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December 15, 1949 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-15

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DECEMBER 15, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

PAGE T m

..
... , =,

rI

fIII

AILY DOUBLE
by pres holmes, sports co-editor

'Buckshot' O'Brien Stars as Butler Fails
Before Accurate Michigan Shooting Spree

VarsityTops Frosh Matmen

HE'SUBJECT of the two-platoon system is presently under very
serious consideration, and some of the attitudes of well-known
figures in the world of sports should be aired.
Tennessee's veteran coach, Bob Neyland, states, "I will support
to the limit any move to abolish the two-platoon system in college
football."
The dean of American football coaches, Amos Alonzo Stagg,
complains, "It's not the same game. This platoon business was
unheard of in early days, if a fellow had a position on the team
he was expected to fill the job the whole game."
Coach Harvey Harman of Rutgers states bluntly that the two-
platoon system must go "before it destroys the game."
ON THE OTHER SIDE of the question Michigan's Bennie Ooster-
baan gives three major reasons for his support of the two-platoon
system. "First, it promotes better football. Fresh men can play a
better game than those used for long periods at a time. Second, more
men can play the game. Third, it tends to lessen the chance of
injury. A tired man is more apt to be injured than a fresh player."
Lynn Waldorf of California tourhes on an interesting angle
when he says, "It helps the spectators to appreciate the impor-
tance of defense and the job the boys on the defensive team are
doing."
Henry Frnka of Tulane, Howie Odell of Washington, Bud Wilkin-
son of Oklahoma, and Georgia Tech's Bobby Dodd are all in favor of
this type of football.
H E SITUATION really boils down to the fact that if a coach
has enough players, the two-platoon system is fine. It's the
smaller schools who are raising the erv."ret rid of the w-nla.nnW

(Continued from Page 1)
Wolverine reserves more than
holding their own for the final
25 point advantage.
Michigan's third win in four
games and second without a loss
on the home floor saddled the
Bulldogs with their third straight
Conference loss, but the Wolver-
ine margin was the biggest yet.

TIE LOSERS, displaying a
clever block offense, tallied 'an
overall 30% of their shots, but
hit only 23%°l in the first half.
The second stanza was an entire-
ly different ball game as the
O'Brien-led Bulldogs were out-
scored only 33-32.
It was Michigan's defense that
stalled the Butler attack in the

first half, but the visitors ral-
lied against the switching sec-
ond half set-up.
The winners worked well around
the pivot, displaying snappy pass-
ing and good ball-handling.
Next outing for the Wolverines
is against North Carolina State
December 19 and 20 at Raleigh,
North Carolina.
Tally One,

Varsity wrestlers continued to
Dominate competition in the sec-
ond and final day of the fresh-
man-varsity mat meet.
Walter Noon won the frosh's
only victory of the day, as he up-
set Dick Hindrian in a 165 pound
match, 9-7.
* * *
JACK GALLON, who won the
freshman's lone victory yesterday,
wrestled for the second time in

two days and lost to Dave Space,
5-3, in a close 135 pound match.
,n another 135 pound en-
counter, Bob Sligh beat fresh-
man Gordon Bronson, despite a
third period rally by Bronson.
Planck pinned Bill Comstock in
the first period of a 175 pound
match while Holcombe took
Gordon Neufang to the canvas in
the second period of a 165 pound
battle.

HOLIDAY GREETINGS
TO YOU!!
Looking well-groomedfor the
tHolidays is an asset. Your co-
operation and confidence in
our workmanship, service, and
personnel is highly commend-
able . . . May happiness andE
joy be with you.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

I --.-.-- - -______________

Tigers Get Priddy; Braves
Give Stanky, Dark to Giants

BUTLER (48)

FG FT PF'TP

NEW YORK, Dec. 14--(P)-The
baseball trade dam burst today
under pressure of a million dollars
worth of deals including a jolting
six-man swap between the New
York Giants and Boston Braves.
Here are the big ones in the last
24 hours:
OUTFIELDER Willard Marshall,
outfielder-third baseman Sid Gor-
don, shortstop Buddy Kerr and
Pitcher Sam Webb of the Giants
to the Braves for shortstop Alvin
Dark and second baseman Eddie
Stanky.
Second baseman Gerry Prid-
dy of the St. Louis Browns to
Detroit for pitcher Lou Kretlow
and cash in excess of $100,000.
Third baseman Hank Majeski of
the Philadelphia A's to the Chi-

cago White Sox for pitcher Ed
Klieman.
THIRD BASEMAN Bob Dillin-
ger and outfielder Paul Lehner of
the St. Louis Browns to the A's for
shortstop Billy Demars, third base-
man Frank Gustline, outfielders
Ray Coleman and Rocco Ippolitto
and $100,000.
Pitcher Bill Voiselle of the
Boston Braves to the Chicago
Cubs for infielder Gene Mauch
and cash.
Outfielder Mary Rickert of the
Boston Braves to Pittsburgh for
cash and an unnamed minor lea-
gue player.
OUTFIELDER Ron Northey and
infielder Lou Klein of the St. Louis
Cardinals to Cincinnati for out-
fielder Harry Walker and an un-
named minor league player.

W. O'Brien F......2
Steinhart F ........0
Burdsall F........0
Chapman C ........1
R. O'Brien G ......8
Doyle G ...........0
Crockett G .........5
Walt O'Brien G ... .1
Wood G ...........1

0
0
0
2
4
3
2
0
0

4
0
2
1
3
3
3
1
3

4
0
0
4
20
3
12
2
2

A Real Christmas Savings!
A PAIR OF PANTS FOR ONLY

Fougerousse G .....0 0 0 0
Totals ............18 12 20 48
* * *

X200

GABARDINES
SHARKSKINS
CORDUROYS

MICHIGAN (73) FG
Suprunowicz F.....8
Skala F ............4
McIntosh F ........6
Olson F ...........1
Wisniewski F ......0
Vander Kuy C . .. .6
Morrill G ..........1
Murray G ..........1
Doyle G ...........1
Tiernan G ..........1
Totals ...........29

FT PFTP

2
4
E 4
0
0
0
0
2
7
0
0
15

2
1
2
0
0
5
2
J)
2
1
18'

18
12
12
2
0
12
4
9
2
2
73

v

, a1ac "iuv W1al agls11cV,,p gu;on V 1C +V1JUU1
jsystem.'
This is where the statement of Blair Cherry, Texas mentor,
takes on significance. "I think the current rules and regula-
tions allowing the use of' the two-platoon system will lead to
a definite separation of major colleges from minor ones. Every
team will compete in its own class."
Jeff Cravath of Southern California sums it up by saying,
w "The two-platoon system is tough on schools who lack the man-
power, but it helps the major teams by giving all their players a
chance to play." He adds significantly, "It helps the smaller schools
by keeping them out of competition with more powerful teams."
* * *1 *
IN OTHER WORDS the smaller schools complain because of
unfair and overpowering competition. The coaches' solution to the
situation is segregation of the smaller schools from the larger ones.
Will that, then, be the result of this latest trend of football?
It seems logical and fair enough, but, of course, it is impossible
to determine.
One thing is certain, however. The two-platoon system is not
going to destroy the game, as some mer, seem to feel. This sport
has undergone more drastic changes than the introduction of the
two-platoon system - the forward pass and the shift, to name two
- and all of them have helped to make the game more interesting,
not kill it.
The annual meeting of the National Football Coschs Associa-
tion is being held in New York January 12-14. This subject is certain
to come up, and possibly some rule changes will be made regarding
the two-platoon system, but none of them will go so far as to outlaw
this style of play. It's here to stay and should lead to a better and
more fascinating brand of football.
LIQUIDATION SALE ENDS DEC. 18thM
Fine ORIENTAL RUGS Large Asst.
Gift Rugs $14 up
You Save 30% to 40%9
This Christmas give your home and dear ones the rich and lasting
beauty of an Oriental Rug3
N. L. Mangouni 334 S. 4th Ave. ,-Phone 6878

I

Buy One Pair for as Low as $6.95
And for Only $2.00 More
You Get Another Pair of Equal Value!
2 Pair for Only $8.95

Score at half: Michigan 40, But-
ler 16.

I"

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
est Milton Halliday, English; the-
sis: "Narrative Technique in the
Novels of Ernest Hemingway," 7
p.m., Thurs.,rDec. 15, East Coun-
cil Room, Rackham Bldg., Chair-
man A. L. Bader.
Doctoral Examination for Rich-
ard Keith Arnold, Forestry and
Conservation; thesis: "Economic
and Social Determinants of an
Adequate Level of Forest Fire Con-
trol," 1:30 p.m., Fri., Dec. 16, 2045
Natural Science Bldg. Chairman,
.S W. Allen.
Doctoral Examination for Wil-
fred Minnich Senseman. English;
thesis; "Demi-Science and Fiction;
The Utilization of the Pseudo-
Scientific in Some English Novels
of the Period from 1790 to 1840,"
9 a.m., Sat., Dec. 17, East Coun-
cil Room, Rackham Bldg. Chair-
man, J. L. Davis.
Zoology Seminar: 4:15 p.m.,
Thurs., Dec. 15, Rackham Amphi-
theater. Mr. Martin J. Ulmer will

speak .on "The Life History of
Postharmostomum helicis (Leidy),
(Trematoda)."
Medical College Admission Test:
Students who have not as yet ob-
tained their application blank for
the Medical College Admission test
to be administered Jan. 16, 1950,
can obtain them by calling at 110
Rackham Bldg. These applications
are due in Princeton, N.J., not later
than Jan. 2.
Concerts
Student Recital: Graham Young,
a Wind Instrument major in the
School of Music, will present a
program in partial fulfillment of
the requirements for the Bachelor
of Music degree at 8:30 p.m.,
Thurs., Dec. 15, Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theater. He will be assisted
by members of the Woodwind En-
semble Class taught by Dwight
Dailey. A pupil of Clifford Lillya,
Mr. Young will play works by
Barat, Hindemith, Bohme, Feld-
man, Tomasi, and Daniel Gregory
Mason. The public is invited.
Events Today
Lutheran Student Association:
Caroling Party, 7:30 p.m., at the
Center, 1304 Hill Street. Refresh-
ments at the Center after the carol
sing.
Wesleyan Guild Christmas car-
oling, 7:30-10 p.m., followed by
refreshments in the Guild Lounge,
Methodist Church.
International Center Weekly Tea:
4:30-6 p.m., for all foreign students
and American friends.
Inter-Arts Union: Meeting at 7
p.m., 5th floor, Burton Memorial
Tower.
La P'tite Causette: 3:30 p.m.,
Grill Room, League.
Polonia Club: Meeting and Christ-
mas Party, 7:30 p.m., International

Center. Admission to party:
small gift.

ANN ARBOR

a

Coming Events
Exhibition halls of the Univer-
sity Museums: Open to st'udents
and the public, 7 to 9 p.m., Fri.,
Dec. 16. Natural history motion
pictures: "Animal Life" and "Story
of the Bees," 7:30 p.m. in Rm.
3024.

CUT - ATE
113 South Main St. CLOTHING

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Phone 2-5187

IF

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Relax, men and take your Christmas
~-
shopping easy.
SThursday,December 15th
from 7 to 9 P.M.
This is the night to check off the
women on your list at their
favorite store.
jaco oonl'
NO WOMEN PERMITTED
Santa suggests these GIFTS for HIM
TO MAKE THIS CHRISTMAS THE MERRIEST OF THEM ALL!
PAJAMAS by Sandy McDonald.......... $3.50up
PIONEER BILLFOLDS................. $3.50 up
- ROPER SWEATERS........... .....$3.95up
COOPER JOCKEY SHORTS............. $1.00up
CUFF LINKS....$.5................ 5Oup
TIE PINS.........................$1.50up
LINEN HANKIES.................. 65c up
ROBES ............................$10.95 up
CORDUROY SHIRTS............ . .$6.50 up +
~ COOPERS ARGYLES ...................$1.50 up

It's Christmas Time
with jfo
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HANDKERCH I EFS
BELTS-SUSPENDERS
LEATHER JACKETS
RAINCOATS
WOOL JACKETS
GOLF JACKETS
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