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January 06, 1950 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1950-01-06

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,4

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1950

.._.

-U

--

i

Louis Grcrnich
IN THE DEATH of Prof. Louis Granich,
whose funeral will be held today, not
only the science of psychology but also
the University community has suffered
an irreparable loss. A number of Prof.
Granich's students who knew him best
have written the following tribute:
"The tragic death of Prof. Louis Gran-
ich has deprived us of an inspiring teach-
er and a warm friend. He was admired
not only for his insight and creativity,
but his sympathy and humor which en-
deared him to all who knew him.
"Like all truly great teachers, he be-
came an almost legendary figure. His
tremendous enthusiasm, colorful person-
ality, 'and the stimulating presentation
of ideas distinguished his work as well
as his relations with people.
"He will be remembered for his sin-
cerity, kindness, and wisdom. We will
cherish the memory of a man who was a
credit to his field and a source of strength
and pride to his students."
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
ore written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: PAUL BRENTLINGER

The CEiJ's work

OPINIONS expounded by those who con-
sider the Committee to End Discrimi-
nation an organization of radicals can be
nullified by merely listing the Committee's
activities and member organizations.
The number of organizations represented
in the CED has been growing fast since
the beginning of this semester.
When CED's petition drive began three
months ago, 14 organizations composed
CED. Now there are 32 member organi-
zations representing approximately 4,300
students.
CED membership includes the Young Re-
publicans, Young Democrats, Young Pro-
gressives, Association of Independent Men,
American Veteran's Committee, Phi Sigma
Kappa, East Quad Council, West Quad
Council.
Inter-Cooperative Council, Unit a r i an
Student Group, Hillel Foundation, United
World Federalists, Inter-Racial Association,
Students for Democratic Action, National
Lawyers Guild, Beta Mu Club, and Angell
House are also members.
The list continues 'Vith Lester House,
Hinsdale House, Anderson House, Cooley
House, Tyler House, Michigan House, Oster-
weil House, Robert Owen Cooperative House,

Stevens House. Nakamura Cooperativ:-
Council of Arts, Sciences, and Professions,
Prescott House, Winchell House.
Among the activities of CED has been
a petition drive. The Committee plans to
have a table at registration for the pur-
pose of adding to the names already ap-
pearing on the petitions.
These petitions ask support of the pur-
poses of CED which is trying to remove
questions pertaining to race, religion, na-
tional origin, and the request for a photo-
graph, from University admission applica-
tions. '
Hoping to clarify its position with of-
ficials of the University, the CED recently
met with secretary of Medical School who
is also head of the admissions board. He
admitted that it would not hamper the
admissions boa r d 'immeasurably if the
questions were removed.
This admission, coming from one of the
schools with the most discriminatory ques-
tions on its applications shows that mere
distaste for change on the part of Univer-
sity officials may be the greatest obstacle
to the removal of the questions, and that
the goal can be achieved.
-Leah Marks.

DAILY OFFICIALBULLETIN

Publication In The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on thedayapreceding publication
(11:00 a.nm. Saturdays).
FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1950
VOL. LX., No. 73
Notices
Graduate School Admission: Ap-

plications for admission to the
Horace H. Rachham School of
Graduate Studies for the second
semester will be accepted up to
and including Jan. 21. At that time
all necessary transcripts and other
credentials must also have been
submitted. Applications and cre-
dentials submitted after that date
cannot be accepted.J
Student Teaching in Elementary

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 23-FEBRUARY 3, 1950
NOTE: For courses' having both lectures and recitations,
the time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having recitations only, the time of the class
is the time of the first recitation period. Certain courses will
be examined at special periods as noted below the regular
schedule. 12 o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes
and other "irregular" classes may use any examination period
provided there is no conflict (or one with conflicts if the con-
flicts are arranged for by the "irregular" class). A final ex-
amination on February 3 is available for "irregular" classes
which are unable to utilize an earlier period.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination. In the College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination
may be changed without the consent of the Committee on Ex-
aminations.

CUN A T MOVIES

Washington
Merry-Go-Round
By DREW PEARSON
\i ASHINGTON-The Congressional furor
over Britain's impending recognition of
Communist China will not stop that recog-
nition. But out of the forensics can come
-if the State Department is on its toes-a
joint Anglo-American Council to guide the
foreign policy of English-speaking countries
in the future.
Too many times in the past Britain's tra-
ditional balance-of-power policy has let
the world drift into wars, following which
the Uiinted States has had to bail out the
British.
Up until the early 1930's, the bored and
blase policy of State Department diplo-
mats was: "In Europe and Asia, we take our
cues from Britain. In Latin America, Bri-
tain takes the cue from us."
That, of course, was in the heyday of
British power, when British banks domin-
ated world trade. and when His Majesty's
navy not only was the biggest in the world,
but a navy meant something.
Today British banks would be ronexis-
tent without U.S. help, and the British
Navy is far more impotent than the Bikini-
bombed U.S. Navy.
Thus the time would appear to be here
when U.S. foreign policy should cease to
be the tail on the British kite. Neverthe-
less, we continue to support Britain econom-
ically with no return guarantees of foreign-
policy reciprocity.
* * *
BRITAIN'S CASE HISTORY
N AN EARLIER column, I told how the
British Foreign Office secretly undercut
Secretary of State Henry L. Stimson when
he was trying to block the Jap war lords in
Manchuria. This, however, is only a small
*part of the story.
The seeds of war do not shoot up over
night. They are planted sometimes two
decades in advance, can be either nurtured
or smothered as the years pass. British
policy, or perhaps lack of policy, has some-
times fertilized, almost encouraged the seeds
of war, The British, of course, have not
meant to do this, but here is case history
on how they have blundered.
* *. *
HITLER'S INVASION OF THE RUHR-
High point of the Nazi tide of aggression
prior to the actual outbreak of war came in
March, 1936 when Nazi storm troopers in-
vaded the Ruhr and Rhineland. All day the
French cabinet debated whether the French
Army should resist. All day Paris was on
the phone to London trying to get assur-
ance of British support in case war broke.
in Europe.
That assurance never came. As a result
the French Army did not resist. Hitler took
the vast steel and coal resources of the
Rhineland, and with this arsenal under his
control, war became inevitable. After that
war was finally over, captured German
leaders revealed that Hitler had given his
troops two sets of orders before they march-
ed into the Rhineland: one to advance; the.
other to retreat the minute the French re-
sisted.
* * *
BALANCE OF POWER-The Ruhr's in-
vasion climaxed a long series of jockeying
in which the British had followed their
ancient policy of balancing France off
against Germany. Because France was
strong, they built up Germany. British
money, even British arms went to streng-
then Hitler, even at a time when it was
obvious he intended to rule Europe.
USA VS. USSR-British strength, accord-
ing to her old-fashioned diplomats, has lain
in her ability to tip the scales between the
two strongest European nations. That is
one reason the British are the chief oppon-
ents of ECA Administrator Hloffman's drive
for a United States of Europe. For, if Eur-

At The -Michigan .
BORDER INCIDENT, with Ricardo
Montalban and George Murphy.
WITH SUCH a dull, uninspired title as the
above, the movie-goer is led to expect
the name underplays a violent, hair-raising
adventure. But this particular title didn't
in the least underplay the adventure.
For this is another in the long string
of pseudo-documentaries, which get pro-
gressively more lousy with each succeed-
ing film. "Border Incident," teh narrator
claim, is based on the files of the Immi-
gration Office. With George Murphy as
the American immigration officer and
Ricardo Montalban as the Mexican border
agent, the film saches back and forth
over our south-western boundary, seekf
ing to interest the audience by frequent
change of scene.
There is not much else of interest. The
film limps through an exposition and com-

plications with the two immigration of-
ficials stalking their prey like robots
operating on remote control.
The goal of their pursuit is a ring of
smugglers, who sneak Mexican workers
across the boundary and do a rich business
in robbery and plunder of them when they
try to sneak back. Montalban and Murphy
join the group and try to catch them in the
act.
This they do, but they also catch a
lot of trouble in the process. The smug-
glers, a singularly sadistic group,, get rid
of obstacle sby mowing them down and
cutting them up with a threshing ma-
chine, or leaving them to be slowly swal-
lowed up by a hungry bog of quicksand.
The above practices are doubtless intro-
duced to wake up the audience so they'll
be attentive to the closing scene, in which
the American and Mexican flags are crossed
so that the warm glow of good-neighborly
feeling wil suffuse their disgust at the film.
-Fran Ivick.

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8.............
9.............
10 .............
11 .............
1.............
2.............
3 . . . .... . .. ....

..........Mon., Jan.
................M on., Jan.
...............W ed., Jan.
.Fri., Jan.
......... Sat., Jan.
...............W ed., Feb.
...............Thurs., Feb.

30,
23,
25,
27,
28,
1,
2,
31,
24,
26,
28,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12

8 ...................
9......................
10 ......................
11......................

.... Tues.,
.....Tues.,
.. .. Thurs.,
.....Sat.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

1 ...........................W ed., Feb.
2 ...........................Thurs., Feb.
3 ...........................Fri., Jan.

1, 2- 5
2, 9-12
27 2- 5
3, 9-12

Conflicts and Irregular ..................Fri.,

Feb.

MATTER OF FACT
by JOSEPH ALSOP

These regular examination periods have precedence over any
special period scheduled concurrently. Conflict must be ar-
ranged for by the instructor of the "special" class.
SPECIAL PERIODS

Education: Those who expect tc
do studient teaching in elementary
education in the Spring Semeste
should file application immediately
in 2509 University Elementary
School.
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS:
The U.S. Civil Service Commis-
sion announces examinations for
Junior Scientist and Engineer
grades from GS-3 to GS-7. Clos-
ing date: Jan. 31.
The Pennsylvania Civil Service
Commission announces examina-
tions for Junior Enforcement Of-
I ficer, Assistant Enforcement Ex-
aminer, and Report Examiner foi
the Penn. Liquor Control Board.
Closing date: Jan. 6.
The New York State Civil Se-
vice Commission announces exam-
inations for positions in Education
Library Science, Soils Engineering
Social Work, Occupational Ther-
apy, Dietetics, P u bl i c Health,
Photofluorography, and X-ray.
Closing date: Jan. 13. Examina-
tions also announced for Junior
Laboratory Technician for resi-
dents of Chautaugua county only.
Closing date: Jan. 13.
The Michigan State Civil Service
Commission announces examina-
tions for Library Assistant. Closing
date: Jan. 18.
A representative fi'om the De-
troit office of the Pittsburgh Plate
Glass Company will be at the Bu-
reau of Appointments on Jan. 10
to interview February graduates
for Sales Trainee positions. This
training will be conducted in the
Detroit area and will include ro-
tating assignments in the Paint
and Glass Departments in the De-
troit distributing warehouse.
Representatives from the Inter-
national Business Machine Cor-
poration will interview February
1950 graduates of the L.S.&A. and
Business Administration Schools
on Jan. 11 for their Sales Training
Program (Electric typewriter,
Time clock, and Punch card
Sales). They desire applicants
with strong interest in sales.
The Tobe-Coburn School for Fa-
shion Careers in New York an-
nounces fashion fellowships for
1950-51. Contestants must regis-
ter in January 1950 and must be
able to finance their living and in-
cidental expenses for nine months
in New York.
The Carnegie Institute of Tech-
'nology, Pittsburgh, Penn., announ-
ces Teaching Assistantships, Grad-
uate Fellowships and Research As-
sistantships for the Academic
Year 1950-51 in the following
f i e 1 d s -: ChemicaltEngineering,
Chemistry, Civil Engineering, El-
ectrical Engineering, Mathematics,
Mechanical Engineering, Metal-
lurgical Engineering, Physics.
Michigan State Civil Service an-
nounces an examination for Li-
brary Executive. Closing date: Jan.
25.
For further information call at
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Administration Bldg.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Edgar
Lindsley McCormick, English; the-
sis: "Thomas Wentworth Higgin-
son as a Literary Critic", Fri., Jan.
6, East Council Room, Rackham
Bldg., 7 p.m. Chairman, J. L. Da-
vis.
Psychology classes which meet
at 1 and 2 p.m., Fri., Jan. 6, will
be dismissed because of funeral
services for Dr. Granich.
Directed Teaching Qualifying
Examination: All students expect-
ing to do directed teaching in the
spring term are required to pass a
qualifying examination in the sub-
ject in which they expect to teach.
This examination, for all fields
other than science, will be held

at 8:30 a.m., Sat., Jan. 7. Students
will meet in the auditorium of the
University High School. The ex-
amination will consume about four
hours' time; promptness is essen-
tial. Bring bluebooks.
Students who expect' to do their
directed teaching in science (bi-
ology, chemistry, physics, general
science) will take the examination
at 1 p.m., Sat., Jan. 7, 1011 Univer-
sity High School.
Events Today
University Museums: Exhibit
halls open to students and the
public, 7 to 9 p.m. Title of Rotunda
exhibit: "Invertebrate Life of the
Alpena region, Michigan, three
hundred million years ago." Natur-
al history motion pictures: "Pu-
eblo Dwellers" and "Hopi Indians,"
7:30 p.m., 3024 Museums Bldg.
WSSF: Work party, 7:30 p.m.,
Fireplace Room, Lane Hall. All
Guild members invited. Refresh-
ments and square dancing. The
Guild has been invited to attend'
Interfaith Night tonight at B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation, 2101 Hill,
7:30 p.m. Speaker: Maynard Klein,
"Music of Church and Synagogue."
Bill of One-Act Plays presented
by the department of Speech, Ly-
ria Mendelsonhn Theatre 8 n nm

and Synagogue." Saturday morn-
ing services, 10 a.m.
Canterbury Club: Tea and Open
House for all students and their
friends, 4-6 p.m..
Quarterdeck Society: Meeting,
Rm. 3-D, Union. All members are
urged to attend.
German Coffee Hour: 3:15-4:30,
p.m., League Cafeteria. All stu-
dents and faculty members invited.
C.E.D.: 4:15 p.m., Union.
I.Z.F.A.: Executive council, 4:15
p.m., Union.
Displaced Party: Lane Hall, 9
to midnight. Wear one article of
clothing displaced. Nominal fee.
Sponsored b y Congregational -
Disciple - E&R Guild.
SRA Coffee Hour: 4:30 to 6 p.,,
Lane Hall, Library.
SRA-WSSF: Work Party, 7:30
p.m., Lane Hall. Everyone invited.,
Coming Events
Economics Club: 7:45 p.m., Jan.
9, Rackham Amphitheatre. Dr.
Woodlief Thomas, Economic Ad-
viserhto the Board of Governors{
of the Federal Reserve System,
Washington, D.C., will speak on
"Current Problems and Procedures
of Monetary Policy." Graduate
students and staff members in
Economics and Business Adminis-
tration, and other interested per-
sons invited.
Graduate Outing Club: Meeting,
Sunday, 2:15 p.m., northwest en-
trance, Rackham Bldg. to go skat-
ing or hiking. (Skating at the Mi-
chigan skating rink, 3-5 p.m., Sun-
day.)

,j

4

i

English 1, 2............................Mon.,

''I

I

WASHINGTON-These are times, it seems,
when the appearance and the reality of
politics are divorced beyond remedy. The
President's recent message to Congress, so
bland, hopeful and eupeptic, represents the
appearance. The best current symbol of the
reality is the investigation now being quietly
carried on by the American government's
highest scientific advisors and certain other
top policy-makers.
The subject of this investigation is, very
simply, the desirability of launching another
great project like the Manhattan District,
irn order to build a hydrogen bomb 1,000 or
more times more powerful than the bomb
that fell on Hiroshima. Previous reports in
this space have disclosed the debate within
the government about this hydrogen bomb
project. A fundamental issue of high policy
and grand strategy is also involved, which
must now be dealt with.
* *
THE KEY FACT about the sudden drive to
build a hydrogen bomb as soon as possi-
ble is the fact that this drive originated
immediately after the explosion of the Soviet
atomic bomb. Until then, our sole possession
of the uranium-plutonium bomb had been
a great source of confidence, not to say
complacency. In the last analysis, the
"American atomic monopoly" had been gen-
erally regarded as a sure foundation of our
security. The explosion in Siberia ended
all that.
The collapse of the "American atomic
monopoly" therefore caused an immediate
search for a substitute. The substitute is
now to be the hydrogen bomb. In the grim
competition to devise weapons of total
destruction, we are to keep just one jump
ahead. And this "American lead" is to
replace the former "atomic monopoly" as
our security's new foundation.
This idea of the "American lead" is cru-
England was quite willing to have the Sudet-
enland go to Hitler.
** *
DELAY IN INDIA-When Louis Johnson,
now Secretary of Defense, went to India as
special envoy, he worked out a compromise
with Pa'ndit Nehru by which India achieved
a certain amount of independence under
the British Empire. His plan, however, was
vetoed by Churchill.
Prior to Johnson's visit, ex-Undersecre-
tary of State William Phillips, had recom-
mended the same thing. So also had
Undersecretary Sumner Welles. None of
these gentlemen were radicals. They mere-

cially important, if only because it is the
President's chief justification for the cur-
rent impairment of our normal armed
strength, in the interests of economy. The
idea appeals to every American instinct of
optimism and self-assurance. But it none-
theless conceals a basic deception.
'LET US GRANT that maintenance of the
"American lead" is possible, despite the
almost total disarray of our research and
development program, and the total dedica-
tion of the Soviet economy to war purposes.
The direction of military invention - the
place where this "lead" will logically take us
-is towards more and more horribly de-
structive weapons, delivered greater and
greater distances, at higher and higher
speeds. Today, the researchers envision hy-
drogen bombs carried in pilotless jet aircraft
guided by automatic celestial navigation.
The imagination shrinks from what the re-
searchers may be thinking about in another
decade, provided, of course, that the whole
process has not been rudely halted in the
interval.
Furthermore-and this is central-the
explosion of the Soviet atomic bomb has
shown us, once and for all, that a "lead"
is all we can hope to maintain. Whatever
we can do, whether building a hydrogen
bomb or constructing intercontinental
guided missiles, the Soviets can at least
do later.
Even if we maintain our "lead," this proc-
ess must thus produce a totally new situa-
tion in the end. Each side will eventually
be able to destroy the other. Our weapons
may still be superior. But our society will
not permit these hideous new weapons to be
used on the mere whisper of a dictator's
order. Theirs will. Their advantage will
then be greater than ours.
THIS KIND of vision of the future-herein
simplified and crudely drawn to bring
the basic point within newspaper compass-
has led some officials to recoil in horror
from the hydrogen bomb project. Obviously,
however, if a world armaments race is on in
earnest, we cannot safely fall behind. If
hydrogen bombs are to be built, we ought
to be the first to build them.
On the other hand, the same consider-
ations have also helped to stimulate de-
mand for a new look at the problem of
international control of atomic energy.
An overture, indicating receptiveness to
suggestions, has been received from Mos-
nnr-. fim ..- n, .o . . ,. ,,, . .

Psychology 31 .................
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31,
32, 61, 62, 91, 92, 93, 153 .....
Speech 31, 32 .................
German 1, 2, 31 ...............
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ...........
Botany 1; Zoology 1 ...........
Chemistry 1, 3, 21, 55 ...........
Sociology 51, 54, 90 .............

Jan. 23, 2- 5
Jan. 23, 2- 5

......Mon.,
.........Tues.,
..........Tues.,
.. ..Wed.,
.........W ed.,
...... Thurs.,
.... . ..Fri.,
........Mon.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

24,
24,
25,
25,
26,
27,
30,
30,
31,
2,

2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-

Cercle Francais: Last meeting of
semester, Mon., Jan. 9, Hussey
Room, League, 8 p.m. Election of
officers for next semester. Re-
freshments. Everyone urged to at-
tend.
Armenian Students' Assn.: El-
ection of officers meeting, Mon.,
Jan. 9, 7:30 p.m:, Rm. 3B, Union.
Inter-Arts Union: Meeting, 2
p.m., League Sat. Room will be an-
nounced on the League bulletin
board.
Saturday Luncheon Discussion:
12:15 p.m., Lane Hall. Reservations
may be made by calling Lane Hall
by Friday.
Inter Guild Council: Sun., 2:30
p.m., Lane Hall.
Student Goes
To UN Meet
Alan Berson, '52, represented the
campus United Nations Education-
al, Scientific and Cultural Orgah-
ization at a mid-year conference
of the Collegiate Council for the
United Nations last week in New
York City.
Berson was one of 20 students
who met to exchange program
plans for the coming term and to
review accomplishments of the re-
presented groups.
The general election in Egypt,
whose first and decisive stage took
place this week, was an event of
major importance in the Near
East, even though one cannot ex-
pect any fundamental changes, at
least to begin with. Even politi-
cally, one watches for a change
in the basic pattern, only to find
that the twenty - five - year - old
struggle between the Palace and
the Wafd is still with us. It start-
ed with King Fuad and is going
strong under his son, King Far-
ouk.
-New York Times

t

r1

Political Science 1 ...................... Mon.,
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101...........Tues.,

Russian 1 .............................. Thurs., Feb.

J1

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of ex-
aminations, see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
JANUARY 23 to FEBRUARY 3, 1950
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time
of the first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209, East Engineering
Building between January 9 and January 14 for instruction.,
To avoid misunderstanding and errors each student should re-
ceive notification from his instructor of the time and place of
his appearance in each course during the period January 23
to February 3.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

4
4

4

I

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday;
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8 ............ ..............M on.,
9 ...........................M on.,
10 ...........................W ed.,
11 ...........................F ri.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
., Feb.

1 ..... .....................
2 ..........................
3 ..........................
8. .....................---
9 ..........................
10........ ................
11 ..........................
1 ..........................

.Sat.,
.Wed..
. Thurs.

30,
23,
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Fifty-Ninth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Leon Jaroff............Managing Editor
Al Blumrosen............City Editor
Philip Dawson.......Editorial Direotor
Mary Stein...........Associate Editor
Jo Misner..............Associate Editor
George Walker.......Associate Editor
Don McNeil......Associate Editor
Alex Lmanian......Photography Editor
Pres Holmes........Sports Co-Editor
Merle Levin........Sports Co-Editor
Roger Goelz.....Associate Sports Editor
Miriam Cady..........Women's Editor
Lee Kaltenbach..Associate Women's Ed.

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