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January 08, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 1950

TWO

TiE MICHiaTAN DAILY

____________________________ U I

I

GU' Concert
To Be Given
Next Sunday
Choir and Banel
Will Participate
The University Concert Band
will give its first concert of the
year at 4:15 p.m. next Sunday in
Hill Auditorium.
Prof. William D. Revelli, of the
music school, will conduct.
* * *
PARTICIPATING in the pro-
gram with the Band, will be the
University Choir of 240 mixed
voices under the direction of Prof.
Maynard Klein, of the music
school. The group will sing the
Coronation Scene from "Boris
Goudonov" by Moussourgsky.
Other works on the program
include the "Field Day March"
by Khatchaturian, the Overture
to "Anacreon" by Cherubini and
the "Trauersinfonie" (Funeral
Symphony) by Wagner.
CharlesaKirsch, '50M, will be
featured as solo cornetist in the
Band's performance of Goldman's
"Scherzo." Kirsch is also solo cor-
netist with the University March-
ng Band.
* * *
THE FIRST HALF of the pro-
gram will conclude with "Zanzoni,"
by Creston, and following inter-
mission the Band will play "News-
reel' by Schuman.
"'M' Rhapsody" by Floyd E.
Werle, '51M, an 4rrangement of
12 'M' songs, will also be includ-
ed in the concert. Werle is a
member of the Concert Band
and also of the University
Marching Band.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY CONCERT
Band traces its origin back 105
years when a graduate of the
class of 1844 referred to the group
as, assisting in chapel services. But
the group which first took the un-
official name of "Michigan Band"
was organized as "les Sans Souci"
in 1859 and consisted of 15 stu-
dents who made ensemble music
their hobby.
Official recognition came in
1895, when the Board of Regents
organized the Michigan Band to
play at "football games, socials and
other campus events."

Women's Editors

NEWLY-APPOINTED WOMEN'S EDITORS - Barbara Smith,
'51 (left) has been appointed associate women's editor and
Lee Kaltenbach, '50, women's editor of The Daily by the Board
in Control of Student Publications.
COLLEGE ROUNDUP-
Harvard en Abnon
Idea of SharingTubs

By DAVE THOMAS
At ivy-encrusted HarvardyUni-
versity, the flame of chivalry ap-
pears to flicker brightly still, un-
dimmed by the strains and
stresses of modern academic life.
Confirmation for this glib gen-
eralization comes directly from

Barclay To Air
Coast Politics
Prof. Thomas S. Barclay, visit-
ing professor of Political Science
from Stanford University, will dis-
cuss "Politics in the Far West in
1950" at 4:15 tomorrow in Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Prof. Barclay will analyze cur-
rent trends in western politics and
the programs of the major parties
for the election of 1950 in the re-
gion of the far west.
He will also discuss economic
changes and population increases
and their effects upon politics and
political parties in the Pacific
Coast region.
Prof. Barclay is in charge of
courses in the fields of politics
and political parties at Stanford.

i
3
f

that same outpost of cluture in the
barbarian East.
JUST BEFORE the Christmas
holidays, when New York City
was feeling the worst of the
drought and restricting such com-
parative luxuries (by Eastern
standards) as shaving and bath-
ing, solicitous Harvard students
offered to share their tubs with
waterless New York coeds.
From the dingy Harvard
Crimson offices, just off the
Yard, invitations went out to
nine womei's colleges urging
them to test Harvard hospitali-
ty and plumbing facilities. The
Crimson editors even induced a
large soap concern ,to furnish
free soap for their bathless
guests.
A few parched women actually
arrived and were photographed
diping their toes eagerly in a tub
filled with real water.
* * e

Students To
Re-Evaluate
Instructors
Previous Study
Proves Valuable
By WALT VOGTMANN
Literary college students will
again be given a chance to turn
the tables on their professors this
year in the college's second faculty
evaluation program.
Although no definite date has
yet been set for the student evalu-
ation of faculty members, Associ-
ate Dean Lloyd S. Woodburne in-
dicated that "more than likely"
it will be held during the spring
semester.
* * *
MEANWHILE, the approxi-
mately 50,000 student reports re-
ceived in last year's evaluation of
410 faculty members are still in
the process of a statistical analy-
sis.
Dean Woodburne emphasized
that the evaluation program was
a long range project which
would require evaluation results
over a period of from threerto
four years before any real
value of the program could be
realized.
Only data accumulated over a
period of several years could be
validly used as the basis for ap-
pointments, promotions and sal-
ary raises, Dean Woodburne said.
HE POINTED out that some of
the departments have already
made use of the evaluation re-
ports in such cases "when they
have confirmed some of their own
impressions."
Under the program, student
monitors from each classroom
supplied their fellow students with
a 10-question evaluation form on
which they rated the course and
their instructor on an A-B-C-D-E
scale. A space for specific com-
ments was also provided. The
evaluations were anonymous.
In addition to the student
evaluation, three or four-man
faculty committees in each de-
partment appraised colleagues on
teaching, scholarship, administra-
tive and extra-curricular work.
Mettler Urgres
'Ens ian Sales
Unless a lot of students buy
their subscriptions to the 'Esian,
there is going to be a crowd of
disappointed persons this spring,
according to Clarence Kettler '51,
sales manager for the yearbook.
The 'Ensian editors must order
the books before the end of
January, Kettler explained, and
they must base their order on
the amount of sales made to that
date.
So far, Kettler added, sales are
about what they were last year.
"If they don't show a marked
improvement, we won't be able to
order any more 'Ensians than we
did in 1949, when we could have
sold several hundred more copies
had we had them," he said.
'Ensians may b bought any
week day afternoon in the publi-
cations building, or each Wednes-
day and Thursday in the lobby of
Angell Hall, Kettler concluded.

A summary of the nation's eco-
nomic situation-the 1949 record,
outlook and recommended shifts
-shows moderate drops from 1948
to last year in five of eight depart-
ments.
Total 1949 production, $259,000,-
000,000 suffered a one percent de-
cline from 1948's booming level,
President Truman noted in his' an-
nual Economic Report to Congress.
HIS HOPED-FOR goal for this
year is a two percent increase, with
a $300,000,000,000 output forecast
within the next five years.
A near-800,000 drop from 19-
48's more than 59,400,000 U.S.
employment average, 1949's 58,-
700,000 average will be expand-
ed to 61,000,000 this year and
will rise to a 64,000 mark by 19-
55, the chief executive predicted.
But he reported total disposable
consumer incomes as $192,900,000,-
000 in '49, more than two billion
dollars higher than the previous
year. And consumer spending re-
mained constant at '48's $179,000,-
000,000 pace, with a $1,000-a-year
boost in the expected average fam-
ily income by 1955, setting it over
the $5,000 mark.

IN THE WAGE1department, 700,000,000 increase over 1948. Av-
Truman gave a $136,800,000,000 erage' weekly earnings rose from
figure for 1949, representing a $1,- $54.14 to $54.78.
>>ONS>:UMER ICQM
SPNDNG AND SAVING
....?ess xES
SAV
a
< ~. s
194 COSUMRt SPEND I yThe hat aov/shwsth
yeae l s
be for the-oubreakfW dW thp
1949 CONSUMER SPENDING -- The chart above shows the
yearly increase of total disposable consumer income from just
before the outbreak of World War II to the present.

TRUMAN'S ECONOMIC REPORT:
Total_1949 Production Shows Small Drop

Farm income, however, slipped
about 15 per cent below the pre-
vious year's levels. The Presi-
dent recommended here the ad- 4
dition of $45,00,000,000 to all
consumers' buying power by 19-
54, enabling farmiers to sell
about ten percent more food.
Corporation profits fell 21 per-y
cent below the 1948 figure in 1949,
grossing $27,600,000,000 (before
taxes and adjustments to take ac-
count of devalued inventories).
Recommendations along this line
include provision for $3 to $6 bil-
lion for business investment in the
next half decade.
The President also told Congress
that a moderate decline during the
first half of '49 brought the year's
level down to three percent under
the postwar peak.
Ice-Bound Blackbirds..
OKLAHOMA CITY--(A)-A flock
of blackbirds, frozen to the ground
today by a falling mist, were freed
by game rangers using salt and ice
picks.
The birds, about 100 of them,
were imprisoned at the edge of

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

7

T

,1

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
3 .60 1.53 2.52
4 .80 2.04 4.80
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.: for Sunday Issue.
PERSONAL
STUDENTSL-And otherwise! Attention
The Michiganensian must put
in its order for the number of 1950
'Ensians to be printed, by January 31,
1950. Please order yours today-so
that we may order your 'Ensian for
you. _ _)51P
CORRECT FOREIGN ACCENT rapidly
by international phonetic alphabet
method. Individual instruction. Cer-
tified correctionist. Phone 2-8439.
)50P
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161 ) iP
LEAVING SCHOOL
Excellent business opportunity open
for student or others. Phone 2-4126.
)49P
IELP WANTED
GIRL FOR COUNTER and fountain-
Part-time. Student's wife preferred.
5464. )22H

BUSINESS SERVICES
LEAVE JUNIOR with a reliable baby
sitter while yougo out-anytime.
Kiddie Kare, 3-1121. )35B
EFFICIENT, EXPERT, PROMPT type-
writer repair service. Moseley's Type-
writer and Supply Company, 214 E.
Washington._Phone 5888. )5B
NEARLY NEW SHOP-Fur and cloth
coats, formals, suits. 109% E. Wash-
ington, over Dietzel's. Phone 2-4669.
)27B
SHIRTS - Nine hour service (by re-
quest). Three day service (regular
service). Ace Laundry, 1116} S. Uni-
versity. )21B
WASHING and/or Ironing done in my
own home. Free pick-up and deliv-
ery. Phone 2-9020. )1B
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
Van Doren Clarinet Reeds
Box of 25 - $4.50
New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washington )4B
HAVE YOUR TYPEWRITER repaired by
the Office Equipment Service Com-
pany. 215 E. Liberty. )16B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
Established Tradition )3B
ROOMS FOR RENT
LIKE TO COOK? - Kitchen-privileged
League House has a handsome modern
room available Feb. Call Pat, 9244.
) 39R
BRING your week-end guests to the
Pierce Transit Home. 1133 E. Ann.
Phone 6415. )1R

LOST AND FOUND
RED WALLET - Finder keep money.
Please return contents. Phone 3-4452.
)17L
ANTIQUE AMYTHEST NECKLACE lost
between Nickels Arcade and State St.
vicinity Friday A.M., Dec. 23. Re-
ward. Return to Van Buren Shop, 8
Nickels Arcade orPhone 2-2914._(16L
LOST-Black billfold in Campus Drug.
Liberal reward if returned contents
intact. Phone 2-2521, Couzens Hall.
Leave message for J. Hass. )15L
REAL ESTATE
FRATERNITY
SORORITY
Two-family or rooming house. Now
being used as two family (duplex).
Can be converted very easily into
single. 17 rooms, 4 complete baths,
4 extra lavatories and toilets. Two
low-pressure steam oil burning heat-
ing plants. Building in good repair.
If you are in the market for this
type of property, make arrangements
to see it soon, as it will only be on
the market for one month. Call 2-2571.
Evenings call Mr. Newton, 6125, Fred
H. Greiner 8605 or Mr. Johnson 5920.
Brooks-Newton Realty Inc., Realtors.
__)3E
FOR RENT _
ONE SINGLE next semester. Vacancies
in Dorm Style room also. In Frater-
nity District. Call 3-4590. 1702 Hill.
)24F
FURNISHED year-round cottage for
rent. All modern conveniences. 7721
Shady Beach Drive, Horseshoe Lake.
Call Detroit, Venice 9-3088. )23F

FOR SALE
FEBRUARY GRADUATES - Your last
chance to take advantage of the stu-
dent rates on LIFE and TIME. Your
subscription can start after you grad-
uate. Student Periodical Agency. Ph.
2-82-42 to order. )3
DRAWING BOARD-Detachable chrdme
base. New condition, $10. Ph. 25-8297.
6500 Jennings Road. )40
COUSINS
on State Street
All Plastic Raincoats
extremely durable, waterproof,
and stain resistant
$4.95
Matching triangle headscarf $1.00
CANARIES, Parakeets, and Tropical
Birds. Bird supplies and cages. Mrs.
Ruffins, 562 S. 7th. Phone 5330. )2B
INVENTORY SALE
Navy "T" shirts, 45c; 100c/ wool ath-
letic hose, 49c; B-15 type jackets.
$8.88; all wool flannel pants, $6.49;
plastic raincoats, $2.49. Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington. )6
WE HAVE a complete line of films and
equipment for that new camera.
CALKINS-FLETCHER
N. University'at State Street (5
_WANTED TO BUY
$5 ROOM within three blocks Angell
Hall with bed, desk, for second se-
mester. Call Al, 2-1046. )12N
2-3 ROOM APARTMENT. NYC apart-
for exchange if desired. Married
grad, student. Ph. 8457. )13N

A.
x

wt a

s

r

ORPH EUM
Cinema Triumphs
From All The World

ENDING SUNDAY
All Seats 50c
Continuous from 1:30 P.M.

AN HISTRIONIC TRIUMPH OF THE CINEMA
., CHARLES LAM TON.*
ROBERT DONITI -MERLE OBERON
BARNES
LODER
ELSA
LANCHESTER
GOOD MICTURES LIKE GOOD OOKS NEVER GROW OLD
MINIATURES

BIGGER and better plans for
the Share-the-Shower campaign
had to be abandoned, however,
when Crimson editors discovered
that they might be violating the
Mann Act.
Legal advisors cited a Vir-
ginia court decision on the Act
in persuading the Crimson to
drop the campaign. It read,
"The Statute is violated, if the
intent is to expose the woman
to such influences as will natu-
rally and inevitably so corrupt
her mind and character as to
lead to acts of sexual immorali-
Diehard Crimson staffers dis-
patched a wire to Attorney Gen-
eral Howard McGrath, but when
no answer was immediately forth-
coming, the campus resignedly
drained its bathtubs and headed
homeward for the holidays.
Elsewhere, the process of edu-
cation went on as usual. A report-
er from the campus newspaper of
an obscure missionary college in
the provinces of New Hampshire
captured an exclusive interview
in New York with Mae West,
buxom queen of the showboards.
"A well upholstered woman just
isn't appreciated any more," con-
fided the blowsy beauty to her
Dartmouth interviewer.

. -,

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A Party Mood
Starts Right
With Good Food

'I

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1
ND

NIGHT ONLY
DAY, JANUARY 9th
ON STAGE -

MICHIGAN

BROCK PEMBERTON
presents

GOOD FOOD and
GOAT'S MILK

.-
i

in THE PULITZER PRIZE PLAY
by MARY CHASE

at

A4

at the

WAGNER'S
Restaurant
Washington and Ashley

$3.60, $3.00, $2.40, $1.80, $1.20 (tax incl.)
Tickets Now On Sale Curtain 8:30 SHARP
At Box Office No One Seated During
Open Daily 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. First Scene

a

"POLKA DOT PUSS"
Color Cartoon

NESBIT'S
PASSING PARADE

STARTING
TODAY!

c f
. .
:Y

Continuous From 1 P.M.
All Seats 60c 'ncl. Tax

DO YOU KNOW . . . that Floyd
Bevens has never pitched another
inning of major league baseball
since his one-hitter in the" 1947
World Series?
No. Main - Opp. Courthouse

ALLENEL
Ainiq doom

U

Starts Today!

Ii

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...

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a.1,11 11

F

... IT'S A SPOOKER-DOOPER!
LEO GORCEY and
THE BOWERY BOYSe

P
L
U
S

STARTS TODAY
Thru Wednesday
Matinees 30c 'til 5 - Nights 40c
16 A

r/

H IN

IL =
A MONOGRtAM PICTURE
withHUJNTZ HAIL andATLAS THlE MONSTER

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4-
::

Box Office Opens Tomorrow!

The
a star
and timely d

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rtl ing
Tama

ROBERT MITCHUM
JANET LEIGH WENDELL COREY

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CZTIlnkT DATE

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