
fade.
BY THE TURN of the century,
apparently due to a misconception
of the meaning of maize and azure
blue, they had reached the shades
of baby blue and light lemon yel-
low.
The tints were so anemic that
the athletic department had found
them completely ineffectual for
use as decorations and uniforms
reverted to the more vibrant tones
originally intended.
In official circles, however, the

badly-laundered colors and the
kaleidoscopic situation prevailed
until 1912.
With the 75th anniversary of
the founding of the University
drawing near, the Board of Re-
gents acted, appointing a com-
mittee of professors to study the
chaos and resolve it if possible.
THE RESULTING report dis-
covered that maize and azure blue
were the virile colors as set forth
by the committee of '67, not the
ones currently in use.
A hasty change was made in all
decorations, emblems and banners,
and the University was able to
present a solid, undivided front to
the celebrating alumni, saving re-
lations and undoubtedly several
thousands of dollars in contribu-
tions.
Things have never been quite
so colorful since.
'U' Coed Honored
Geraldine Mulson, '50E has been
awarded a scholarship by Kappa
Kappa Gamma, national college
sorority, of which she is a mem-
ber.
Miss Mulson is one of 19 under-
graduates in colleges and uni-
versities all overdthe country who
were so honored.
Treasurer Elected
Mrs. Juanita B. Mantle, of the
Bureau of Appointments, has been
elected treasurer of the National
Institutional Teacher Placement
Association.
Mrs. Mantle is assistant to Dr.
T. Luther Purdom, director of the
Bureau of Appointments and past
president of the association.

;

Ready for
J JHOP WEEKENDP,
INVITATIONS PLACE CARDS
MONOGRAMMED NAPKINS COASTERS
PLAYING CARDS MATCHES
THE CRAFT PRESS
330 MAYNARD SrREET
Announces
GRAND PRIZE WINNERS
OF THE 1949
FOOTBALL
CONTEST I
THANKS A MILfLON, FRIFNDS1 THE
SCORECAST CONTEST WAS THE 8I6GEST YET W/TH MORE
WINNERS THAN EVER BEFORE! SO UNTIL NEXT YEAR,
WHEN WE HOPE TO BE BACK AGAIN-SMOKE THE ONE
CIGARETTE PROVED DEFINITELY LESS IRRITATING,
DEFINITELY MILDER THAN ANY OTHER LEADING BRANDI
SMOKE PHILIP MORRIS!

i

ONE OPERATING room, had a
gallery for medical students. The
gallery is rarely used now, be-
cause operations can be more
clearly observed by using lifts-
small stands-for the med stu-
dents to stand on.
The operating rooms will soon
undergo a renovation program.
New floor coverings, lighting sys-
tems and doors will be installed,
guides pointed out.

Yd. L&XM CQ. at ay. N4ifl. . . :r.-] * -
Bunche,UNPalestineMediator, Inspection Set New Hospital Is Planned
Human Relations Speaker Tomorrow foror Community, Colgate
'1l Addew AROTC Unit Cowdumn.'to Pay Third of Total Go.
" __ .C. ,'.,. lmo" 8 . m Are. nd n Lu, nityto
t" ::::::.: ::. ................. ..........

i

.!

ate t

SPECIAL GROUP of
MEN'S SOCKS
Regularly 75c to $1.50
39c pr.

:

4.

Reg. 49.95
NOW 38.00

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Suits Originally from 49.95 to 69.95
NoW 2 to 38
HALF YEARLY SALE ON ACCESSORIES TOO!
HATS -BLOUSES -SCARVES - BELTS

USE OUR TUXEDO RENTAL SERVICE
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