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December 14, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHUT

TIIE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

GIANT-MAKING:
Activities Offer
Campus Fame'

Friends' Plans Workshop

AP

Pi

T UE

NEWS

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first
In a series of articles to acquaint
students with some of the influen-
tial organizations on campus and
how memberssand officers are
chosen.)
By PETER HOTTON
The large number of students
on campus pose a real problem
to those who want to make a
name for themselves while at the
University.
But anyone can gain fame, only
there's one hitch-it takes work-
and a lot of it.
* * *
A PERSON can become a cam-
pus giant if he applies himself,
and gives up all thoughts of doing
homework for the last two years
of his college career. He can start
on the long rough road in the sec-
ond semester of his freshman
year, when he becomes eligible
and if he can keep a two-point
average.
He can get into almost any
organization from The Daily to
the Union staff; most have a
"tryout" period during whiah
he learns the ropes of his Job.
The term "tryout" here is mis-
leading-it signifies an actual
working member rather than
one who goes through a trial
period to qualify for his job.
After getting a start, the aspir-
ant climbs, sometimes quite rapid-
ly, up the ladder through his
sophomore and Junior years, until
he has emerged as president,
chairman or biggest "wheel" of
his particular organization, if he
can stay in school.
Student Affairs.
Perhaps the most influential
and powerful student groups on
campus, the Student Affairs Com-
mittee has the final say on stu-
dent matters not falling under
jurisdiction of the Boards in
Control of Student Publications
or Intercollegiate Athletics.
The Committee, revised in June
of 1946, is made up of 13 mem-
bers, seven of whom are students.
The students become members
automatically through working
up to their high offices, consid-
ered by faculty members of the
Committee to be the loftiest .stu-
dent positions on campus.
POSITIONS high enough to
warrant Committee membership
are managing editor of The Daily,
president of Student Legislature,
presidents of the Union and
League, presidents of Men's and
Women's Judiciaries and a wom-
at Student Legislator chosen by
the SL cabinet and approved by
the Legislature.
* * *
Student Legislature .. .
'TM+"o of the mmber a m from
otudeot Legislature, which pro-
Vues any persistent stuent wic
the charCce to Jump from a nobody
to a campus politico via elections,
held each fall and spring.
After struggling with a 150-
name'petition to get on the ballot,
the budding aspirant must then
contend with 50 or 60 other can-
didates in a two-week open-house
session, during which they drop
'Virtually all homework.
* .* *
ELECTION NIGHT is the hope-
ful's happy climax or ignoble
downfall, depending on his elec-

tion or defeat. But either way,
as one female candidate said of
the last election night: "It's hell,
believe me."
Once the hard-working stu-
dent gets on the Legislature, he
just begins his work, attending
three-hour meetings every two
weeks and serving on one of
SL's six standing committees
or extra subcommittees.
One can be a nonentity on the
Legislature, too. But one of the
ways to prevent this is to work for
the "Valhalla" of a committee
chairmanship.
* * *
THE CABINET makes the
choices, according to the aspirant's
ability and how much time he can
spare. The Legislature has the fi-
nal say on who the cabinet choos-
es-
The cabinet, consisting of presi-
dent, vice-president, two secretar-
ies, treasurer and two members-at-
large, has a little tougher time in
its claim for fame. It must be
elected by the Legislature at its
election meeting, which will be the
first Wednesday in January.
* * *
Michigan Daily.. ..
One of the easiest organizations
to get onto but among the hardest
to work up on is the Daily, a mold-
er as well as receiver of campus
opinion.
After a year and a half of re-
porting and taking orders, the
aspirant gets a chance to plug for
junior staff positions-seven night
editorships and seven assistant
night editorships. .
* *
THE NIGHT EDITOR has full
charge of the entire paper one
night a week, and the assistant
night editor performs what his
title indicates. Both serve as re-
porters, as well.
Appointments come just be-
fore the end of the spring and
fall semesters. At these times,
the aspirant turns in his scrap-
book of clippings to the senior
editor-and, prays. That's all
he has to do; the seniors do the
appointing, subject to the ap-
proval by the Board in Control
of Student Publications.
Senior editors (managing editor,
city editor, editorial director and
associate editors) who control the
entire staff, face a more compli-
cated problem at appointment
time.
* * *
THEY MUST petition the Board
in Control. After filling out posi-
tions in 12 copies, one for each
member of the Board and one for
the files, they must go up before
the Board for five-minute inter-
views.
In the interview the applicant
must give his reasons for wishing
to become a senior editor and tell
what he'd do to improve the paper
if he got the job.
TOMORROW: IFC, AIM and
Quad Councils.
Increased Efficiency
Helicopter blades are being
developed of fiberglass to increase
efficiency with smooth surface
and rigidity.

Work and play will be combined
n the Christmas Workcamp at the
Dlarence Cunningham farm, near
Vandalia, Michigan.
Sponsored by the Ann Arbor and
Lansing Young Friends Fellowship,
.he workeamp will meet from Sat-
urday through Dec. 23.
The workcamp's project, re-
pairing a farmhouse donated to
a family of displaced persons,
will be supplemented by evening
discussions, ice-skating and folk
dancing.
According to the Young Friends

Fellowship, they are hoping for an
international, inter-racial and in-
ter-faith group of about 15.
Old work clothes, ice skates,
song books, musical instruments
and books of poetry and devo-
tions are the suggested items to
be brought along.
Those interested in participating
in this project may register with
Miss Carnie Bagnall, Grad, befor(
Dec. 16, by calling 3-1102. The cost
for the entire period will be $5.00,
or $1.00 per day.

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 23-FEBRUARY 3, 1950
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and recitations,
the time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having recitations only, the time of the class
is the time of the first recitation period. Certain courses will
be examined at special periods as noted below the regular
schedule. 12 o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes
and other "irregular" classes may use any examination period
provided there is no conflict (or one with conflicts if the con-
flicts are arranged for by the "irregular" class). A final ex-
amination on February 3 is available for "irregular" classes
which are unable to utilize an earlier period.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination. In the College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date 'of examination
may be changed without the consent of the Committee on Ex-
aminations.

i

PRIZE WIN NE R--
Lord Boyd Orr, winner of the
1949 Nobel Peace prize, addresses
a meeting in London during
celebration of America-British
Commonwealth Week.

S T U D E N T P R 0 J E C T+Students in the building trades class of Raytown, Mo., High School,
work on the six-room house with garage they are building as part of their class work.

I
9

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8. .. .. .
9. . ... .
10.....
11.......

...........M on.,

....................M on.,
....................W ed.,
....................F ri.,

Jan. 30, 9-12
Jan. 23, 9-12
Jan. 25, 9-12
Jan. 27, 9-12

1 ........................
2 ........................
3 ........................
8 ........................
9 ........................
10 ........................
11 ........................
1 ....................
2 ....................
3 ........................

.. Sat., Jan.
....Wed., Feb.
... Thurs., Feb.
.. Tues., Jan.
... Tues., Jan.
.. Thurs., Jan.
... Sat., Jan.
... Wed., Feb.
... Thurs., Feb.
... Fri., Jan.

28,
1,
2,
31,
24,
26,
28,
1,
2,
27

2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5

Conflicts and Irregular ......

............Fri.,

Feb. 3, 9-12

These regular examination periods have precedence over any
special period scheduled concurrently. Conflict must be ar-
ranged for by the instructor of the "special" class.
SPECIAL PERIODS

FUR FARM E R_-Vantile
Platt sorts and grades chinchilla
pelts after 'tanning, at a fur-
breeding farm in Gardena, Cal.,
where mink and chinchilla are
raised for the market.

O N E D 0 W N, T W 0 T O C 0 - Arbitration throws his jockey in a hurdle race at San-
down Park, England. Jockey Reeves, on African Project (7), and another competitor went down later.

English 1, 2.............
Psychology 31 ..............
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31,
32, 61, 62, 91, 92, 93, 153 ..
Speech 31, 32 ..............
German 1, 2, 31..........
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ........
Botany 1; Zoology 1 ........
Chemistry 1, 3, 21, 55 ........
Sociology 51, 54, 90 ..........
Political Science 1........
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101
Russian 1...............

.............M on.,
.............M on.,
.............Tues.,
..............Tues.,
...Wed.,
......... ..W ed.,
..............Thurs.,
.. . .. ..Fri.,
.. .........M on.,
.............Mon.,
... Tues.,

Jan. 23, 2- 5
Jan. 23, 2- 5

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

24,
24,
25,
25,
26,
27,
30,
30.
31,

2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-

5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5

.Thurs., Feb.

2, 2- 5

Micro-groove or Standard
RECORDS of the
Operetta Performance
Any part or the whole -performance as you wish -
an excellent Christmas Gift.
By the U. of M. Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Under Direction of William Boyer

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of ex-
aminations, see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
JANUARY 23 to FEBRUARY 3, 1950
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time
of the first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209, East Engineering
Building between January 9 and January 14 for instruction.
To avoid misunderstanding and errors each student should re-
ceive notification from his instructor of the time and place of
his appearance in each course during the period January 23
to February 3.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

')GUSSIE CHANGES
Gertrude (Gorgeous Gussie)
loran displays the new plung-
ing neckline in her dress for the
Wimbledon Ball, London, fol-
lowing British tennis matches.

T 0 U C H D 0 W N P A S S - Chicago Cardinals end Mal Kutner leaps into the air to snatch
a pass from back Jim Hardy under the goalpost in the game against Green Bay Packers in Chicago.

12" Standard
$2.75 Each

Micro-groove
$5.00 Each

HI-FI RECORDING STUDIO
215 Birk Ph. 2-3053
WANTED DESPERATELY!
September, 1949, Issues
nf *ka A.AD1nfVIiF

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8.............
9.............
10.............
11.............
1.............
2.............
3.............

..............Mon., Jan.
..............M on., Jan.
..............Wed., Jan.
..............Fri., Jan.
...............Sat., Jan.
..............W ed.. Feb.
..Thurs., Feb.

8...........................Tues.,
9...........................Tues.,
10........... ... ...Thurs.,.
11...........................Sat.,
1...........................Wed.,
2...........................Thurs.,1
3 ...........................F ri.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.

30,
23,
25,
27,
28,
1,
2,
31,
24,
26,
28,
1,
2,
27

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12'
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5

1*rnv R-F'vn 11 V1 1) 1 -I 1\R r 'I1 4a fl *'A ...

I

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