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January 12, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-12

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DALY

S

', TIISDAVY, JANUARY 17., 19'-a

.9 9 =- -

ATOMIC COMMUNITY:
Los Alamos Safer Than

Most Townsm
By FRANCES LITTLE
"Los Alamos is much safer than
most communities its size in the
United States," Raemer E. Schrei-
ber, physicist staff member of the
Los Alamos atomic research sci-
entific laboratory, declared in an
interview yesterday.
He and his fellow staff member,
Vernal Josephson, were in Ann
Arbor interviewing doctorial can-
didates interested in working at
the laboratory.
THE NEW MEXICO town, with
a population of about 9,000, has
about the eighth best fire record,
for its size, in the country, Schrei-
ber reported. There is much less
crime, because all residents have
been investigated to insure that
they have no criminal record and
have "stable characters."
As to risk of explosion, "if
anything is more dangerous than
riding to Santa Fe, 32 miles
away, we don't do it,",he assert-
ed.
"There has been no serious ac-

-Physicist

U' Symphony t
To Play for
LocalChildren
The children of Ann Arbor will
be treated to some serious music
when the University Symphony
under Wayne Dunlap gives its
children's concert at 3 p.m. today
in Hill Auditorium.
The concert, narrated by Harold
R. Etlinger, '50, will begin with a
trio of musical numbers in the
classical vein - Mozart's Overture
to "Cosi Fan Tutte," his "Sym-
phonie Concertante for Violin and
Viola" and his "Symphonie Con-
certante for Oboe, Clarinet, Horn
and Bassoon.
Following, the group will sing
"America the Beautiful," and the
orchestra will play the "Toy Sym-
phony" by Haydn.
Etlinger will then narrate "Tub-
by the Tuba" -- the orchestra ac-
companying.
At the end of the concert, the
audience will get a chance to hear
something modern in Vaughn Wil-
liams' Overture to "The Wasps."
The concert is open to pupils
from the fourth grade through
high school and admssion is by
ticket, awarded by the various
schools. Teachers will be along to
chaperone the groups.
There will be a limited number
of seats in the second balcony for
the public - but parents should
not expect to be admitted by ac-
companying young children.
UWF Elects
Carl Markle, Grad., was elected
president of the United World
Federalists list night at the Un-
ion. He succeeded Florence Baron,
'50

cident in the laboratory since
1946."
Schreiber emphasized that the
community is not so abnormal as
outsiders believe. "People there
are as ornery as people anywhere,"
he proclaimed.
SECURITY REGULATIONS areE
at a minimum outside of the
plant. All residents have a per-
manent pass, which is shown at
the main gate when entering or
leaving the "hill."
Except for the restricted area,
which requires a special badge
for entrance, residents have com-
plete freedor in the town, he
said. There are no restrictions
on social visitors, except that a
form must be filled out for them.
All homes and stores are gov-
ernment-owned, rented from the
Atomic Energy Commission, he ex-
plained. "Standard rents" are
charged, ranging from $30 to $75 a
month for apartments with one to
four bedrooms. Those who want
to own their homes may do so in
the Rio Grande valley, 20 miles
away.
LOS ALAMOS people are young-
er than most; their average age
is in the early thirties, according
to Schreiber. Consequently, there
are a great many children, espec-
ially between six and eight years
old.
"There are many advantages to
living in Los Alamos. Not only is
it one of the safest plaoes, with
little danger of theft or fire, but
there are no door-to-door peddlers
and no unemployment," Schreiber
concluded.
Speech Class
OfferedAgain
"Practical Public Speaking," a
University extension course, is be-
ing given again here, because of its
great popularity, Mrs. Charles A.
Fisher, supervisor of class pro-
grams for this area, has announ-
ced.
Two sections will open at 7:30
p.m. today in Rms. 4203 and 4003
Angell Hall.
Prof. G. E. Densmore, chairman
of the speech department, and
John J. Dreher, a member of the
department, will conduct the
classes. Students will make short
extemporaneous speeches at nearly
every class meeting.
A 16-week course, it gives no
academic credit. Those interested
may enroll at the Extension Serv-
ice Office, 4524 . Administration
Bldg., or at the first class meet-
ing.

Olsen To Be
Magazine's
FirstEditor
Top Staff Picked
For 'Generation'
Charles Olsen, '51, has been
chosen managing editor of "Gen-
eration," the new arts magazine.
Other 'members of the quarter-
ly's first editorial board are Jane
Spekhard, Grad., associate editor;
Norm Gottlieb, '50, business man-
ager, and Jack Corcoran, '50, lay-
out editor.
* * *
HEADING THE departments of
the various arts are Louis Orlin,
Grad., and Carol Orlin, Grad., lit-
erature; Wily Hitchcock, Grad.,
music; Dan Waldron, '51, drama;
Bob Andrews, '50, art; and Murray
Gitlin, '50, dance.
Other positions on the board
are still open. Students in all
the arts are needed for work on
the staffs of the various depart-
ments, especially those of music,
drama, dance and art, according
to Olsen.
A tryout meeting for those in-
terested in working on the busi-
ness staff will be held at 4:15 to-
morrow in the conference room of
the Student Publications Bldg.
STUDENTS ARE needed to work
in magazine advertising, layout,
design, selling and circulation,
Gottlieb said.
Some of the openings will be
paying positions, he announced.
The deadline for fiction, essay
and poetry contributions is Jan.
26. These should be turned into
Marvin Felheim of the English
department, Rm. 2213 Angell
Hall. Contributions will be re-
turned after publication, Olsen
said.
Sponsored by Inter-Arts'Union,
"Generation" will appear on cam-
pus for the first time March 17 in
conjunction with the IAU Student
Arts Festival.
To Hold Speech
Dept. Coffee Hour
Speech department students and
faculty members will be the guests
at a coffee hour from 4 to 5 p.m.
today in the Terrace Room of the
Union.
THE
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
COMPLIMENTARY ENGRAVING
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733

ASSOCIATED
POC TURE

- "*"*7*_....

PRESS
N ESvN

;'t

S M U T S O B L I G E S-Field Marshal Jan Christian Smuts
of South Africa passes cakes to Lady Samuel, wife of Britain's
Liberal party leader, at a reception in Smuts' honor in London.

T V A C O A L P I L E - Coal pile at Tennessee Valley Authority's Watts Bar Dam, Spring City,
Tenn., is estimated at 425,000 tons. TVA's total 615,000 tons is 1.54 per cent of coal above ground.

r

C A N D Y - B A R P A I NT E R - Six-year-old Nishida
Hiroshi, who paints only when bribed with candy bars, works at
his home in Tokyo wherel he will have an exhibition in the Spring.

C L E R I C A L P A I N T E R - The Rev. Omer J. Chevrette works on "Peter's Denial," one of
thirteen frescoes he has completed for the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Fitchburg, Mass.

. °

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c By the World's Great Artists
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Budapest String Quartet 6.00
QUARTET NO. 2 in G, OP. 18, No. 2
(Beethoven) DM601 0
Budapest String Quartet 4.75 q
QUARTET in F, OP. 135 (Beethoven) DM1253q
Paganini String Quartet 4.75
SEXTET IN AOP. 48 (Dvorak) DM340q
Budapest Quartet, Hobday and Pini_ 600
QUARTET NO. 8 in E MINOR (Beethoven) DM340
Budapest String Quartet _ 6.00
HAYDN SOCIETY SETS, Vols. III & V DM525, 527
Pro Arte Quartet 9.75
QUARTET IN F, K. 590 (Mozart) DM348 o
Budapest String Quartet 4.75
QUARTET NO. 17 "THE HUNT" (Mozart) DM7630
Budapest String Quartet- 4.75
QUINTET IN A "TROUT" (Schubert) DM312
Pro Arte Members and Schnabel 7.25
Choose your chamber music from a broad library of out-
standing RCA VICTOR RECORDINGS. We will be glad c
to help you in your selection. 0
IAusic on rne sis a hIe(szure as well as a business"

6

WEAVING THROUGH COLLEGE--Richard C.
Barret, World War II veteran and Middlebury, Vt., College senior,
works'at his home-made loom to help pay his way through college.

J U N I 0 R'S O F T H E B A L L E T - Selected candidates for the Royal Danish Corps de
Ballet start their training at the age of seven in a class of the Ballet School at Copenhagen.

Presented by
ART CINEMA
LEAGUE
A.I.M.
7:30 and 9:30
Friday and Saturday

.:* ~ -

I

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