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December 11, 1949 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, DECtMBER 11, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIFTEEN,

Pearls, Jet, Rhinestone Clips
Ornament Velvet, Satin Hats-

With Christmas festivities just
around the corner, coeds are be-
ginning to plan for this party and
that tea, and along with these
plans go thoughts of what hat
should be worn to each.
Styled to add charm to the short
dinner dress or theatre suit, yet
not to obstruct anyone's view, are
little cocktail hats in black velvets
and velours, trimmed with pearls,
rhinestones or jet.
THE SNUG-fitting cloche is one
of the most popular styles of the
Bulbs Endure
Test of Time
Time was when the harried
Christmas shopper would dash out
at the last minute to buy an al-
ways available supply of fruit and
flowers for that just-remembered
aunt or cousin.
Not so today. Collections of
bulbs which are easily grown for
winter blossoming right in the
house, including narcissus, sweet-
scented iris, crocus, hyacinth,
daffodils and tulips, are some of
the most valued gifts by stay-at-
homes who appreciate an indoor
garden.

season. For the formal tea or
cocktail party a crown of fine net
with tracings of tiny black se-
quins, framed by a black velvet
brim and accented by small velvet
bows and pearl or rhinestone tear
drops, is a popular style of the
cloche.
Satin and maline also figure
prominently in hatf abrics this
season.eBlack has been impor-
tant, but colors have also been
put to much use.
A novel point of view that was
introduced this year is the idea
that detail should be centered at
the crown rather than at the front
of the hat.
ILLUSTRATING this idea is the
cusion cap of satin. The top of
the crown is open and elaborated
with a motif of jet. Accent is add-
ed by a shadowing of black maline
extended at the front of the hat.
Also using a veiling of maline
is a brief cap with a cuff-like
fold at the back manipulated
into the crown at the front and
sparkling with jet or rhine-
stones.
Another popular style is the tiny
rolled silhouette, with the crown
covered by multi-layers of maline
caught down on either side with a
jet ornament.

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
CANDY HOUSE-Helen Waldorf and Carol Wilcox admire Christmas Cottage made by Mrs. Wil-
liam Goodale, house director at Alpha Chi Omega. The miniature house is constructed of white
frosting and candy.
TWINKLE, TWINKLE:
Proper Cutting Ach ieves Gem Perfection

Bells, Bows
To Decorate
Season's Gifts
In spite of the fact that people
have been wrapping Christmas
presents for generations, not all of
the ideas as to how to add original- I
ity to holiday gift wrappings have
been used.
The gift-wrapper who wants to
express his individuality, and who
has a knowledge of spatter-paint-
ing carried over from grade-school,
may find this art the answer to
lis problem of dressing up his
Christmas packages.
STARTING WITH plain white
or colored paper, one may decide
to stencil it with reindeer, snow-
men, Christmas trees, angels or
other appropriate holiday figures.
The name of the receiver or
yule greetings may be stenciled
instead of the figures, or in
combination with them. Names
and greetings may also be spelled
out in tiny gummed stars.
Cutting snowmen or snowballs
out of fluffy white cotton and past-
ing them on packages wrapped in
plain colored paper is another way
which the person with artistic ten-
dencies (developed or undeveloped)
,an brighten up his gifts.
MINIATURE CHRISTMAS tree
balls can add color to packages as
well as to Christmas trees. They
are especially pretty when tied on
packages wrapped in metallic
paper.
Even though gifts wrapped in
paper and ribbon of the tra-
ditional Christmas colors are al-
ways attractive, some people
may find themselves with a de-
sire to try out new color schemes
this season.
In this case, they might experi-
ment with such combinations as
pale yellow paper with white rib-
bon or silvery-grey paper with
fuschia ribbon.
They might also try pale green
paper with silver or gold ribbon
or pale blue paper with dark green
ribbon.

HURRY to the

,. __ -

::/

1313 South University
... before we close
for the holidays!

: :
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CeC F'M
f*'
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XMIAS

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5-7
CHRIS TMAS
SUGGESTIONS
Combination Waffle Iron & Grill
TOASTERS
WAFFLE IRONS
Westinghouse & Nesco Roasters
I RONMASTERS TOASTMASTERS
MIXMASTERS COFFEEMASTERS
PRESTO and MIRRO-MATIC
PRESSURE COOKERS
REVERE WARE
ARTHUR G. BEDEN
216 East Huron Street Phone 7181

Christmas is an excellent time
for those who have long been con-
templating to invest in an en-
gagement ring to realize this de-
sire.
The spirit of giving envelops
everyone, and this season helps to
set the mood.
The prospective diamond buyer
should consider many things be-
fore actually taking home the
ring. Usually for the engagement
ring, which is the most prevalent
use of the diamond, perfection
rather than size is desired.
* * *
TO BEST reveal the perfection
of the stone a fine cut is needed.
The proper cutting also brings out
the greatest beauty in a gem.
Gem cutting is not simple es-
pecially when it is remembered
that only a diamond can cut
another.
There are three operations
necessary in cutting a diamond-
bruting, polishing and cleaving.
* * *
IN BRUTING a diamond, two
stones are cemented into holders
and then the two are rubbed to-
gether until the constant friction
changes the shape on the one to
be cut to the form desired.
During this process a fine dia-
mond powder, much like that
from a slate pencil, is ground
off and falls into a sieve beneath.
This powder is later used to pol-
ish the stone.
The stone, having been shaped,
is ready to be polished. It is taken
from the holder into which it was

cemented and is soldered into a
cone of tin and lead called a "dop."
* * *
THE SMALL flat facets of the
crystal are then polished off by a
revolving wheel or "skeif."
When gems are very irregular
in shape or are marred by seri-
ous imperfections, large sections
of them must sometimes be tak-
en off.
This is done by splitting the
stone in the direction on its nat-
ural cleavage. Every crystal has a
natural tendency to break off in
the line of its planes or fac'es.
MOST TRANSPARENT gem
stones are cut in a round shape.
This affords more brilliance. The
rounded surface is surrounded by
thirty-two facets reaching from
the edge towards the center. At
the back there are twenty-four
facets which form a pyramid. This
shape is most commonly used in
rings.
The emerald is commonly cut
square or oblong. Stones such
as the opal and moonstone are
polished off with a curved sur-
face.
Gem cutting is relatively recent.
The ancients had no knowledge of
crystals or of minerals, and there-
fore they wore their jewels uncut
or they cut them in a crude fash-
ion quitemregardless of their real
formation.
It was sometime in the fifteenth
century that a gem cutter from
Bruges discovered that a diamond

could be made far more brilliant
by so arranging its facets that the-
light would reflect through them
and split into prismatic rays.
The same methods that were
discovered then are still used to-
day.
Rings, Bracelets
Bear Timepieces
Giving a watch is no longer the
simple process of picking out one
for the wrist to suit the taste for
they come in every imaginable
variety this year.
Today watches will not only
deck the hand on a band, but also
dangling from a chain on the
wrist much as a charm on a brace-
let.
Lapel time pieces date back to
quite a few years ago, but some-
thing definitely new is the ring
watch and the pocket piece in an
etched sterling case that snaps
open when the sides are pressed.

I_

BARGAINS GALORE!

Clearing all stock at
RIDICULOUSLY LOW PRICES

I

I

t

SOX!!

SOX!!

SOX!!

ItI

3Apr. for $1.00
12,000 pairs of manufacturers'
surplus. 75c to $1 .50 values.
Fruit-of-the-Loom
HAN DKERCH IEFS,
10 for $1.00
Take Ten of These and BLOW!

-. ____________________.1

FEMININE GIFTS
To Be Treasured by Every "She"

^ '
._./
"' i
,. ~
S -.

Silver-
Grey
$1295.
" Quilt
Lined
" Mouton
Collar

B-15
Army 0. D.
$1295
"Alpaca
or Quilt
Lined

HOSIERY is the perfect gift.
These are sheer to the touch
and beautifying to the leg.
$1.10 to $1.68

.- 1
Y S at' c ,

GLOVES ... to keep her
in good hand. Either fab->
ric or beautifully favoredj
pigskin. Shorties or long rt
styles. $2.00 to $5.00.
COSTUME JEWELRY ...
Gleaming rhinestones,
t snow white pearls, silver"
and gold to match any
costume. She can al-
ways use it. $1.00 up to
$25.00.
SCARVES. Beautiful prints in
pure silk and chiffons. Here are
designs and colors that are a com-
pliment to your good taste and
hers. $1.00 to $3.50
BLOUSES. Here is a large selec-
tion of what women deam an in-
}° jI \ t dispensable part of their word-
lrobe. She can dress them up or
\ 1 ok down. $2.98 to $14.95

Manufacturer's
CLOSE-OUT
of All-Wool
$10.00 SWEATERS
$395
All Wool Navy Blue $495
BLANKETS .............
Wool Army Gloves, Mittens ........59c
Army Air Force Gloves ...........$4.95
W atch Bands .................
Expansion Watch Bands ..........49c
G. I. Foot Powder ................ 12c
Navy T-Neck Sweaters ..........$2.99
Navy T-Shirts .............6 for $2.90
Army and Navy Shorts ............59c

HEY GIRLS!.!
Get that "important" Xmas Gift for that
"important" man in your life - he prefers
a Saffell & Iush label in that gift.

if

11

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