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September 28, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-09-28

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pirates 6-4

Win

Cuts

C

'I S Ji/1if'g
Saffell's Grand Slam omer
Provides Necessary Edge

THE OFFICIAL attendance figures for the Michigan-State game
last Saturday listed the crowd at 97,239; but there was a person
there who wasn't included in that all-time mark-he couldn't be
seen, but he was there, his presence was felt; he's the man who
made that spectacle and the other prodigious athletic facilities at
Michigan a reality: the late Fielding H. Yost.
Let's go back to 1901 when "Hurry Up" Yost first came to Ann
Arbor to coach a faltering football team, back to the start of the
career of a man who was to become a legend at Michigan.
Yost coached Michigan's football teams from 1901-1926, and
was Athletic Director from 1921-1941. Always foremost in Yost's
mind was "Athletics for All." He realized that such a project would
take a great deal of money, but maintained that football alone would
pay for such a plan.
YOST FORESAW that in years to come the thousands of Mich-
igan students would be taking part in athletics-not to make the
varsity, necessarily, but just to enjoy themselves and build up their
bodies at the same time the professors were building up their brains.
He told Charles Baird, then manager of Athletics at Mich-
igan, "We'll not have two tennis courts, but fifty or a hundred;
not one basketball court, but fifteen, maybe twenty; we'll have
four or five football fields and fencing rooms and handball courts
and swimming pools and rifle ranges-Mr. Baird, this University is
going to have the finest athletic plant of any college in the
country! And it's not going to cost the taxpayers of this state
one cent!"
Yost's plan was to produce football teams that thousands upon
thousands of people would come to see. Back at the beginning of the
century his teams played in old Regent's Field before a possible
capacity crowd of 800.
BY 1905, after Yost's teams had gone 56 games without a defeat,
the capacity was upped to 4,000 people, but he told Baird that the
stands would have to be enlarged again in a few years to hold at least
ten thousand fans-but still that wouldn't be enough.
"Someday," Yost said, "we're going to build a real stadium
here at Michigan. It's going to seat fifty-maybe seventy-five
thousand people." Baird was all set to put in a call to the insane
asylum. "Wait and see," was all the envisioning Yost said.
They only had to wait until the fall of 1927 when Michigan
played its first game in the "Bowl that Yost built." Yost and Baird
stood at the top of the stadium looking at the jam-packed crowd.
Finally Yost turned to his old friend and with a knowing smile said,
"Eighty-five thousand people, Charlie, and they all came to see a
football game."
* * * *
AND BECAUSE they came to the game and have continued com-
ing, because Yost had a dream and struck to it, because of Yost's
faith and foresight, Michigan has one of the finest athletic plants
of any college in the country.
The Stadium is the largest college-owned stadium in the
country; Yost Field House, the Intra-Mural Building, the Hockey
Rink, Ferry Field, Waterman and Barbour Gyms, the Women's
Athletic Building and adjoining grounds, and the University Golf
Course give Michigan students almost unlimited athletic and
recreational opportunities.
Fielding Yost is dead. He died three years ago. The great Michigan
teams and students of today know him only as a memory. But Fielding
Yost is not and can not ever be forgotten. Wherever football is played,
as long as athletics remain a part of our lives, he will be remembered.
I,'

M Bottles Up
Indian Plays
In Grid Drills
Kerpthorn Holds
Offense Position
Michigan's blue-shirted defen-
sive line bottled up Stanford's po-
tent T-formation yesterday play-
ing against a red-shirted Jayvee
eleven on Ferry Field's practice
gridiron.
The Junior Varsity, using chief
scout Ernie McCoy's Stanford of-
fense, battered futilely at the unit
that halted the Michigan State at-
tack last Saturday.

STAN MUSIAL
... ace of Cards

PITTSBURGH-(/P)-A mighty
Home Run blast with the bases
loaded by Tom Saffell, a little
known outfielder who only two
months ago toiled in the bushes,
almost broke the hearts of the
pennant-starved St. Louis Cardi-
nals last night.
The paralyzing blow came in the
second inning with George (Red)
Munger on the mound and paved
the way for the Redbirds' crushing
6-4 defeat at the hands of the
sixth 'place Pittsburgh Pirates.
THE COSTLY setback, St.
Louis' sixth in 10 starts here,
sliced a half game off the Cards'
first place lead over the idle
Brooklyn Dodgers who now trail
by only one game. Thus the Brooks
now can tie for first place pro'vid-
ed they win all their remaining
four games while the Cards drop
one of their four.
Willie Werle, a 27-year-old
southpaw from San Francisco,
who only 11 days ago handed
the Dodgers a disastrous defeat,
repeated the trick against the
Cards. However, a fine relief
chore by Vic Lombardi, a
Dodger castoff, helped Werle
register his 12th triumph and
his first of the season over the
Redbirds.
Wally Westlake led off the Pitts-!

burgh second with a single and
should have been erased on Pete
Castiglione's bouncer to Tommy
Glaviano, but. Red Schoendienst
dropped the third sacker's throw
in a double play attempt, and all
hands were safe. Westlake was
cut down at the plate on Monty
Basgall's grounder, but Munger
All fraternity athletic man-
agers are urgently requested to
attend an important organiza-
tional meeting tonight in the
main office of the I-M Build-
inEg.
--Earl Riskey.

walked Clyde McCullough
Stan Rojek to force in a run.

and

THE HIGHLY-TOUTED Stan-
ford Indians have scored a total
of 93 points in their first two
outings without having been
scored upon as yet. Small San
Jose State was the first victim
while Art Valpey's Harvard club
fell last weekend.
Signal drills, both offensive
and by the pseudo-Stanford ma-
chine, were also conducted as
the session culminated with Var-
sity offensive scrimmage.
Physical condition of the squad
is reported at tip-top as the team
prepares for tomorrow's flight to
the coast. Leg-cramp injuries to
wingback Leo Koceski and full-
back Don Dufek have responded
to treatment although Koceski's
leg is still bandaged.
* * *
MICHIGAN does not lack a
completely sound fullback, how-
ever, as Coach Benny Oosterbaan
reaffirmed his faith in Dick
Kempthorn as an offensive line-
buster by keeping him in that slot
during today's practice session de-
spite the Canton, Ohio boy's near
fatal fumble in the first play of
Saturday's encounter.
The Michigan Coach said, "I
think Dick turned in a fine per-
formance, that fumble could
happen to anybody. I did it my-
self when I was playing ball."
Oosterbaan utilized the speed
of frosh back Dave Hill, sensa-
tional three sport athlete from
Ypsilanti Central, on the J-V unit
in an attempt to simulate the
speed of the Indian scooter Harry
Hugasian.
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S'K'ClubWins
BATTLE CREEK - (P) - The
Kalamazoo, Mich., Sutherland Pa-
pers team captured the Amateur
Baseball Congress National title
yesterday with a 17-5 win over
the Hannibal, Mo., Pilots.
DO YOU KNOW . . . that
when the Wolverines won the
basketball crown in 1948 it was
the first time since 1927 that
they had taken the title out-
right.

SAFFELL THEN slammed a 2-1
N pitch into the left field stands to
clean the bases.
The Cards fought back vali-
antly, closing the gap to 6-4
with a tree- run uprising
against Werle in the eighth.
RED BIRD Manager Eddie Dyer
practically cleared his bench of
pitchers in a futile effort to sal-
va e the game. After Munger was
blasted in the second, Wilks, Pol-
let, Martin and Brazle all took
their turns on the mound, but the
damage had been done.

$4th 0 Ann/N/
the BIG Annual'

PHILIP MRIS

n,

FOOTBALL
What Scores Do You Pred ict ?
....... ... - -
MICHIGAN v. ARMY
MINNESOTA v. NORTHWESTERN
MICHIGAN STAT E Y. MARYLAND
CORRECT SCORES CORRECT SCORES CORRECT SCORE
WIN 1,000 WIN 200 WINS 100
PHILIP MORRIS CIGARETTES PHILIP MORRIS CIGARETTES PHILIP MORRIS CIGARETTES

'Grandelius Set
For Halfback
Spot at MSC
EAST LANSING -(P) -Sonny
Grandelius, Muskegon Heights
senior, now looks to be the top
candidate for left half position on
the Michigan State football squad.
Grandelius didn't get a chance
to carry the ball in the Michigan
game. When Coach Biggie Munn
wanted to put him in, the makeup
of the rest of the backfield was
such that he needed a punter at
the position.
"SONNY understands the way
things worked out," Munn said.
"But he'll get his chance at the
position."
Grandelius was getting a good
share of the work at the position
in the first practices this week.
Since track stars Horace Smith of
Jackson and Jessie Thomas of
Flint failed to make much head-
way against the Wolverines, the
Western Michigan boy would seem
the logical candidate,
Dedicate Hack
Wilson Grave
MA.RTINSBURG, W. Va.-(,)-
Some of baseball's famed old tim-
ers stood by silently yesterday as
Joe McCarthy unveiled a simple
monument at the grave of Hack
Wilson, the old rowdy boy with
the big bat.
They gathered in a corner of
Rosedale Cemetery in front of a
tapered granite block about 30
Inches square at the base and ten
feet high.
* * *
ON IT WERE crossed bats and
a baseball, and a simple inscrip-
tion: "One of baseball's immortals,
Lewis R. (Hack) Wilson, rests
here."
McCarthy took time out for
tnp n.nmnn ,. .Qni a th *.n-

THE MICHIGAN "CREW-CUT"
is a popular, collegiate hair style
featured with us. Try one!!
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

Two thintgs T1ry
e ollege mam shouldknow!
Ree
*e'..
This is a physics major. Always
up 'n atom. Learned about falling bodiesfrom
Ellery Queen-doesn't give a fig for Newton.
Rides his cyclotron on fission trips.
3{^-' .-'.
t. A-
"; Y
ti"
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investment in solid comfort. Soft roll, button-
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Size-Fixt (average fabric residual shrinkage
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