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January 13, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX"

THE MICHIGAN ]DAILY

rIDAY, JANUARY 1?, 1950

M

SIGNS OF THE FLAPPER ERA:
Flamboyant Ads Enticed Movie Fans

* * *

By BOB SOLT
" What does every girl want?
Freedom! . . . and beautiful
clothes, a car, jewelry, happiness,
and satisfaction of a million de-
sires.
"But for certain, there is one
thing every girl in town wants
To see 'Girls Gone Wild!'"
Twenty years ago movie ads like
the one above were printed in
The Daily by local "sound empo-
riurn" managers to entice sheiks
and flappers on the campus to
the local flicker shows.
WITH GLOWING catch-words,
these movie blurbs assured stu-
dents that they would "behold
moonlit lagoons, whispering palms,
and untamed, unmasked love when.
Ramon Novarro as 'The Pagan'
depicts thousands of thrills that
are beyond imagination!"
No doubt there are some Uni-
versity professors on the campus
today who can recall back as far
as 1918 when a movie ad publi-
cized "Cleopatra" with Theda
Bara in the starring role as the
"most stupendous, sumptuous,
and sensational film spectacle
on earth."
* It's a movie like a scarf heavy
with legends of antiquity," the ad
continued, "and rich with the lux-
uries and splendors of unbridled
revelry-with smells of fire, a
longer kiss, a little bliss, and a ser-
pent hiss."'
* * *
FAIREST of all publicity game
for early movie promoters were
erring college girls of the "'lost
generation." ,
"The Wild Party" starring
Clara Bow was one of the social
commentaries of the times in
which misguided coeds were de-
scribed as "the dazzling darlings
of the dorms, victims of the
flaming passion of youth and
the cynicism of a man."
One 1929 movie rhetorician
couldn't resist using his wit to
publicize a local show about "an
average girl late for her work
but on time for her great adven-
ture! Her boy friend of the night
before was her boss on the morn-
ing after. She ignored. He im-
plored. She sophisticated, father
hesitated, son investigated! . .
What did he find out?"
* * *
AD MEN were even aware of
the value of using phrases of
homespun simplicity to attract the
attention of entertainment-seek-
ing students. After posing the
question whether the damsel in
the celluloid epic would marry her
true lve, one ad sincerely in-
quired further whether "this girl's
dreams will end at the altar, with
her love drifting again in the
careless current it knew before

-Daily-Wally Barth
FLICKER FANFARE - The flamboyancy of movie advertising in the late 20's is graphically il-
lustrated by these examples taken from the pages of The Daily. Then as now, however, one ad-
vertising trick was in use: favorable quotes from more or less famous people. For instance, a
Chicago pastor, Al. L. Duncan, is supposed to have said about "Men Not Fit To Marry," "I heartily
endorse showing it under proper conditions."

Musician's
Conference
Begins Today
2,000 Regional
Educators Meet
Approximately 2,000 music edu-
cators will converge on the Uni-
versity today for the Fifth Annual
Midwestern Conference on School
Vocal and Instrumental Music,
ending Sunday.
The Conference, "which is re-
ional in both scope and interest,"
according to Chairman William D.
Fitch, of the music school, will
bring teachers from Michigan, In-
diana, Illinois, Ohio and Wiscon-
sin. The meeting is sponsored
jointly by the School of Music,
,he Michigan School Band and
Drehestra Association and the
Michigan School Vocal Associa-
tion.
TEACHERS registering for the
conference at 8:30 a.m. today on
he third floor of the Union will
;et a chance to examine an ex-
zibit of school music supplies set
up there. Highlighted in the ex-
hibit is studio visual equipment
used in modern musical teaching.
Also present will be the Uni-
versity's All State High School
Band, Orchestra and Chorus,
which meets for two weeks each
semester at Interlochen.
Their performance will feature
music and teaching materials for
olos, bands, orchestra and chorus,
including music tosbeused in the
1950 district and state festivals.
* * *
AN UNUSUAL note in the Con-
.erence will be provided at 3 p.m.
in Harris Hall, when Robert Zild-
ian will lecture on the history of
.ymbals. Zildjian and his family
mvere cymbal makers in Turkey,
ind have been manufacturing the
iercussion pieces for 15 years in
his country.
Concluding today's sessions,
Dean Earl V. Moore, of the mu-
sic school, will preside at a ban-
quet meeting at 6:15 p.m. in the
League Ballroom, at which
James L. Mursell, head of the
department of music at Teach-
ers' College, Columbia, will
speak on "The Central Empha-
sis in Music Education."
The University Clarinet Quartet
vill provide dinner music.
Gets Scholarship
Leonard Verduin, director of the
Campus Chapel of the Christian
Reform Church has been awarded
a Fullbright Scholarship for study
in the Netherlands and Belgium.
He will leave with his family on
7'eb. 3 for the Continent where
-e intends to do research work on
.he early history of the reforma-
ion in Flanders.
Verduin who took his M.A. in
History at the University, estimat-
ed that the trip will take nine
months.

-Daily-Barney Laschever
HOT SHOTS-Members of the University's men's and women's
rifle clubs score targets after their match, in which the men's
team defeated the women, 987 to 944. Left to right are Dale Bess-
ler, Joyce Watson, Martin Everitt and Polly Kay.
* * * *
Male Riflers k u

she found real, honest, living
love?" To find out, one only had
to see 'The Shopworn Angel,' "a
photoplay with 100 per cent
sound."
And should the student on
campus complain about weird and
bizarre movie plots of today, let
him take notice of the 1929 film
'The Barker,' starring Douglas
Fairbanks, Jr., which was adver-

* * *

WUOM Will
Present Ty
TysonToday
TY Tyson, sportscommentator
for WWJ will be heard over
WUOM at 4:30 p.m. today as part
of the WUOM dedication week
program.
He will be interviewed on his 35
years of broadcasting Michigan
football by Les Ettr, Public Rela-
tions Manager of the University
Athletic Association.
Also on the dedication week
schedule for today is a salute
from station WJR in Detroit at
10:45 p.m.
The week's events will end to-
morrow with two and one half
hours of special programs, which
will be carried by many Michigan
stations.
At least 13 alumni who stud-
ied radio under Prof. Abbot, di-
rector of the broadcasting serv-
ice for 25 years, will be here
to participate in a variety show
from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Steve Filipiak, announcer and
disc-jockey for WHRV will be
master of ceremonies for the show.
The day's events will wind up
with a formal dedication program
from Hill Auditorium at 4 p.m.

tized as depicting "the real life, public relations man of today will'

stark unadorned, where a Hula
Queen fights for the right to be
loved, a snake charmer turns
temptress and steals white kisses
from a yokel's lips, and a father
fights to keep his son straight."
COMPARING these movie ads
of 1920 and 1950, the majority of
students may agree that publicity
styles have changed so that the

hesitate to gush about "a poignant
tale of tippling Thomas and his
tainted Teresa."
But perhaps just as many stu-
dents willalso agree that the old
publicity angle about a movie be-
ing "a colossal epic with saints,
sinners, and some sex" is still the
main drawing card used by the
movie ad men of today.

PROF. DWYER'S DILEMMA:
Exam Scheduling Called Tough

VictoryOve
It's still a man's world, buti
sometimes they have a hard time1
proving it.
At least that's what the Univer-
sity Rifle Club thinks after ekeing
out a close victory over a coed
team Wednesday night.
Composed of a small group of
enthusiastic men, the club is try-
ing to put riflery here on a par
with other Big Ten schools.
MICHIGAN is the only school
U' Museums
To Display
MarineExhibi t
Exhibits featuring marine life
of the past and present will be on
display from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. today
at the University Museums.
Three motion pictures, "The
Sea," "Born to Die," and "The
Snapping Turtle" will be shown at
7:30 p.m. in Rm. 3024 of the Mu-
seum.
* * * '
THE MARINE LIFE surround-
ing a coral reef during the De-
vonian period of 300,000,000 years
ago, and that of present day Ber-
muda reefs is contrasted in a pair
of displays created by artist Geo-
rge Marchand.
Intricate glass models are on
display of the many inverte-
brate animals of the seas, such
as shell-less marine snails and
sea squirts.
A column case of shelled gas-
tropods shows the wide diversity
of form in a single group of marine
invertebrates.
The Alcove of Michigan Corals
on the second floor has specimens
of the coral formed by animals
who swarmed the seas that cover-
ed Michigan millions of years ago.

r 'U' Coeds
in the Western Conference which
has no rifle team representing it.
"It's a hard struggle," Samuel
Kalow, club secretary said. Be-
sides keeping ahead of the wom-
en, the club has had to over-
come a general lack of knowl-
edge about target shooting on
the part of the general public,
he explained.
"A target shooter uses entirely
different equipment than the aver-
age hunter," Kalow continued.
"His rifle is much heavier, weigh-
ing about 12 or 14 pounds. It's a
.22 caliber weapon."
ALL COLLEGIATE shooting is
gallery or short-range work and
matches are fired on a 50 foot
indoor range. The course of fire
covers three positions: prone,
kneeling and off-hand (standing).
Ten shots are fired in each posi-
tion.
Each shot has a possible value
of 10 if it hits the bullseye. Thus
a perfect score would be 300 or
a "possible," in shooting jargon.
The club fires every Wednesday
night on the ROTC rifle range.
They have already shot five pos-
tal matches with other college
teams around the country, losing
only to the Universities of Wash-
ington and Wyoming.
WASHINGTON WON the Na-
tional Intercollegiate Champion-
ships last year.
But though the struggle has
been an uphill one, things are be-
ginning to pay off for the club.
ANN ARBOR

v[

By DOLORES LASCHEVER
The life of an exam man is not
an easy one.
No matter how fairly he spaces
examinations, he is open to criti-
cism from a part of the student
body - and sometimes the faculty.
His is one of those proverbial
"thankless" jobs.
* * *
THE FIRST SEMESTER hasn't
been so bad, according to Prof.

Paul Dwyer, of the mathematics
department, who, with Prof. C. F.
Kessler, of the engineering school,
makes up the exam schedules.
"These exams can be spread
over two weeks making the dis-
tribution and the amount of
time between exams less of a
problem than in the second se-
mester," Prof. Dwyer said.
He explained that in recent
years, with the increased enroll-
ment, it was necessary to speed
up the schedule of second semester
exams to enable the technical side
of commencement, exercises to be
completed.
"THE OBJECTIVE was to place
examinations for all courses in
which seniors and graduate stu-
dents were enrolled in the first
week of the exam period."
But difficulty arose, Prof.
Dwyer pointed out, because sen-
Toper Film
To BeShown
"Topper Takes a Trip," the
comic tale of a retired banker
pursued by facetious ghostly
friends, will be shown at 7:30
p.m. and 9:30 p.m. today and to-
morrow in the Architecture Audi-
torium.
Featured in the film are Roland
Young and Constance Bennett,
plus Asta-the disappearing dog.
The plot, a twist on the old tri-
angle, gets tired Topper involved
in a divorce suit, with a disappear-
ing lady ectoplasm as the corres-
pondent.
Tickets for the film may be
purchased from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m.
in the Administration Building, or
before each performance.

iors were enrolled In almost
every course on the curricula.
"A committee is now studying
the whole problem of commence-
ment exercises," Dr. Frank E. Rob-
bins, assistant to the president,
said.
* * *
HE EXPLAINED that the com-
mittee was formed after the fac-
ulty of the literary college asked
for some relief following a discus-
sion of the expedients used in re-
cent years to enable the completion
of commencement records.
Dr. Robbins pointed out that
something can be done either
about commencement exercises
or about exams.
"Plans for commencement are
now under construction," he ad-
vised, suggesting that graduation
exercises would probably be modi-
fied to provide relief from the
stepped-up exam schedule.
AS FOR THE actual making out
of an exam schedule, however,
Prof. Dwyer said it is too diffi-
cult.
"We have to provide periods
for the first seven hours on Mon-
day and Tuesday," he explained.
"As for the irregular classes -
those at noon, at 4 and 5 p.m. and
in the evening - we set aside a
few periods and let them take care
of themselves."
"If this were all we had to do,"
Prof. Dwyer continued, "the sched-
ule would be easy. But some de-
partments need to give uniform
exams.
He said that in cases where a
department or a professor desire
changes in the schedule, they are
referred to the exam committee,
consisting of Dean Charles H.
Peake, Prof. Kenneth Jones, aca-
demic counselor of the literary col-
lege, and Prof. Dwyer, chairman of
'the committee.

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"TOPPER TAKES A TRIP"
TODAY and Saturday . . . 7:30 and 9:30
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
Advance Sale 1 to 5 P.M. . .. Administration Bldg.

I

THE
UD AU PEST STRING
QUARTET
Tills OUTSTANDING CHAMBER MUSIC
GROUP OF OUR TIME
Hear theni this week-end at the
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playing in your own home on
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Here are some Columbia LP Records by
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DEBUSSY: QUARTET IN G MINOR
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MOZART: QUARTET NO. 1 IN G MINOR
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with George Szell, Pianist
MOZART: QUINTET IN C MINOR
MOZART: QUINTET IN D MAJOR
with Milton Katims, Violist
Each $4.85
The Columbia catalogue is especially rich

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