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January 04, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-01-04

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PA CF SIX

Tilt ilifItAN DIL~Y

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 1950

-______________________________________________.

COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS:
Many Posts Open
In Union,_League

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This, is the
third in a series of articles to ac-
quaint students with some of the
influential organizations on cam-
pus and how members and officials
are chosen.)
By PETER HOTTON
With the passing of the annual
"17 days of bliss" to lighten hard-
working students' burdens, The
Daily resumes its series on "how to
keep -from being a nonentity on a
campus of 20,000 students."
The Union, one of the oldest or-
ganizations on campus, is the
sanctum sanctorum of about 15,-
000 University men where they can
run from the clutches of women,
if they want to, and where they
can work up in the ranks to cam-
pus fame.
*, * *
COUNTERPART of the men's
headquarters -is- the League, of
which some 5,000 women are mem-
bers, about one fourth of the Un-
ion membership.
If a man wants to get away
from a woman or women, all he
has to do is go through the.
front door of his "home on cam-
pus," through which no woman
can walk.
The Union boasts the largest
student membership on campus,
and the largest life membership as
well. Life membership comes auto-
matically to those who pay their
fees for four years as students.
* * *
TOP-RANKING UNION body
is the Board of Directors, com-
posed of nine students and nine
non-students.
Students Include the Union
president, recording secretary,
six vice-presidents and president
of Men's Judiciary.
The president receives his post
by appointment by a selection
committee, which in turn is ap-
pointed by an appointments com-
mittee.
* ,* *
PERHAPS THE STRONGEST
group in the entire setup is the.
appointments committee, which
has the power to appoint all but
eX-officio committee members.
Members of this group are the
president, financial and recording
secretaries, general manager of
Alumni Association and the senior
faculty member of the Board of
Directors.
Direct outlet to the students is
the activities committee, which
plans and controls all matters
of student interest. The presi-
dent and recording secretary are
also on this committee plus a
Junior Executive Council select-
ed by the president and record-
ing secretary from a group of
"tryouts" who have worked on
the Union staff.

Twelve aspirants for the six el-
ective vice-presidential posts gen-
erally are nominated by the nomi-
nating committee, which is cho-
sen by the appointments commit-
tee.
* * *
League .
The League, though it has a
smaller number of - both student
and life members than the Union,
is every bit as complex.
Top governing body of the wo-
men is the League Executive Coun-
cil, which handles all meetings
and affairs. It is made up of the
usual president, vice-president,
secretary and treasurer, plus Judi-
ciary Council chairman and inter-
viewing chairman.,
* *
SECOND IN LINE of importance
in League circles is the Council,
composed of chairmen of 18 stand-
ing committees of the League,
which bear the burden of League
functions.
Other members of the Coun-
cil are ex-officio, automatically
gaining council membership by
virtue of being selected top mem-
member of several women's out-
side organizations.
All these members may vote and
must be seniors. Other members
are also ex-officio or selected from
subordinate League projects, such
as Junior Girl's Play and Soph
Cabaret.
*, * *
MEMBERS OF the League's
vast machinery are seniors, jun-
iors and sophomores who hold
voluntary or appointed committee
positions ranging from one of the
standing committees to govern-
ing committees of Junior Girl's
Play and Soph Cabaret.
League Executive Council po-
sitions carry a lot of prestige,
but getting a post is quite in-
volved.
Hopefuls first petition the Lea-
gue interviewing committee, which
selects a first and second choice
for each office.
Choices and rejections, togeth-
er with reasons for both, are then
submitted to the League Council
which choses one of the two
choices by a three-quarter vote. A
unanimous vote is needed to elect
a person rejected by interviewing.
Final approval is made by the
Electoral Board, made up of the
Executive Council and the Dean
of Women, League Social Director
and chairman of women's physical
education program.

Smith Urges
State Labor
Law Review
The United States Supreme
Court definitely should review Mi-
chigan's strike regulation law as
the government has asked, accord-
ing to Prof. Russell A. Smith of
the Law School.
The government's request came
in the form of a memorandum to
the court asking that it hear the
appeal of the United Automobile
Workers from a Michigan Supreme
Court decision.
The memorandum asserts that
the Michigan law, known as the
Bonine-Tripp Act, conflicts with
provisions of the Taft-Hartley.
The Michigan statute states
that no strike may lawfully occur
until the state mediation board
polls the employees and for 10
days thereafter. This provision, the
government believes, conflicts with
national law.
Prof. Smith, a specialist in labor
law, termed the whole controversy
"a tough question. It certainly is-
n't clear from previous Supreme
Court decisions whether the law
is valid or not," he added.
Prof. Smith declared that be-
cause of the many state labor re-
lations acts, the extent of a state's
power in such affairs ought to be
clearly defined.
Hearing the appeal, the educa-
tor thought, would furnish an op-
portunity to do this.
There is a question about the
Michigan Supreme Court decision,
Prof. Smith said, because of dif-
ferences between the Michigan
case and the Wisconsin dispute
used as precedent by the court.

An ambitious group of students
from several colleges and many
countries pooled their incentive
and muscle-power over the holi-
days so that some displaced Eur-
opean family might have a home
in America.
The students, sponsored by So-
ciety of Friends (Quakers) groups
at Ann Arbor and Lansing, set up
a "work camp" at a farm near
Vandalia, in Southeastern Michi-
gan, where they toiled for eight
days reconditioning a farmhouse.
* * *
THE HOUSE, donated by
Quakers Clarence and Elizabeth
Cunningham, will be turned over
to some as yet undetermined dis-
placed family, according to Car-
lene Bagnall, Grad, who arranged
the project in Ann Arbor.
Miss Bagnall said that the
displaced family will be brought
to Michigan either by the local
Friends group or an Ann Arbor
church.
Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham
have promised to let the family
occupy the house as long as they
desire.
* * *
STUDENTS CAME from the
University, Michigan State Col-
lege and several Indiana schools
to put the home in order.
Moving into the frame
structure on Dec. 16, the 17
member "international, inter-
faith and interracial" group
tackled the job of sprucing it
up. Hailing from Iran, Iraq,
the Netherlands, India, and
Pakistan, as well as the United

SACRIFICE HOLIDAY:
Students Work To Give
Displaced Family Home

States, they painted, plastered,
scrubbed and hammered until
Dec. 23, when they finished the
job.
But it wasn't all work. Taking
time off for fun, ,they square-
danced at night, cooked their
own meals and traded informa-
tion about their national life and
customs.
University students who donat-
ed their services were: Amer H.
Noorbakhsh, Gulmohamud Kap-
adia, '53E, Sherali Valji, '51 Spec.,
Ramesh Malhotra, Grad, Ohunes
Sengun, Grad, C. Campbell Wil-
son, Grad, Hazel Tulecke, Don
Haskell, '51, Bob Fantway, Bar-
bara Moss, '50M, and Miss Bag-
nall.

City Has No
Auto Deaths
During_1949
Ann Arbor whizzed through 19-
49 without a single traffic fatal-
ity, local Chief of Police Casper
Enkemann revealed yesterday.
Driving carelessness during the
past year resulted in 562 local ac-
cidents, as compared with 657 in
1948, he noted. Two traffic fatal-
ities that year marred an other-
wise average Ann Arbor slate, he
added.
Other comparative figures show
396 property damage accidents
here last year to 460 in 1948; 113
personal injuries in 1949 and 140
in '48.
Pedestrian injuries here last
year took only a slight dip from
the 1948 total, 53 and 55.

:

'I

- -

FIRST WOMAN AMBASSADOR-Mrs. Eugenie Anderson (right)
America's first woman ambassador from Red Wing, Minn., and
her husband , and children stand in front of their new Copen-
hagen, Denmark, home.
RAD IOACTIVE IODINE:
New Way To Determine Child
Thyroid Deficiencies Found

t
t

A new method of determining
decreased thyroid gland deficien-
cy in children by the use of ra-
dioactive iodine has been reported
by University scientists.
The new method gives better re-
sults in determining decreased
thyroid activity at an early age
than other laboratory procedures
now available, according to Dr.
George H. Lowrey, instructor in
pediatrics and communicable di-
seases at the Medical School.
EARLY DIAGNOSIS and treat-
ment of decreased thyroid func-
tion is necessary for a child's best
mental and physical development,
Dr. Lowrey added.
The research on the new me-
thod was conducted by Dr. Low-
rey, Dr. William H. Beierwaltes,
assistant professor of internal
medicine at the Medical School,
Dr. Isadore Lampe, professor of
roentgenology at the Medical
School and Henry J. Gomberg,
instructor in electrical engineer-
ing.
The research was sponsored by
the Phoenix Project, the grad-
uate school and the National Re-
search Council.

given by mouth to 26 children, 12
of whom were free of disease and
the other 14 not, the researchers
explained.
Measurements of the iodine
carried to the thyroid gland by
the blood indicated a marked
difference in the amount picked
up by the normal and abnormal
thyroid gland, they said.
The children with thyroid defi-
ciencies tended to absorb less ra-
dioactive iodine, they added.
The degree of radiation to the
body tissues resulting from the
radioactive iodine consumed is less
than that involved in the taking
an X-Ray film, Dr. Lowrey said.

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14

(TOMORROW: Men's and Wo-
men's Judiciaries, Assembly and
Panhel.)

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