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January 11, 1950 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-11

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t

PACE SIX

! THt RICIIIGAN DAILY

I
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11. 1950

.P.i+4u . SrIX a a

TT Dl J t Ay# JAINJL1AILV1 A,1 OV

FEATURES ALL-STAR CAST:
Curtain To Rise on 'The Traitor' Tonight

I f

*
.1

By NANCY BYLAN
An all-star cast will appear in
the speech department's presenta-
tion of Herman Wouk's "The
Traitor," a modern melodrama
about the atomic bomb and aca-
demic freedom, which will open
for a four night run at 8 p.m.
today in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Celebrating her tenth major
role in Play Production, Margaret
Pell, '50, will be cast as Jane, an
intelligent young lady who finds
herself torn between love and po-
litical convictions.
* * *
MISS PELL has previously ap-
peared in "Summer Solstice,"
"Abe Lincoln in Illinois," "Tovar-
ich," "The Emperor's New
Clothes," "Ah Wilderness," "Life
With Father," "The Trojan Wom-
en," "Servant of Two Masters"
and "Family Portrait."
Richard Etlinger, '50, will
play the part of Dr. Emanuel,
the venerable philosophy pro-
fessor, who is faced with the
problem of choosing between
ethical and political principles.
Etlinger has given performanc-
es as the Russian Commissar in
"Tovarich," the sea captain in
"Twelfth Night" and the Russian
comic in "You Can't Take It With
You." He has also done profes-
sional work in radio and televis-
ion and worked with summer
stock at Hunter College in New
York.
NOT ALL the leading players

-Daily-Carlyle Marshall
DRAMATIC MOMENT-Dr. Emanuel offers some words of wis-
dom to his young friend, Prof. Carr, the atomic scientist, in a
crucial scene from "The Traitor," while Carr's fiancee, Jane,
places a comforting hand on his shoulder. Left to right are
Richard Etlinger, Jack Beauchamp, and Margaret Pell. The
play, which marks the speech department's final production of
the semester, will be presented at 8 p.m. today through Saturday
at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Written by Herman Wouk, "The
Traitor" deals with problems concerning the atomic bomb and
academic freedom.
* * * *

Ulir Ski Club
Opens Meeting
To Enthusiasts
Student skiing enthusiasts are
invited to attend a meeting of the
Ullr Ski Club at 7:30 p.m. today
in Rm. 3K of the Union, according
to John Lauer, president of the
group.
"The Ullr Ski Club is open to
anybody who is at all interested
in skiing, whether they're experi-
enced skiers or not," Lauer said.
The skiers will make a trip to
Boyne Mountain this weekend,
'according to Lauer. They will
leave Hill Auditorium at 5:30
p.m. Friday, and return Sunday
night.
A second trip is planned for
sometime between semesters, to
another ski center, Lauer said. As-
pen, Colo., the Laurentians in Can-
ada, and Boyne Mountain are
amolng the locations being con-
sidered.
Interested students who cannot
attend today's meeting should call
him at 217 Prescott House, 2-4591,
Lauer explained.
Petitions Available
For Men's Judic
Today is the last day to pick up
petitions for three posts on Men's
Judiciary Council.
Petitions may be obtained from
3 to 5 p.rp. in the Administration
Building lobby, according to Hugh
Greenberg, appointments chair-
man.
A special Student Legislature
appointments board, comprised
of male SL cabinet members
and president of Men's Judic,
will review petitions and inter-
view applicants later in the
week, he said.

are old-timers, however. Jack
Beauchamp, '51, will make his
debut in the role of Prof. Carr,
the brilliant atomic scientist who
believes that world peace can be
obtained only through universal
sharing of the atom bomb.
Cast as the harried Naval In-
telligence Officer is Victor Hur-
witz, Grad. His stage record on
campus includes roles in "The
Potboilers," "Abe Lincoln in
Illinois," and "Twelfth Night."
He has also played in "The Manj
Who Came to Dinner," "You Can't

Take It With You" and "George
Washington Slept Here."
THE ROLE of the high-level
spy will be taken by Ed Johnston,
Grad. He has previously appeared
in "The King's Henchman," "The
Winslow Boy" and "As You De-
sire Me," and has done summer
stock work in Virginia.
Tickets for "The Traitor" will
be sold from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
daily at the Lydia Mendelssohn
box office. There will be student
rates for the first two perform-
ances.

Quartet Set
To Launch
ifusic Series
The Budapest Quartet will give
the first of three concerts in the
Choral Union's annual Chamber
Music Festival series at 8:30 p.m.
Friday in Rackham Auditorium.
Acclaimed by many critics as
the finest chamber music group
in the world, the Quartet will play
selections by Haydn, Mozart,
Brahms, Beethoven, Schubert,
Hindemith and Piston during its
three-day stay in Ann Arbor.
* * *
THE QUARTET made its debut
in the United States in 1920, first
at Cornell University and later in
New York city, with immediate
success. It then toured the
country, receiving high praise and
gaining popularity with each con-
cert.
The New York Herald Tribune,
commenting on one of the group's
more recent appearances, de-
clared:
With the Quartet, technical
perfection was a point of de-
parture, rather than one of at-
tainment . . . they seemed to
have been capable of achieving
an ineffable lightness of tex-
ture, flexibility of tempo and
nuance, and control of great
sonorities, as was required by
the inherent demands of the
music."
CHAMBER MUSIC, considered
by many to be the highest form
of music, originated in the 18th
Century, with .Hungary's Prince
Esterhazy's commission for Haydn
to write and play quartets for the
Count.
Modern quarter playing be-
gan in 1902, when Edward J.
de Coppet, a New York broker
and music patron, provided a
musical retreat and backing for
four instrumentalists at his
Swiss "Villa Flonzaley" estate,
thus organizing the "Flonzaley
Quartet," first famous modern
string group.
With the disbandment of the
"Flonzaley Quartet" in 1929, the
Budapest String Quartet was
generally credited with being the
finest chamber music group in
existence.
A limited number of tickets,
both for the whole series and for
single concerts, remain and may
be purchased at the Choral Un-
ion office, Burton Tower.
Viennese Author
To Speak Today
Peter F. Drucker, Viennese au-I
thor, teacher and economist, will
speak on "The New Society" at
7:45 p.m. today in Rm. 130, Busi-
ness Administration Building.
Drucker's lecture, sponsored by
Delta Sigma Pi, will deal with the
American mass production era and
the consequences of its products.
The social, economic and political
life of industrial management
will be stressed.

O

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
AND MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS-Siggie and Anna argue
with Papa Bonaparte in a scene from "Golden Boy," now in re-
hearsal. Left to right are Harvey Stuart, Betty Lou Robinson
and Bill MacKenzie. The play will be given by Student Players
Feb. 17 and 182 at Pattengill Auditorium..
*' * *~ *
'Golden Boy' Cast Undaunted
In Spite of Production Snags

By DON KOTITE
Skyrocketing coffee prices have
been nipped in the bud, but some
vacuum-packed brands still sell
for as much as 85 cents per pound,
a check of local groceries has
shown.
Ever since rumors of an acute
nationwide coffee shortage, nearly
two months ago, had thrown the
See EDITORIAL, Page 4
java-drinking public into near
panic, retail dealers from Maine to
California have reported price
jumps of from 20 to 30 cents more
than usual costs.
* * *
SENATOR GUY GILLETTE (D.
Ia.), chairman of a Senate agri-
culture subcommittee which has
been investigating sharp rises in
prices of coffee and other com-
modities, explained the situation
this way:
American coffee-lovers paid
an extra $650,000,000 for the fa-
vorite brew as a result of "man-
ipulation" of the coffee market
curing October and November.
He added, however, that the al-
leged market rigging was "appar-
ently not illegal," and that the
"skyrocketing of prices has been
stopped."
* * *
EVEN IN Ann Arbor, dealers and
restaurant owners had told The
Daily of repeated queries fired
at them by customers weary of
stretching pursestrings to keep
their coffeepots percolating.
Some restaurant owners blam-
ed bad weather conditions in
coffee-producing r e g i o n s in
South America; others pointed
a finger of guilt at hoarding by
housewives.
"A corner on the market," sub-
stantiating Sen. Gillette's claim,
was cited by one eatery manager.
Additional reasons included a cof-
fee boom in Europe and discontent
among low-paid workers, lured to
other jobs with promises of higher
salaries.
* * *
MEANWHILE, students at Mi-
chigan State College have found
a way to beat the coffee enigma.
Their "angel"-an East Lan-
sing pharmacist-offers cups of

Java for three cents a throw,
during MSC's eight exam weeks
yearly.
"We don't mhake any money on
the stuff, no matter what," he der
clares," and students drink more
coffee during exams than any
other period. What have I to lose?'
To advertise their good for-
tune, several students have,
strung up posters throughout the
campus, stating:
"Hey, hey, Uncle Fud--Seyfa
fert's selling three-cent mud!"

MYSTERY CLEARED:
Winchell House Learns Story
Of Namesake's Backgoround

4

Poor Papa!

Undaunted by illness and other
calamities that have taken a toll
of its personnel, Student Players
are busy continuing work on their
production of "Golden Boy," to
be presented Feb. 117 and 18 at
Pattengil Auditorium.
Burt Sapowitch, '51, producer of
the play, emphasized that pro-
duction is "rolling along." "We
Union to Fete
2 Departments
Students and faculty members
from two literary college depart-
ments will be the honored guests
at Union coffee hours this week.
The political science depart-
ment will take the spotlight when
its coffee hour is held from 4 to
5 p.m. today in the Union's sec-
ond floor Terrace Room.
Faculty and students from
the speech department will con-
verse over their coffee cups
from 4 to 5 p.m. tomorrow, also
in' the Terrace Room at the
Union.
These coffee hours have been
sponsored by the Union from time
to time during the semester to en-
able students and faculty mem-
bers to discuss mutual problems
in an informal and pleasant at-
mosphere.

even have the action all blocked
out," he said.
* * *
TWO LEADING roles and three
lesser parts have been vacated by
students who took ill over vaca-
tion or are dropping out of
school at the end of the semester.
Tryouts for these parts will be
held at 7:30 p.m. today at the
League.
The roles include Roxy, a
chubby, short cigar-smoking
trainer; Eddie Fuseli, a gang-
ster-promoter; Barker, a man-
ager; Driscoll, a boxing com-
missioner; and a call boy.
Marie Miller, wife of Prof. Free-
man. Miller of the astronomy de-
partment, has been appointed di-
rector of the play, replacing Bun-
ny Bramwell, who was prevented
by illness from continuing her
work.
Mrs. Miller has directed pro-
fessionally in Ohio, Texas and the
west coast. She has also done
work with the Ann Arbor Civic
Players and has acted profession-
ally. She is now doing profession-
al radio and television work in
Ann Arbor.
Directly after finishing work
with "Golden Boy," Mrs. Miller
will direct "Hamlet" at the Pent-
house Theatre, University of
Washington.

RISE STOPPED, BUT:
High Coffee Prices Still
Prevalent In Ann Arbor

rV

4

Song Contest
Asks Entries
Local Repertoire
Needs 'New Note'
When final exams are over, it's'
time for seniors to start singing
and writing a new Michigan song.
for the senior song contest, accord-
ing to Mary Ann Harris, general
chairman of Senior Night.
The deadline for the contest has
been moved up to February 13, "to
give students more time to recup-
erate from their finals and feel
lyrical," she explained.
Purpose of the contest is to in-
still a much-needed "new note"
in the local repertoire and to 4
provide entertainment for the
annual Senior Night, to be held
in March.
Any number of students may
collaborate in producing a song,
she said. The only stipulation is
that the song follow the tradition-
al school spirit theme. w
Entries may be turned in* at the
Undergraduate Office in the Lea-
gue.
Seclusion Beckons
COLLEGEVILLE, Minn.-0)-
A 50-year-old successful business-
man, married 25 years, entered
St. John's Abbey yesterday to
spend the rest of his life in a
monastery.
Behind him, Donald D. Foster /
left his wife, a daughter who is
a nun, and a San Francisco ca-
reer.

By BOB KEITH
Residents of Winchell House in
the West Quadrangle are no long-
er in the dark as to whom their
house was named after.
Of course they knew all along
that his name was Winchell. They
were even fairly sure his first
name was Alexander. And they
vaguely associated him with the
field of geology.
* * *
BUT NOW, thanks to the gen-
erosity of Prof. Russell C. Hussey
of the geology department, they
have acquired valuable insight into
the life of Winchell, who, it turns
out, was a noted University geol-
ogist in the late 1880's who did
much for science advancement
throughout the state.
Prof. Hussey has presented the
house with a rare volume writ-
ten by Winchell, along with a
memorial sketch of the esteem-
ed teacher which had been given
before the Geolegical Society of
America.
The sketch - reveals that Win-
chell was a crusader for more sci-
entific instruction at the Univer-
sity. He was so popular with stu-
dents that more than a thousand
jammed a general assembly hall
to hear his final geology lectures.
* * *
IT TELLS how Winchell, as di-

rector of the geological survey of
Michigan, defined the basin shape
of the state's salt-bearing depos-
its, concentrating mainly on the
"Marshall group" of subcarboni-
ferous strata.
Describing seven new genera
and 304 new species of organ-
isms, he was referred to in the
sketch as "Father of the Geolo-
gical Society of America."
Known as a strong defender of
Christian faith, he hesitantly
adopted the then new theory of
evolution on grounds that the pro-
cess derives its energy from divine
will, Winchell men learned.
They gratefully acknowledged
their thanks to Prof. Hussey for
the two documents at a recent
meeting of the house council.

-. __ ______- .-__ __ _ __ __ _ _ '.I

1

r I

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11

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35th Year

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