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January 08, 1950 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-08

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T

STJNnAF, JANUARY 9, 1950

r

THE IICHIGAN DAILY

TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY
U

SUNDAY, JANUAP~Y R, 19i~O I

I

ROYAL GAME INVADES CAMPUS:
Chess Club Imitates Modern War with 'Kriegspiel'
* * * * *. *

By EVA SIMON{
Lovers of the Republic beware!I
"The royal game" has invaded
the campus, brought by 65 students
tensely maneuvering kings, queens,
knights, bishops, rooks and pawns
over multi-checkered boards.
The chess club, founded last No-
vember by some of the more rabid
adherents to the "game of kings"
at the University, is busily polish-
ing up its strategy.
* * *
SIMULATING modern warfare
conditions under which neither
side can see the moves of the other,
several members are practicing
"Kriegspiel," a special version of
chess in which the opponents play
on two different boards.
Their sole method of com-
munication is an intermediary
who tells the players only whe-
ther their moves are legal.
However Clair Richardson, Grad.,
president of the chess club, staun-
chly denied that the purpose of
the group is to instigate a royal-
ist insurrection, pointing out that
Marshal Tito of Yugoslavia is an
ardent chess fan.
THE MAIN PURPOSE of the
club, he maintained, is to develop
a chess team comparable to those
at Eastern colleges, which will be
able to represent the University
in intercollegiate competitions.
Honors have already been won
for the University by Mark Eu-
cher, '53,who won seventh place
in a field of 41 in the national
intercollegiate chess tournament
held over the Christmas holidays.
Eucher held third place till he
was beaten in the last round by
the national champion.
Richardson asked all interested
students, regardless of their poli-
tical beliefs, to attend the next
meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in
the Union.
At this meeting the club will
'start a tournament to rate players
preparatory to picking a chess
team.
The group plans to arrange ex-
hibition matches by chess masters
and to compete against the local
teams, according to Richardson.

-Daly-Alex Lmanian
CHESS CHAMPS-Members of the chess club look on as Edwin Cohen, '52, left, wins a "rapid
transit" tournament against runner Lawrence Fuller, '51L. Players were allowed only ten seconds
for each move.
MEET MONONUCLEOSIS:
College Students Sport Own Disease

'The Traitor
To Start Run
Wednesday
Play To Be Last
Offering of Term
The speech department has se-
lected "The Traitor" as its final
presentation of the semester be-
cause its issues are timely and it
provides good post-war melo-
dramatic theatre, Prof. Hugh
Norton, director of the play, ex-
plained yesterday.
Written by Herman Wouk,
"The Traitor" will open at 8 p.m.
Wednesday for a four night run
at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
* * *
ONE OF THE chief themes of
the play concerns the problem of
academic freedom and the issues
arising over the circulation of
loyalty questionnaires in a large
Eastern university.
The conflict centers around a
much-respected professor of
philosophy who believes in ab-
solute academic freedom, but
is thrown into doubt about his
own ethical principles when he
witnesses the results of their
misapplication.
"The Traitor" is a thesis melo-
drama, that type of play which
raises problems but doesn't at-
tempt to resolve them, Prof. Nor-
ton said. "Its object is to en-
courage the audience to figure
out their own solution."
PLAYS OF this nature are
characteristic of post-war periods,
he added.
Prof. Norman E. Nelson of
the English department praised
"The Traitor" for its attempt
to present "moral issues con-
cerning all the United States
and particularly people in aca-
demic communities."
Prof. Nelson, who last summer
attacked the National Education
Association's statement calling for
the banning of communist teach-
ers, declared that Americans
must learn to discriminate be-
tween those people who are ac-
tually enemies of the government
and those whose ideas are not en-
tirely in accord with government
policies.
He deplored the current ten-
dency to suspect individuals not
living up the "the 100% Ameri-
canism of J. Parnell Thomas."
Commending "The Traitor" for
its attempt to stimulate thought
on the problem, Prof. Nelson
warned that it is not easy to
draw the line in matters of aca-
demic freedom, and even less easy
to hue to it. "The important
thing is that we be just," he con-z
cluded.

Many good jobs are available for
men and women interested in
making a career of Chamber of
Commerce and Trade Association
work, according to John C.
Beukema and Otis F. Cook.
Beukema, secretary-manager of
the Muskegon Chamber of Com-
merce, told students there is a
demand for creative persons with
a real interest in building up their
cities.
* * *
HE CITED leadership, organi-
zational skill, and judgment as
necessary qualifications for a
successful career.
Salaries in the Chamber of
Commerce vary according to the
size of the city, he said. Be-
ginning salaries in a city with
a poPulation from five to ten

t
_.

I -

CC Job Openings Still
Available Says Beukema

I

thousand are around $300 a
month. Experienced men are
paid from $6,000 to $15,000 a
year.
Cook, secretary-manager of the
Michigan Retailers Association
said there is a need for men and
women with specialized training
in trade association work, as well
as much general knowledge of
economics and political science.
The trade associations do much
more work in the field of public
relations than the Chamber of
Commerce, Cook said.
The Chamber of Commerce, as
defined by Beukema, is "an or-
ganization of the forward-looking
citizens of the community de-
voted to promoting the civil,
commercial and industrial wel-
fare of the community."

Thomas To Speak
On MonerPolicies
Woodlief Thomas, Economic
Advisor to the Board of Gover-
nors of the Federal Reserve Sys-
tem, will speak on the current
problems and procedures of mone
tary policy before the Economics
Club at 7:15 tomorrow in tho'
Rackham Ampitheatre.
~~------

PORTABLES
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By JOHN DAVIES
College students have a dis-
ease practically all their own.
It is infectious mononucleosis-
formerly known as glandular fev-
er.
** *
THERE ARE between 100 and
200 cases at the University every
year, according to Dr. Warren E.
Forsythe, head of the University
iealth Service.
It is assumed that the dis-
ease attacks college students be-
cause of their age group and the
fact that they live so closely to-
gether.

=r

7e C ia6eth t/hop
S. State St., Just off N. U.
...GREATEST

But once college students shared
the disease with a similar age
group - the army, who had an
epidemic of it at Fort Bliss a few
years ago.
* * *
ONLY FATAL IN very rare in-
stances, infectious mononucleosis
is most often characterized by a
sore throat, irregular fever and en-
larged lymph glands, according to
Dr. Chris J. D..Zarafonetis of the
University Hospital and Simpson
Institute, who has been engaged
in research on the disease.
The disease lasts from a few
days to several weeks, he added.
But many patients suffer a long
period of convalescense during
which they suffer from general
weakness and frequent fatigue,
making the problem "a significant
health, academic and economic
problem to many students and ed-
ucational institutions," according
to Dr. Zarafonetis.
* * *
DR. FORSYTHE reported that
one third to one half of the Uni-
versity students who get the dis-
ease are hospitalized.
Sulfa drugs, penicillin and
streptomycin have been tried on
infectious mononucleosis with no
benefit, Dr. Zarafonetis said.
Aureomycin and chloromycetin
are now being tried, but it is
too early to elaborate on the re-
sults, he added.
Cause of the disease, by its be-
havior, i~s generally thought to be
a virus, but since proof is lacking,
due to the difficulty of isolating

the virus, the cause is - still
known, Dr. Zarafonetis said.
* * * *

un-I

"SCIENCE HAS not been able
to artificially transmit the disease,
although experiments even on hu-
man volunteers have been con-
ducted," he continued. It is us-
ually thought of as a contagious
disease, he added.
Infectious mononucleosis is a
great actor, not infrequently
varying its symptoms from the
most common ones. It can re-
semble almost anything, includ-
ing pneumonia, jaundice and
diseases of the central nervous
system which result in paralysis.
However there are two reliable
methods of identifying the disease.
One is by observing a change in
the white blood cells.
The other involves the detection
of an antibody which develops in
the blood of patients or convales-
cents of the disease. This anti-
body causes the blood of the pa-
tient to cause a clumping of sheep
red blood cells when brought in
contact with it.
Research on the disease's cause
and cure has been in progress for
about 20 years, both in the Univer-
sity Health Service and the Simp-
son Institute, which has concen-
trated on the blood test aspects
of the disease.
General research on the disease
dates back to about 1920, when
attention was first called to the
white blood cell change.
The sheep blood test was dis-
covered in 1932, Dr. Zarafonetis
reported.

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The exclusive process that makes
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resistant than the necessary
standards for nylon hose.
Proportioned to your height as well
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In glorious new winter shades.

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(LEARN.
... continues with Still More Items
at still Greater Savings

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Blouses, formerly 4.00 to

12.95

Long and short sleeve crepes--dressy metallic blouses and velvets
in sizes 32 to 44 in white and colors.
Dresses, formerly 10.95 to 39.95
Fine wools, exquisite crepes, gabardines and taffetas-in one and
two-piece styles. sBlack and fashions' foremost colors. Sizes 9-15,
1-44 and 167/2-241/.
Handbags, formerly 5.00 to 18.50
Highest quality leather and fabric bags with rich frames and fittings.
Black or colors.
Gloves, formerly 2.00 to 7.95
Capeskin and fabrics in black, brown and colors. All top'quality.
Jewelry, formerly 5.00 to 19.95
Handcut imported rhinestones and semi-precious colored stones
. . Necklaces - Pins - Bracelets.
Nighties - Pajamas, were to 6.95
Odds and ends in flannel.
Sweaters, formerly 7.95 and 10.95
Pastel, grey and white in wool, cashmere and rabbit's hair.
Wool Skirts, formerly 5.95 to 12.95
Mostly solids.
Outstanding Values SUITS

-:'
j71 -X
I
Two-Way Stretch
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belong
to the girl
in the
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girdle
Slip on this downy-light
Wispese two-way stretch for
flattering curvesall the
way 'round! Wonderfully
easy control... wonderfully
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-t-r-e-t-c-h. Satin tummy
panel, shaped-to-you,
"fashioned-in-the-knitting"
waistline. Average and
long length. Small,
medium and large sizes.
nude * "while * blue
girdle or panty . . . 4.50
Wispese nylon-taffeta
uplift bra . . . 1.75

COLLEGE SHOP
the new spring
VERSATILER
101995
The new spring versatiler has everything! Of
fine crease-resistant rayon gabardine, it's
styled to fall in with many moods, change
personality with different accessories. From
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metal eyelets of the dyed-to-match buttons,
it's tailored and.finished with the matchless
precision and good taste that is Carol Craw-
ford's trademark.
In green, navy, rose, beige, red, light blue.

S
Dr*$$ Patedc
R*O. U. S. Pat. Off.
ryi'":{y'
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Groups of gabardines, worsted tweeds and crepes
Sizes 9-44.
Values from $49.95 to $69.95
25.00 to 35.00

of 100% wool.

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