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January 17, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-17

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WI

PAGE SIX

F THEt MICIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1950

________________________________________________________ I______________________________________--__

WITH BALANCED BUDGET:
Ryder Ends Successful SL Semester

9 i

0t~-

By PETER..HOTTON
Running the Student Legisla-1
ture for a semester on nothing but
the grace of God was no easy mat-
ter last fall for its outgoing presi-
dent, John Ryder.
But he came through with a
balanced budget and an accept-
ance in his pocket of SL's invi-
tation to the National Student As-
sociation to hold its annual Con-
gress here next summer.
WITH THE DANGER of big red
letters on the books hanging over
his head all the time, he came out
on top of the heap with a line of
accomplishments all of which have
aided or will aid students this
year.
Ryder, a senior in political
science, has half a term to go
on SL, and, plans to work for the
things he has strived for all
through his term. One of his pet
projects has been to develop
more cabinet and committee
chairman responsibilities and
eMective continuity in the Leg-
islature.
Ryder has also worked for better

-Daily-Wally Barth
JOHN RYDER
... after a stormy SL, session
understanding of the functions
and problems of the administra-

Ifra //dt*'e 6 .. .
WITH A DRAMATIC NEW DRESS*...
/e'a i ed (, tZahcih9!

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Choose your
gown from
many styles
in rich satins,
taffetas,
nylons, and
crepes . .
in strapless
and dinner
dresses .

ion as well as other students
groups.
Ryder's term started out with a
bang last summer when a Legis-
lature - N S A delegation pushed
through the NSA Congress the
Michigan Plan, an anti-discrimi-
nation3measure that affects more
Shan 300 member schools and
1,000,000 students.
* * *
THOUGH THIS PLAN hasn't
put discrimination right off cam-
pus, it's a step toward its eventual
elimination.
Some of the bigger projects
come slowly, Ryder said of the
plan, and often we don't have
anything substantial to put be-
fore the students till that pro-
ject has been underway several
months, or even a year.
But these are the kind of things
that develop a student into the
thinking, intelligent member of
the University community, pre-
pared more fully to be the same in
the professional community after
graduation, he declared.
* * *
"BUT YOU MUST also pay at-
tention to other aspects of student
personalities," Ryder added. "A
Legislator must always take care
to stress these larger projects, but
he must also pay attention to the
little things, such as pep ralles
and school spirit."
In accordance with this pol-
icy, Ryder headed a special dele-
gation before school started this
year which talked the Athletic
Department out of its "no-
group - seating -at - football -
games" policy, an accomplish-
ment which allowed individuals
and groups to sit together in the
stadium.
Ryder's prediction at his elec-
tion last spring that SL would
broadcast part of its affairs came
true when both WHRV and WPAG
broadcast regular reports of SL
activities and election procedures
and features.
* * *
MEMBERS OF SL and the NSA
Committee also aired the Michi-
gan Plan over Detroit's CIO-own-
ed WDET-FM.
Former President Ryder's philo-
sophy on membership on SL is
that it not only gives students a
chance to be of service to the Uni-
versity, but provides excellent ex-
perience personally and in working
with people, compromising one's
ideas and opinions, and provides
an unprecedented opportunity to
meet members of the faculty and
administration on a more equal
basis.
"If I had to do it over again,
I'd jump at the chance," Ryder
declared.
Russian Film
To Be Shown
A runty little horse with super-
natural powers finagles his small
master into the job of boss of the
czar's stable in the Russian film,
"The Magic Horse," which will be
shown at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Fri-
day and Saturday in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
The technicolor film has been
acclaimed "an interesting fantasy
which shows many aspects of Rus-
sian culture-especially interesting
to language and culture students,"
by Mrs. W. Leopold, Russian lec-
turer at the University.
Accompanying the R u s s i a n
movie will be a short story of the
life of Rubens, analysing the mas-
ter's work and comparing it with
the work of other painters.
Tickets may be purchased from
2 to 6 p.m. Wednesday through
Saturday at the Lydia Menbdels-
sohn Theatre. All seats will be re-
served for the two-hour presenta-

tion under the sponsorship of the
Art Cinema League.

Dimes Film,
Features 'U'
PolioVictim
Infantile paralysis has no age
limit-it strikes adults as well as
children.
Roger Hollenbeck, former art
instructor at the University is a
case in point.
HOLLENBECK, who is appear-
ing for the second time in the
March of Dimes Campaign movie,
contracted polio in the fall of 19-
48, shortly after he had moved
with his wife and three children
to California to teach at the Jep-
son Art Institute.
When he acted in last year's
campaign movie, Hollenbeck was
allowed out of his iron lung for
only short periods each day.
Now, according to Prof. Grov-
er D. Cole, of the School of Archi-
tecture and Design, who is a for-
mer colleague of Hollenbeck's, the
young artist "is out of the iron
lung permanently.
* * *
"I SAW HIM last summer,"
Prof. Cole said, 'andshe was able
to sit up in a chair most of the
time."
Hollenbeck is now allowed to
go home on weekends, Prof. Cole
added.
Hollenbeck first caught the at-
tention of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
movie studios after he completed
a set of murals for the polio foun-
dation's exhibit in New York in
the spring of 1948.
Further inquiries to the Uni-
versity following Hollenbeck's ill-
ness led to his appearance in the
1949 Campaign movie.
Law Professors
Assigmd To Bar
Two members and one former
member of the law school faculty
were among the men listed for
committee assignments in the
state bar of Michigan, according
to a list announced in Lansing.
The men are Prof. Emeritus
Edson R. Sunderland, Prof. Laylin
K. James and Prof. Russell A.
Smith.

* .

"Just one thing more,"
bade Pompadour,
- --a

John Mason Brown, critic, auth-
or and editor, will discuss current
plays and books in his "Broadway
Review" at 8:30 p.m. Thursday at
Hill Auditorium.
Brown, associate editor of the
Saturday Review ofoLiterature,
will be making his fourth conse-
cutive appearance as a speaker in
the University's Lecture series.
FOR MANY YEARS, Brown has
had the reputation of predicting
correctly more hits and flops than
any other Broadway appraiser.
He is the author of many
books on the theatre as well as
on hisaown experiences. Among
them are "Two on the Aisle,"
"The Modern Theatre in Re-
volt," and "Seeing Things."
Tickets for his talk will be on

MINER RESCUED-Joseph Burda, 30 years old, of Morei, Pa., is
carried to waiting ambulance by rescuers, after being trapped for
19 hours in his independent mine 75 feet underground. His broth-
er, entombed 15 feet below him had not yet been reached.

StctrninCalls
Cornmunism
Foe OfChurch-
"The church has many new
enemies in the modern world, and
one of the most serious is com-
munism with its pagan philoso-
phy," The Rev. John S. Staxmm,
Evangelical United Brethren bishop
of Harrisburg, Pa., declared yes-
terday in Rackham Lecture Hall.
"The church is widely distri-
buted in the world today, but ex-
cept in a few areas, it is not
strongly established,"' the presi-
dent of the Federal Council of
Churches continued.
"This, together with the fact
that we seem to be entering a new
period of persecution of Christian-
ity, imposes upon us the dual chal-
lenge of intensified evangicalism
and expansion of our missionary
enterprise throughout the world."

sale at the Hill Auditorium box
office tomorrow and Thursday.
The Oratorical Association has
also announced that it is accepting
mail orders for Mrs. Eleanor
Roosevelt's talk on Jan. 25, the
last in the current Lecture series.
Dr. Francis To Be
Special Consultant
Dr. Thomas Francis, Jr., of the
public health school will serve as
a special consultant to the Com-
municable Disease Center of the
U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. R.
A. Vonderlehr, medical director
of the center, has announced.
Dr. Francis is one of the 73 spe-
cial consultants selected from all
parts of the nation.

Milton Classic
To BeAired
An adaptation of a great classic,
John Milton's "Samson Agonist-
es," will be presented by the An-
gell Hall Playhouse at 8 p.m. over
Station WHRV.
Broadcast from the speech de-
partment's Angell Hall studios, the
presentation relates in drama
form the story of Samson follow-
ing his brush-or brust-cut-with
Delila.
Directed by Merrill McClatchey
and adapted for radio by Nancy
Lee Thompson, the script includes
actual passages from the Bible.
THE
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
COMPLIMENTARY ENGRAVING
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733

I Want a
blouse!"
IAI
OU*

John Mason Brown To Give
Talk On Current Plays, Books

A
f

!/{V AAssw A f{7l.11 In. gQ4D

cntES EVERY,.

See them in Detroit at J. L. HUDSON
Free boket: 'WARIkIat 1HMI". Write Judy Bond, Inc., Dept. P, 1375 Broadway, Now York 1B

Whether you prefer pastel bouf-
fonts or sophisticated blacks, you
are sure to find your special
dream-dress here.
Prices at $17.95 to $35.00.

TOWN AND COLLEGE SHOPS
302 South State Street

[ if: I

4

SALE

I

TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY
We have 34 ALL WOOL FLANNEL SUITS
that formerly sold for $50.00 and $55.00
There is nothing wrong with any of them except they
are a little dark for SPRING and SUMMER.
If you need a good wearing school suit at a price that is not as high
as most sport coats . . . don't pass up this bargain!
THE SALE PRICE ? ? ? ?

I

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