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December 13, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1949

U

Perfumes Created To Suit Mood;

Speciaities.
In the kingdom of perfumery,
many of the modern masterpieces
owe their beauty, freshness and
lastingness to the use of speciali-
ties which give the scent the aid
it needs in creating its intended
impression.
In fact, the names of some of
these specialities are as famous
among perfumers as are the
names of many perfumes among
the public.
*Specialities owe their origin to
the desire of manufacturers to
make available new blends with
character and vitality. To these
perfumers, specialities have pro-
vided the tools and substances
with which they can create works
of art.
CENTURIES AGO the raw ma-
terials used in perfumery were
few and far between, but improv-
ed'distillation technique later gave
a better and wider variety of na-
tural perfume materials. Types
were still limited to a very small
number, however, and many floral
scents could not be made at all.
Many new aromatics became
available with the development
of chemistry, but instead of the
perfumer's work becoming easier,
it became even more complex.
It has been accomplished, how-
ever, by the leading perfume man-
ufacturers who have large staffs
of chemists, technicians and re-
search workers constantly busy
translating into tangible terms the
aromatic value of chemicals.
IN THIS WAY, new blends are

Give

Beauty, Warmth',

MARCH ON . .
Army Careers Offer Women
Security, Opportunity To Travel

created which constitute an indis-
pensable class of perfume Ingredi-
ents - the specialities.
Specialities are the aids which
provide the opening for the ex-
pression of ideas through scents.
The creator of a perfume for the
public really begins work where
the creator of a speciality house
leaves off. Each artist facili-
tates the task of therother.
The specialities add freshness,
warmth and floweriness to. the
aromatic chemicals, thereby :giv-
ing the inspiration to the perfume.
They provide the scent with its
seal of originality and personality
which give it the sought after pub-
lic appeal.
OFTENTIMES, the complaint is
heard that a perfume has the
proper fragrance but is completely
lacking in fixation. Specialities
once again offer the solution, for
they contain the great fixing pow-
er needed.
For this reason, a speciality
with its own characteristic can
fix either the whole type of a
certain perfume or only the part
which is in need of reinforce-
ment.
Natural oils could be spoken of
as nature's own specialities. Con-
cerning the floral scents, for ex-
ample, processes of extraction are
restricted to omy a few of the
species. They produce the proper
scents, but that . characteristic

fragrance of the living Mlower is
missing.
* * *
CHEMISTS AND perfumers,
working together, have been able
to create specialities which bring
strength, lastingness and addition-
.al floral notes to replace or sup-
plement the naturals.
Clevelanders
Plan Dance
University students frome Cleve-
land will hold their first "Annual
Christmas Dance" from 9 p.m. to
1 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 20 at the
Wade Park Manor in Cleveland.
Sponsored jointly by the Cleve-
land Alumni Association and the
Cleveland Club of University of
Michigan Studeints, the dance will
feature the music of Bob Pattie
and his orchestra.
Tickets may be purchased from
3 to 4:30 p.m. today and tomorrow
in the Administration building.
Members of the executive com-
mittee also selling tickets are:
Marvin Lubeck, 34187; George
Hawthorne, 20549; Jim Arm-
strong, 25571; Marilyn Stone,
25618; George Qua, 23256 and
Pat Doyle, 31561.
For further information mem-
bers of the executive committee
of the club may be contacted.

Women have entered man's once
sacred realm of politics, become
prominent in the field of educa-
ticn and even displayed a muscu-
lar torso in the wrestling ring.
In recent years they have invad-
ed the ranks of the United States
Army.
* * * *
A DEFINITE career field, the
Regular Army offers women se-
curity, variety and an opportunity
for travel according to Major
Eleanore C. Sullivan of the Gen-
eral Staff who visited the campus
yesterday.
Requirements are high, how-
ever, and women seeking admis-
sion to the training program
must be willing to accept re-
sponsibility, Major Sullivan said.
"We are especially interested in
versatile women who have been
campus leaders and have a gener-
al rather than a specialized back-
ground."
MAJOR SULLIVAN pointed out
that applicants must be college
graduates who fall into the 21-27
age group.
Upon acceptance, all appli-
cants will be commissioned 2nd
lieutenants and will receive a
pay rate of $213 plus $42 sub-
sistence allowance.
After six or seven months train-
ing at Camp Lee, Vir., officers will
serve one year in a WAC Company.

They will then be detailed to
different branches of the service.
Preferences may be stated.
"Since the end of the war, peo-
ple have apparently forgotten that
the women's services are a per-
manent part of military establish-
ments," Major Sullivan said.
High ranking military men have
said that commanders should have
available in peace time all compo-
nents needed in national emergen-
cies, Major Sullivan added.
JGP To Hold
First Tryouts
Preliminary tryouts for speak-
ing, singing and dancing parts in
Junior Girls' Play will take place
from 3 fo 6 p.m. Jan. 4, 5, 6 and,
9, Jane Topper, general chairman
of JGP, has announced.
Coeds may sign up in the Un-
dergraduate Office of the League
any. day this week. Women who
will be juniors next semester or
who are not eligible to participate
in activities now, but expect to be
eligible next semester may try out.
The play, which has become a
tradition at Michigan, is produced
by the junior women.

Weddings &
Engagements
Leckl ider-Neef
At a recent dinner at the Alpha
Phi House, the engagement of
Carol anee Lecklider to Allan Ar-
thur Neef was announced.
Miss Lecklider is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Allington Faye
Lecklider of Grosse Pointe. She is
a senior in the literary college.
Mr. Neef is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur Frederick Neef also
of Grosse Pointe. He is in the
School of Law and is a member of
Alpha Kappa Psi.
* * *
Barnett-McCa rga r
Dr. and Mrs. George A. Barnett
of Riverside, Illinois, have announ-
ced the engagement of their
daughter Catherine to George L.
McCargar, Jr., son of Mr. andn
Mrs. George L. McCargar of Grand
Rapids and Chicago.
Miss Barnett is a senior in the
School of Nursing and president
of her nursing class.
Mr. McCargar attends the law
school
Licht-Wolk
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Licht of
Detroit have announced the en-
gagement of their daughter Phyl-
lis to Erwin Wolk, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Morris Wolk, also of Detroit.
Mr. Wolk is a senior in design
and advertising

Applications for Alumnae Coun-
cil scholarships must be turned in
at the Office of the Dean of Wo-
men by 5 p.m. Friday.
Application blanks may be ob-
tained at the Dean's Office. The
applications should contain a
statement of the student's finan-
cial plans, academic standing and
contributions to campus life.
Each applicant must subait
three letters of recommenda-tion
with her application.
Thirteen awards of $200 each
will be made. Stockwell Hall will
receive three. Couzens Hall, Mar-
tha Cook Building, Sarah Caswell
Angell House, Mary Louise Hins-
dale House, Caroline Hubbard
Kleinstuck House and Henderson
House will receive one each.
Mosher and Jordan Halls will
each receive two awards. Under-
graduate women students now

living in the residence halls
named, for who wish to live in
one of them if awarded a schol-
arship, are eligible.
Plans are being made to have
the awards presented in the var-
ious dormitories by members of
the Alumnae Council near the be-
ginning of the spring semester,
according to Mary C. Bromage,
Associate Dean of Women.

Applications for Scholarships
Due at Dean's Office Friday

JENKS & CO.
221 EAST LIBERTY
Phone 2-6220
l--
RONSON LIGHTERS
Table and Pocket Models

The sapphire is the chief gem
of value to be found in the United
States. The greatest number of
emeralds are found in South Amer-
ica.

I

M

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

i

IL

TYPEWRITERS

I

FOUNTAIN PENS
STATIONERY
CHRISTMAS CARDS
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State Ph. 7177
'The Typewriter and
Stationery Store"

(Continued from Page 4)
Pappas, followed by a period of
group practise, conducted by Ma-
jor Erle Stewart.
Sigma Rho Tau: Meeting, 7 p.m.
in E. Engineering Bldg. Inter-cir-
cle debate on "Large Cities Are
Outmoded."
Student Legislature: Human Re-

I

i 1

-AP- !

.°; ROACH PRINTING,

DANCE
PROGRAMS
Tickets, Posters
Christmas Cards
24 Hr. Service

4

II

lations Committee Meeting, 7 p.m.,
Rm. 3B, Union.
The Mathematics Club: 8 p.m.
in the W. Conference Rm., Rack-
ham Bldg.
Dr. Donald A. Darling will speak
on "The Central Limit Theorem."
Michigan Marching Band-Post
season smoker, 7:30 p.m., Harris
Hall. All marching band members
are urged to attend.
Kindai Nihon Kenyu Kai: 8
p.m., E. Lecture Rm., Rackham
Bldg. Prof. James M. Plumer will
give an illustrated lecture based on
new observations and materials
which he recently ,cquired in
Japan. People not receiving noti-
fication of this meeting should
have their home addresses brought
up to date at this meeting.
Co-Recreational Badmin ton
Night: Tuesday Nights in Water-
man Gym, 7 to 9 p.m. All men and
women invited.
ADA: Membership Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Union. Discussion of pro-
gram for next semester.
Le Cercle Francais: The picture
is exhibited in the Romance Lan-
guage Building. Place your orders
before vacation with the Secretary
of the Romance Language Depart-
ment, Room 112.
Coming Events
Canterbury Club: Wed., Dec. 14,
7:15 a.m., Holy Communion fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast.
Undergraduate Psychology Club:
Field trip to Eloise Hospital
(Wayne County), Jan. 6, 1950.
Busses will leave Hill Auditorium
at 12 noon. Non-members will be

charged a nominal fare. Sign up
before Noon, Dec. 16 on the bulle-
tin board outside 3126 Natural
Science..
Undergraduate Psychology Club:
Meeting of the Discussion Group
in Clinical Psychology, 8 p.m. Wed.
Dec. 14, 3121 Natural Science. Prof.
D. G. Marquis will address the]
group on The Aspects of General
Psychology and Research Methods
in the Training Program for Clini-
cal Psychologists.
Sigma Xi: 8 p.m., Wed., Dec. 14,
Rackham Amphitheater. Speaker:
William H. Hobbs, Professor Emer-
itus of Geology. Subject: New
Light on Early Discoveries of
America" (Illustrated). Refresh-
ments.
American Pharmaceutical Asso-
ciation: Meeting, Wed., Dec. 14,
7:30 p.m., Union Ballroom. 'Ensian;
Picture will be taken. All members
are urged to attend.
Glee Club's Christmas program
on Wednesday night, Dec. 14, will
start at 8:30 instead of 8 p.m. as
originally advertised. This is nec-
essary because the program is go-
ing to be broadcast.
Delta Sigma Pi: Meeting at
chapter house, Wed., Dec. 14, 7:30
p.m.
Hiawatha Club: Meeting, Wed.,
Dec. 14, 8:30 p.m., Grand Rapids
Room, League. Short business
meeting followed by University ap-
proved caroling party. All U.P.
students invited.
U. of M. Rifle Club, shoulder to
OPTICAL SERVICE
for the Campus Area
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade Ph. 2-9116

shoulder match with Ann Arbor
Rifle Club, Wed., Dec. 14, 7:30
p.m., ROTC range.
German Club annual Christmas
party: Wed., Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m.,
Rm. A, Union. Refreshments. Late
permission for girls. Bring flash-
lights.
ULLR Ski Club: Movies, busi-
ness meeting, and discussion of a
trip for the days between Christ-
mas and New Year's, 2003 Angell
Hall, 7:30 p.m., Wed., Dec. 14.
Sigma Gamma Epsilon: Meet-
ing, Wed., Dec. 14, 12 noon p.m.
On Jan. 14, 1950, the eminent Ca-
nadian geologist, Mr. Murray
Frarey, will speak.
Political Science Round-Table:
Meet, Wed., Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m., As-
sembly Room, Rackham.
Chess Club: Regular meeting
Wed., Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3D,
Union.

SAVE
and earn
2%
current rate on insured
savings

SEWING SET, geld
plated handles., Red
or'Green Lambskin.
$11.00

I

Beautiful Lifetime Gift Sets
by4
Gifts of lasting quality and usefulness. Highest quality
Clauss scissors and shears ... expertly made of finest
surgical steelsc Sparkling sewing and scissors sets...
handsomely encased in fine leathers. See them todayl

116 North Fourth Ave.
Opposite Court House
Phone 2-2549

Women of the University Facul-O
ty: Tea, 4 to 6 p.m., Dec. 14, 4th
floor clubroom, League.

11

CALKINS-FLETCHER Drug Stores
324 South State 818 South State

11

I

Al
on
A. Sure-to-please jewelry
in gold, rhinestones and
pearls. Earrings
Bracelets, Necklaces,
$1.00 up.
C. Cuddly - warm scarves
to keep her curls neat
and warm. Wool and
silk. From 69c to $1.95

Gift -able
CCESSOHIES
. . . for the girls
i your shopping list!
B. Gleaming hosiery cases
to keep her stockings
new. This one at $4.95
Others at $1.00 up.

GREYHOUND LINES & SHORTWAY LINES

announce

.A

SPECIAL BUS SERVICE
For The Holiday Vacation
RESERVED SEATS - THROUGH BUSES
FROM ANN ARBOR

*

S
t

*n
ekE
"Affectionately
z{? y 3 " Yours'
r :' *
y .'. ,y++ "r
* Fil.
Christmas Card

lb

TO:

1-way fare *Round
trip fare

CHICAGO, ILL.
NEW YORK, N.Y.
PITTSBURGH, PA.
GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.
CLEVELAND, OHIO
BUFFALO, N.Y.
SAGINAW, MICH.
BAY CITY, MICH.

$ 4.85
13.50
6.10
3.20
3.95
6.80

$ 8.75
24.30
11.00
5.80
7.15
12.25
4.80
5.35

2.65
2.95

"All fares subject to 15% Fed. transportation tax

c* , o
O .
ffffffjjjj ; 0 ,t
/i
q v1 ,. 4 : ' ,

D. Dainty lace - trimmed
blouses in crepe and
nylon, prints and solid

Buses will leave Mich. Union at 3:45 P.M.

V

What sweeter way to send your special

Friday, December 16th

i

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