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January 18, 1950 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1950-01-18

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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CORNER

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League Politicking

RADICALS-who ought to have an impor-
tant function in the University-have
been growing pitifully weak. Anyone who has
watched the recent activities of the Inter,
Racial Association, or observed the factional
squabble in the Committee to End Discrim-
ination, or noticed the absence of the once-
powerful campus American Veterans Com-
mittee, must conclude that all is not what
it might be.
In fact, it has come to the point where
the campus radical either degenerates in-
to a half-hysterical propagandizer or gives
up entirely and joins a Serious Group of
Little Thinkers.
The great days of the Gerhart Eisler "in-
cident," and the picketing of the barber-
shops, seem to be fading further in the past.
All the avowed Communists have departed.
There isn't even a Communist on The Daily
any more-much to the regret, by the way,
of its non-Communist editors-though we do
have a few good conservatives.
*~ * *
DEMOCRACY is helped by radicals, almost
anyone would admit that--and those
who doubt it would do well to read "Why
Communists Are Valuable," in this month's
Harper's.
The decline of the radicals at Michigan
is doubly unfortunate because this is a
conservative institution, where the status
quo tends to seem better than any possible
alternative. And where a radical has to
be a clear thinker and a hard fighter to get
anywhere, the 1950 Michigan version is
doubly ineffectual.
Whatever the reason for this decline-
whether it is the cold war, local persecution,
or a general loss of hope among the left
wing-it's nothing to rejoice at. Surely it is
better to have the case of the radical well
presented, and the cause of the left-wing
strongly advocated, than to allow all desire
for change to die in default of any stimulus
more effective than the maunderings of to-
day's radicals.
-Philip Dawson
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: PAUL BRENTLINGER

THE FURORE created recently over Wo-
men's Judiciary Council petitioning rais-
es the question of whether the League should
continue to handle Judiciary appointments.
Charges and counter-charges have
flown concerning the League's petitioning
and interviewing set-up. Perhaps League
President Marjorie Flint furnished the
key to the whole situation when she said
it was "customary as a practical measure
in making appointments" to ask women
petitioning for League posts whether
they'd be interested in positions other
than those they were seeking.
"Sometimes coeds don't petition for the
jobs to which they would be best suited," she
said. "A woman might apply for the office
of treasurer when she would make a better
vice-president."
The implications of this statement are
clear-that applicants for League positions
are juggled into the positions where League
authorities feel they are "suited," regardless
of the office-seekers' choices.
This juggling has long been practiced at
the League, as observers can point out. As a
result, petty politicking-sometimes charac-
terized by whisper campaigns and mud-
sling-has been a feature of appointments.
This sort of thing may be "practical". So
is picking the next Presidential candidate

by bosses in convention hotel rooms, I sup-
pose.
But it smacks of undemocratic methods,
from which Women's Judiciary should be
divorced if it is to maintain the prestige
and influence that can ultimately streng-
then student government.
League officers themselves avow that they
desire the finest women possible serving on
Judiciary. Their decision to re-open peti-
tioning for the three Council positions is
commendable, and it's to be hoped that a
large number of able coeds will seek Judi-
ciary seats.
But, important though it is, the move is
only a stop-gap measure. In the future,
Judiciary appointments might well be
turned over to a group like the Student
Legislature which is more representative
of all women students than is the League.
I am not attacking Women's Judiciary it-
self as an organization devoted to petty
politics. Even though these unsavory me-
thods of placement are not used in appoint-
ing Judiciary members, the fact that they
are employed generally for other League jobs
makes that organization entirely unsuitable
for making Judiciary appointments.
In any event, the Judiciary should be freed
from the atmosphere of back-room politics
that now surrounds League appointments.
-Mary Stein.

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 23-FEBRUARY 3, 1950
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and recitations,
the time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having recitations only, the time of the class
is the time of the first recitation period. Certain courses will
be examined at special periods as noted below the regular
schedule. 12 o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes
and other "irregular" classes may use any examination period
provided there is no conflict (or one with conflicts if the con-
flicts are arranged for by the "irregular" class). A final ex-
amination on February 3 is available for "irregular" classes
which are unable to utilize an earlier period.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination. In the College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination
may be changed without the consent of the Committee on Ex-
aminations.

/etteP4 TO THE EDITOR
The Daily welcomes communications from its readers on matters of
general interest, and will publish all letters which are signed by the writer
and in good taste. Letters exceeding 300 words in length, defamatory or
libelous letters, and letters which for any reason are not in good taste will
be condensed, edited, or withheld from publication at the discretion of the
editors.

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

ON THE
Washington Merry- Go -Round
WITH DREW PEARSON

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

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9 ...........................M on.,
10 ...........................W ed.,
11 ...........................F ri.,
1 ...........................Sat.,
2 ...........................W ed.,
3 ...........................Thurs.,
8 ...........................T ues.,
. .....-.. .......... . Tues.,
10 ............... ...........Thurs.,
11 ...........................Sat.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.

30,
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9-12
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J-Hop Bands ...
To the Editor:
THE J-Hop Committee was care-
ful in choosing the bands to
play for this year's dance. It has
been customary to have one band
which is competent in specialty
numbers and one band which is
outstanding for its danceable mu-
sic. Duke Ellington is bringing a
28-piece organization to the dance
and with this large a group should
be able to play some satisfactory
dance music.
The big point, however, for
Messrs. Kershon and Passaris to
remember is that by contract both
Ellington and Louis Prima will
play four slow, one novelty, and
one of their own choice out of
every set of six numbers. The
bands will thus be playing music
in accord with the dignity of the
dance. We hope you and other
skeptics will attend to hear the
type of sentimental music these
two bands can play.
-The J-Hop Committee
Ned Hess, Chairman
To the Editor:
IN THEIR LETTER to the editor
last Saturday, Messrs. Kershon
and Passaris didta magnificent
job-of' showing their ignorance.
It is certainly obvious that they
have ri'ever seen the Duke at a
dance, or possibly never even lis-
tened to many of his 1,200 records,
most of - which are "slow, senti-
mental numbers."
Certainly the type of music
played by the Duke at a jazz con-
cert is not particularly danceable,
but it is not common practice to
dance in an auditorium. Let me
emphasize that this is not a jazz

concert but a dance, and I am sure
everyone will be very happy with
the music emanating from at least
one side of the ballroom..
--Ray Richardson
March of Dimes
To the Editor:
A YEAR AGO students on cam-
pus contributed a total of
$466.88 to the March of Dimes ..
Yet, should each of you contri-
bute only one dime, we would
have more than $2,000 to add to
our fund. The county goal is
$36,000, half of which will remain
in the county, while the other half
wil be sent to the National Foun-
dation for Infantile Paralysis to
be used for study and research
and to ease the financial load of
communities where epidemics hit
the hardest.
Polio is certainly the most in-
considerate of all diseases. It crip-
ples and kills without warning and
with no regard for age, race or
color, high or low income. In 1948,
27.894 persons were stricken with
infantile paralysis, and 1949 rec-
ords, yet to be completed, show an
alarming increase in the number
of cases of this expensive disease.
The annual March of Dimes
campaign for funds for the Na-
tional Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis is now underway and
will continue through this month.
The Washtenaw County chapter
needs your help, for it pays the
bills at University hospital . for
those of you who might fall prey
to this disease. Last. year the
county ran $4,000 in debt because
of the increased polio epidemic.
Will you deny yourself the price
of one large coke to help in the
fight against polio?
Mrs. Robert Langford,
City Chairman.

1.........
2..........
3..........

..................W ed.,
..................Thurs.,
..................Fri.,

WASHINGTON-Only a handful of Re-
publicans know all the details, but Gen-
eral MacArthur had much more to do with
stirring up the current furor over Formosa
than even the State Department realizes.
The General may or may not have
meant to throw a political bombshell, but
he has certainly caused more political
headaches and come nearer to splitting
the bipartisan foreign policy than any-
thing in ten years-though, of course, Bri-
tain's simultaneous recognition of China
also helped.
What MacArthur did was to have stern,
private talks with visiting GOP Congress-
men, especially bustling Senator Knowland
of California, plodding Senator Ferguson of
Michigan, and fussy ex-Princeton Profes-
fessor Smith of New Jersey. MacArthur's
lectures were delivered in a confidential

MATTER OF FACT:

4.

Gad, They'd Better

By JOSEPH and STEWART ALSOP
W ASHINGTON - The obyious (and
known) intent of Secretary of State
Acheson's speech on Asiatic policy was to
prepare for the ultimate recognition of the
Chinese Communist government. Perhaps
the best way to approach this thorny prob-
lem is through an old story. The story is re-
peated here in certain quarters, where know-
MUSIC
DEPRESSION is a state one acknowledges
and deals with, for the most part non-
violently, when it is brought about by mat-
ters tangible. When, however, one is thrust
into it by such an art as music, performed
without inspiration, without enthusiasm or
interest, one feels violent impulses which can
only be directed inwardly and result in a
great disillusioned fatigue. I speak of the
Franck D Minor Symphony and Thor John-
son's Cincinnati Orchestra in concert at Hill
Auditorium last night. Perhaps the musi-
cians were tired-what they produced was
tiring- a manufactured item entirely apart
from themselves. It isn't fair to do that to
music.
Some may object to Sir Hamilton Harty's
arrangement of a suite from "The Water
Music" of Handel because of the augmented
orchestra. Whether the fuller orchestra is a
detriment to the music or not (an old de-
bated question about transcriptions), it could
have been enjoyable with more spirit, en-
semble, and pretision on thge part of the
orchestra. Fragmentarily Handelian, the
suite lacked consistence of style, had cad-
ences forced into ritard, and was inhibited
rhythmically. We felt a little happy in the
"Hornpipe" movement.
Truly Strauss (Richard) employs the
orchestra masterfully, creating great var-
ieties of tone color, special effects, etc.,
but what does it mean? If you know the
programme of "Joseph's Legend," you may
have extricated some degree of pleasure'
from the composition. Musically, alone,
there was loud noise, clashing, banging,
boistercusness, with little scheme to hold
It together.
If it were merely a case of technical
faults-poor intonation, indecisive attacks,
lack of complete ensemble, we wouldn't be
so viciously wrought up. But the passiveness
displayed in performing this music is some-

ledge of our past follies in China does not ob-
struct a realistic view of the present situa-
tion.
In brief, Boston's celebrated female
transcendentalist, Margaret Fuller, once
announced, in a moment of enthusiasm,
that she "accepted the universe." Miss
Fuller's acceptance of the universe was
subsequently reported to Thomas Carlyle,
who remarked dourly: "Gad, she'd better."
The Chinese Communist government is
now in full possession of China. Going on
our bellies to Mae Tse-Tung will earn us a
rebuff no doubt, as it has earned the British
a rebuff. But pretending that facts are not
facts, and that Mao Tse-Tung's government
is not ruling China from Peiping, will get us
nowhere at all. The obviously sensible thing
to do is to open relations with this establish-
ed government, at the earliest appropriate
moment, and wtihout any indication of ap-
proval.
* * *
RECENT EVENTS, moreover, have vastly
strengthened the practical arguments
for opening relations with the Chinese Com-
munist government. Behind Acheson's hints
about Tito-ism in China, there is solid in-
telligence which the Secretary did not dis-
close.
It is probable that Mao Tse-Tung's visit
to Moscow constitutes one of the great
dramas in the whole history of the Com-
munist party. The Chinese have a much
more specific complaint against the Rus-
sians Ohan Acheson indicated.
At Moscow, the Kremlin is reported to be
pressing Moa Tse-Tung for acceptance cir
a standard satellite status, on the Polish or
Romanian model. Mao Tse-Tung, in turn,
is reported to be pressing for return of in-
dustrial booty stolen by the Russians from
Manchuria; for re-establishment of Chinese
control of the chief Manchurian cities; and
for permission to direct China's affairs as
local necessities dictate. The divergence is
very wide.
* * *
O THESE REPORTS of the Kremlin con-
versations, one must add the even more
solid evidence of what has now happened in
Japan. Sanzo Nosaka, the real power in the
Japanese Communist Party, spent the years
from the mid-'30s onward with Mao Tse-
Tung, whose close friend he is. When the
war ended, he was sent to Japan to re-estab-
lish the apparatus of the Japanese Com-
munist Party, and to transmit to it the
Kremlin line of that period. Evidently he
established an apparatus personally domina-

manner with severe instructions that he was
not to be quoted. His language was also
stiffer to the Congressmen than in his re-
ports to the Army.
Usually he started by saying something
like this:
"I have not been consulted by Washing-
ton on strategy in the Far East, and parti-
cularly on Formosa. If Formosa falls, the
cold war is lost. Russia will control India in
two years, and our position in Japan will be
untenable. Russia now has 40,000 troops in
fortified islands to our north."
Those who raised a delicate question
about Chiang Kai-Shek's integrity receiv-
ed a haughty: "The Generalissimo is one
of the great men to come out of the war.
He was shamefully sold down the river at
Yalta and Potsdam. He has been smeared
by the apologizers and the radicals. Yes,
there has been corruption in the Chiang
regime, but it is a product of his environ-
ment and tradition, and no fault of Chi-
ang himself."
MacArthur seemed to take pleasW-in
overriding the State Department in sending
two of the Sehators-Ferguson and Smith-
to Formosa. After the State Department ve-
toed airpline flights to Formosa for the two
Senators, MacArthur sent the two Senators
by a special plane with a guide from his own
staff.
Note 1-Secretary of Defense Louis John-
son, who also made a big try for U.S. inter-
vention in Formosa, is peeved at General
MacArthur's extracurricular showmanship
due to the fact that Assistant Secretary of
Army Tracy Voorheees was especially sent
to Tokyo in December to consult MacArthur
and bring back his views. However, Mac-
Arthur gave Voorhees no such alarming
views as he gave the wide-eyed Congressmen.
Note 2-Though not as eloquent as Mac-
Arthur, Adm. Arthur W. Radford also argued
to Congressmen who stopped off in Hono-
lulu that Pacific fleet units should cover
Formosa.
(Copyright, 1949, by the Bell Syndicate, Inc.)
Last of the
Krupps
T HIS WEEK, in the now-quiet town of
Salzburg,, Austria, an old man who held
the military power of Germany in his iron
fist for half a century died.
He was Gustav Krupp, and with him
died a bloody and disgusting legend. His
massive armament plants produced the
guns and steel and tanks and planes that
laid Europe waste in two great wars.
He inherited the foundries and forges of
the Krupp family from his father-in-law,
Fritz Krupp, and took upon himself the
family name. With the aid of Emperor Wil-
helm, he gained a monopoly of German ar-
mament contracts in 1904, and helped to
start the fiery rush of steel and explosive
manufacture which culminated in the First
World War.
When the war ended in 1918, his plants
employed an estimated 167,000 people and
his untold profits were subjects of discds-
sion in every country of Western Europe and
the Americas.
He joined with a racketeer named Hitler
to start the German nation on its second
trip to destruction, and once again reaped
profits which placed the estimated worth
of the Krupp family's holdings at between
a half-billion and a billion dollars.
He escaped his due share of responsibility
in the crimes of the German war lords be-
cause he was paralyzed and unable to attend

English 1, 2 ............................ M on.,
Psychology 31 ..........................Mon.,
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31,
32, 61, 62, 91, 92, 93, 153 .............. Tues.,
Speech 31, 32 ..........................Tues.,
German 1, 2, 31......................Wed.,
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 .................... Wed.,
Botany 1; Zoology 1 ....................Thurs.,
Chemistry 1, 3, 21, 55 .................... Fri.,
Sociology 51, 54, 90 ...................... Mon.,
Political Science 1 ...................... Mon.,
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101 ............Tues.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

24,
24,
25,
25,
26,
27,
30,
30,
31,
2,

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L

I

Russian 1 .............................. Thurs., Feb.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

(Continued from Page 2)

Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of ex-
aminations, see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
JANUARY 23 to FEBRUARY 3, 1950
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time
of the first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209, East Engineering
Building between January 9 and January 14 for instruction.
To avoid misunderstanding and errors each student should re-
ceive notification from his instructor of the time and place of
his appearance in each course during the period January 23
to February 3.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

Conflicts and Irregular ..................Fri.,

Botanical Seminar: 4 p.m., Wed.,
Jan. 18, Rm. 1139, Natural Sci-
ence Bldg. Paper: "Studies in the
Botany of Mexico" by Rogers Mc-
Vaugh. Open meeting.
Forestry 160 and Forestry 265
will not meet Wed., Jan: 18.
Physical Chemistry Seminar.
Wed., Jan. 18, 4:07 p.m., Rm. 1300
Chemistry. Dr. Richard L. Stein,
of Princeton University, will dis-
cuss "Interaction of Methylene
Deformation in Paraffin-Crystals."
Political Science I, Lecture
Group A: (Prof. Barclay). Make-
up examination, Thurs., Jan. 19,
4 p.m., Rm.. 25, A.H.
Zoology Seminar: Under the
auspices of the Zoology Seminar
the movie "Within the Cell," ani-
mation of chemical processes in
cell metabolism, will be presented
Thurs., Jan. 19, 8 p.m. in Rack-
ham Amphitheater. D u r a t i o n
about 30 minutes.
Concerts
Student Recital: Jack Wilex,
baritone, will present a progranm
at 4:15 p.m., Wed., Jan. 18, in Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theater, in par-
tial fulfillment of the require-
ments for admission as a graduate
student of voice. His program, op-
en to the public, will include com-
positions by Lully, Hande, Strauss,
Wolf, Faure and Saint-Sans, as
v;ell as a group of English songs.
1;Ir. Wilcox is a pupil of Arthur
Hackett.
The Michigan Singers, Maynard
Klein, Conductor, will appear in
its first full concert on the campus
at 8:30 p.m., Wed., Jan. 18, in
L dia Mendelssohn 'Ineiter Tht
program will include compositions
by Schutz, Victoria, DePres, Pales
mna, Debussy, R':ss Lee Finney,
C.alus Chavez, Pt ir Mennin, and
Brahms.
1e - -i eral public is invited.
May Festival: The University
Musical Society announces the
following tentative schedule of
May Festival concerts:
Philadelphia Orchestra - All
Concerts. Sketches of programs
(Details later).
Thurs., 8:30-Ljuba Welitsch,
soprano. Eugene Ormandy, Con-
ductor. Mozart arias and Finale to
"Salome" (Strauss) and symphon-
ic works.
Fri.., 8:30 - Thor Johnson,
Conductor. Bach's "Brandenburg"

Concerto No. 5-Alexander Hils-
berg, William Kincaid, James
Wolfe. Walton's Viola Concerto-
William Primrose. Bach's "Magni-
ficat" - Norma Heyde, Blanche
Thebom, Harold Haugh, Mack
Harrell and Choral Union.
Sat., 2:30 - Jan Peerce, Tenor,
in several arias; orchestral num-
bers. Alexander Hilsberg, Conduc-
tor. Youth Chorus in "Walrus and
the Carpenter" (Fletcher), Mar-
guerite Hood, Conductor.
Sat., 8:30 - William Kapell, Pi-
anist, in Rachmaninoff's Concerto
No. 3. All-Russian program. Eu-
gene Ormandy, Cond.
Sun., 2:30 - Nathan Milstein,
Violinist, in Brahms' Concerto,
"Song of pestiny," and Peter
Mennin's "The Cycle" - Choral
Union; Thor Johnson, Conductor.
Sun., 8:30 - Marian Anderson,
(Continued on Page 5)
_f d

Feb. 3, 9-12

These regular examination periods have precedence over any
special period scheduled concurrently. Conflict must be ar-
ranged for by the instructor of the "special" class.
SPECIAL PERIODS

Jan. 23, 2- 5
Jan. 23, 2- 5

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

If

A4
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TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Draw. 3;
Draw. 2;

at
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8 ..........................M on.,
9 ...........................M on.,
10 ...........................W ed.,
11 ...........................Fri.,
1......... ........... .. ..Sat.,
2 ...........................W ed.,
3 ...........................Thurs.,
8 ...........................T ues.,
9 ...........................T ues.,
10 .......................Thurs.,

11 ...........................Sat.,
1 .......................Wed.,
2 ...........................Thurs.,
3 ...........................Fri.,

Eng. 11; C.E. 1, 2; M.E. 136.....*Mon.,
E.E. 5, 160; French ............. *Tues.,

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3

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Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
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Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.,
Jan.
Feb.

30,
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25,
27,
28,
1,
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26,
28,
1,
2,
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23,
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25,
26,
27,
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31,
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Fifty-Ninth Year
Edited and managed by students o
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Leon Jaroff............Managing Editor
Philip Dawson.......Editorial Director
Mary Stein.............Associate Editor
Jo Misner ............ Associate Editor
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ouusuription during the regular school

,

C.E. 22; E.M. 1, 2; German, Spanish .....*Wed.,
Draw. 1; M.E. 13, 135; Physics 45........*Thurs.,
Chem. 1, 3; C.E. 21 ................... *Fri.,
Ch-Met. 1; M.P. 3, 4, 5, 6............... *Mon.,
Economics 53, 54, 101............ . *Tues.,
Conflicts and Irregular ..................Fri.,

Evening, 12 o'clock and "irregular" classes mayi
the periods marked * provided there is no conflict.
period on February 3 is available in case no earlier
be used.

use any of
The final
period can

4
-2~

BARNARY

i.A.

U i.i E.1 1qr3LL 1

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