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December 11, 1949 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1949-12-11

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TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECMERii 11, 1949

I I

Exam Reading Period

N ITS EAGERNESS to push an extended
Thanksgiving vacation, Student Legisla-
ture has over-looked another far more
needed "calendar" change. This is the
so-called "Dead Week," a period (not nec-
essarily a whole week) set aside immed-
iately preceeding exams, in which no class-
es are held. In this time the student has
a chance to review, organize and integrate
the material in his courses unhampered by
the additional concern of attending classes
and undergoing last minute blue books,
papers and other class assignments.
The "Dead Week" or "Reading Period"
system of exam studying is used by sev-
eral colleges throughout the country and
has proven more satisfactory than the ar-
rangement at the University.
This latter set-up has two basic faults.
It does not enable the student to study as
thoroughly as he might like to, or NEED to,
and it forces him to approach his studying
from the standpoint of what's going to be
on the exam. In order to conserve time he
gambles and selects for study only the
material which he guesses and hopes will
be required of him on the fateful day.

In this way he misses the whole point of
the course.
Prof. Preston Slosson in a recent letter
to the editor noted with emphasis that "the
greater purpose of an examination is to re-
quire the student to organize his knowledge
... this is what makes the examination so
valuable as a teaching device."
It has been impressed upon us that the
University runs on, a SCHEDULE and
there is no time to allot a special period
for pre-exam study. And yet we are
talking about extending a holiday. Where
do we get the time for that?
It would be gratifying to see SL apply as
much energy to securing a "Dead Week"
as it has exerted in agitating for a longer
Thanksgiving vacation.
SL, which prides itself on being the
voice of the campus, might well consider
the current student movement to suggest
improvement in the University's education
system. An' SL project in the direction of
"Dead Week" would be right in keeping with
the spirit and timeliness of this campaign.
-Nancy Bylan

Federal Research Grants

HE FEDERAL Government will grant
American colleges and universities more
than $100,000,000 for research this year-a
sum which could almost cover all of the basic
research projects which university scientists
have ever dreamed of undertaking. And yet
the net result of this tremendous investment
will probably only be the wholesale produc-
tion of "gadgets" and deadly weapons which
will be completely outmoded within a decade.
In our modern society where the college
or university is expected to serve as the
stimulus center for scientific progress, as
well as the hub of educational develop-
ment, few people will disagree with the
principle of Federal support for such in-
stitutions. Private schools have long since
lost the vast field of private endowments
on which they were built and state legis-
latures have either lacked the ability or
the foresight to provide funds for adequate
research.
But the government, however, currently
engaged in a mad scramble for arms suprem-
acy and technical leadership, is completely
losing sight of the need for fundamental
basic research and instead is pouring out
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: JIM BROWN

millions of dollars for projects which will be
of only momentary significance.
Here at the University, for instance, Fed-
eral agencies will grant more than $3,000,000
for research work, most of which will be
channeled into various departments for the
development of specific projects and instru-
ments which will be of practical use to the
government for only a limited number of
years.
Nor can the University be blamed for ac-
cepting such research grants, even though it
may realize their shallow significance. Funds
provided by the government do permit insti-
tutions to hire a greater number of highly
skilled men which add to the intellectual
stature of the campus community and also
facilitate a much greater expansion of re-
search equipment.
Nevertheless, the government is failing
to realize that all progress in applied sci-
ence must necessarily stem from previous
development of the basic sciences. And
what better place to conduct this basic
research than in the modern university
from which most intellectual development
supposedly stems.
Instead of allocating funds to educational
institutions for the development of gadgets
and weapons the government should develop
independent laboratories and research cen-
ters as it did at Oak Ridge during the war.
For if it continues to force an extreme em-
phasis on the applied sciences in our univer-
sities, it will cause a stagnation of funda-
mental thought and long range progress.
-Jim Brown

ROLLING STONES
O.. .by Harold Jackson
Ollie the Oracle ...
WHEN WE THINK of Christmas, we nat-
urally think of Ollie Jensen, the philo-
sophical Swede, because he is bedecked in
Christmas colors all 12 months of the year
-a very red nose, and slightly green around
the gills.
And so it was Ollie we decided to con-
sult about what we could give you readers
for Christmas-besides the scalp of that
literature prof. who scheduled an exam for
the Friday before vacation.
We found the Swede sitting on an old
aspirin case in the middle of his garret,
surrounded by books, studying hard.
"Bluebook?" we asked.
"Heck no, I'm boning up for the vaca-
tion," he grunted, pointing to the title of
his book: Mighty Egg-Nogs I Have Met.
We noted that the picture of Ollie's lady-
friend was turned toward the wall anti asked
if she was going to be included in his
Christmas festivities.
"I dunno," he answered. "She was in
the doghouse with me for being so con-
ceited over that story you printed last
week about her outfoxing me-but strange-
ly enough a dog has gotten her out.
"Seems she got into a guzzling contest
with a Great Dane last night and came out
a poor second. She claims it was because
the dog had four feet to hold him up while
she only had two.
"But she's not half so arrogant now, and
if she plays her cards right, we may get
together."
We explained to Ollie the purpose of our
visit and his suggestion was immediate.
"Why don't you give the three people
who read your column a real laugh just
once. Why don't you print my two can-
didates for the greatest Christmas story
of all time?"
And so, accepting Ollie's challenge, here
are the Swede's two favorite fables with
the hope that they may become part of a
bright and memorable Christmas for each
of you:
Yule Log, Hell .. ,
IT WAS A genuinely Old English yuletide
scene that greeted the Southerner spend-
ing his first Christmas in the North as he
gazed from the window of his host's home
at the neighboring cottage of the Willoughby
family.
Soft, lace-like snow fell easily through
the Christmas Eve darkness and banked
itself over the cottage's roof, bushes and
ground in friendly patterns of moonlight
and shadows.
Thin, silken smoke spiralled from the
chimney, and the lights of the cottage sent
shafts of warm amber across the clean
snow.
"Why this is as beautiful as the pint-
ings on Christmas cards," the Southerner
said excitedly to his host.
"AND LOOK-the Willoughby family is
observing that grand old English custom of
bringing in the Yule Log on Christmas Eve.
SEE - the whole family's out in back.
THEY'RE BRINGING IN THE YULE LOG
NOW."
The host pushed past the wide-eyed
Southerner, took a look, and turned dis-
gustedly to his guest.
"Yule Log hell," he said, "THAT'S WIL-
LOUGHBY."
* if * * *
A Bitter Pill. .
THINGS LOOKED BAD for a small church
in England that couldn't afford new
hymn books until the town millionaire, J.J.
Beecham, said he'd provide 'em if he could
"put a little advertising in each book.''
Grudgingly the church fathers accepted
the offer, and eagerly they examined the
fine new books when they arrived-but
they couldn't find a single ad.

In fact there was no hint of an ad all
year until the congregation stood up on
Christmas Eve to sing "Hark the Herald
Angels Sing." And this is what came out:
"Hark the Herald Angels Sing,
Beecham's Pills are just the thing;
Peace on Earth and Mercy Mild,
Two for Adult, One for Child."
New Books at General Library
Bolton, Herbert E., Coronado, Knight
of Pueblos and Plains, New York,. McGraw-
Hill Book Co., Inc., 1949.
Bush, Vannevar, Modern Arms and Free
Men. New York, Simon and Schuster, 1949.
Vittorini, Elio, In Sicily, New York, New
Directions Book, 1949.
Wecter, Dixon, ed., The Love Letters of
Mark Twain, New York, Harper & Brothers,
1949.
NEW YORK-(1P-Francis Cardinal Spell-
man requested New York's Catholics to
pray for rain for three months, and the
Water Commissioner urged installation, of
water meters, as the city's water supplies
lessened steadily.
The city's reservoirs are nearly two-
thirds empty. A vast campaign against
waste has been launched.
The Cardinal requested prayers for rain
in masses throughout the archdiocese.
tions-as long as they don't put it in
writing .
Secretary of State Acheson may deny it,
but he has authorized George Kennan to be-

TIME OF CLASS

Monday
Monday;
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8 ...........................M on.,
9.......................Mon.,
10......... ................W ed.,
11 ...........................Fri.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

1 . ... ....................
2 ....................
3 ' ''....................

... Sat., Jan.
...Wed., Feb.
...'Thurs., Feb.

30,
23,
25,
27,
28,
1,
2,
31,
24,
26,
28,

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOI OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
JANUARY 23-FEBRUARY 3, 1954
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and recitations,
the time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the
week; for courses having recitations only, the time of the class
is the time of the first recitation period. Certain courses will
be examined at special periods as noted below the regular
schedule. 12 o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes
and other "irregular" classes may use any examination period
provided there is no conflict (or one with conflicts if the con-
flicts are arranged for by the "irregular" class). A final ex-
amination on February 3 is available for "irregular" classes
which are unable to utilize an earlier period.
Each student should receive notification from his instruc-
tor as to the time and place of his examination. In the College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination
may be changed without the consent of the Committee on Ex-
aminations.

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12

TIME OF EXAMINATION

8....
9....
10....
11....

........................T ues.,
........................T ues.,
.........................Thurs.,
........................Sat.,

Jan.
Jan..
Jan.
Jan.

Continued from Page 2
In accordance with this rule,
students planning to spend Christ-
mas vacation outside Ann Arbor
must return Library books to the
Charging Desk of the General Li-
brary (or the proper Divisional
Library) before leaving the city.
Special permission to charge
books for use outside Ann Arbor
may be given in case of urgent
need. Arrangements must be made
at the Charging Desk for books
from the General Library or with
Librarians .i charge of Divisional
Libraries.
Students taking Library books
from Ann Arbor without permis-
sion are liable to a fine of $1.00.
Approved Christmas caroling
parties:
December 12
Mortarboard-Senior Society -
Scroll-Wyvern
Wenley House-Jordan
December 13
Collegiate Sorosis
Delta Delta Delta
Delta Tau Delta
Mary Louis Hinsdale
Kappa Kappa Giamma-Sigma
Alpla Epsilon
Kappa Sigma
League Houses and West Quad-
rangle
Lloyd House-Kleinstuck
Newberry Residence
Alice Freeman Palmer House
December 14
Alpha Delta Pi
Alpha Omicron Pi-Alpha Sigma
Phi
Angell House
Beta Theta Pi-Pi Beta Phi
Betsy Barbour
Congregational Disciple Guild
Delta Upsilon
Delta Zeta
Deutscher Verein
Hiawatha Club
Intercooperative Council
Jordan Hall-Prescott House
Phi Kappa Tau-Alpha Gamma
Delta
Sigma Chi-Delta Gamma
Sigma Delta Tau
Stockwell Waitresses
Theta Xi
Theta Chi
Winchell House
December 15
Acacia
Canterbury Club
Adelia Cheever
Kappa Alpha Theta
Kappa Nu
Lawyer's Club
Michigan Christian Fellowship
Mosher Hall
Phi Gamma Delta'
Phi Kppa Sigma
Roger Wifiams Guild
Stevens Cooperative
Lectures

Concerts
Rise Stevens, mezzo-soprano of
the Metropolitan Opera Company,
radio, motion pictures, and con-
certs, will give the sixth program
in the Choral Union Series Mon.,
Dec. 12, 8:30 p.m., Hill Auditbriiftn.,
Program: Songs and arias by Han-
del, Massenet, Schumann, Strauss,
Brahms, Wolf, Rachmaninoff, St.
Leger, and Bizet.
A limited number of tickets are
available at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society, and will
also be on sale at the Hill Audito-
rium box office one hour proceding
the concert.
String Quartet Class under the
direction of Oliver Edel and Paul
Doktor, will present a program at
3:30 p.m., Tues., Dec. 13, in the
Rackham Assembly Hall, to which
the public is invited. It will in-
clude Beethoven's "Rasoumouvsky
Quartets," with Edward Troupin,
Donald Miller, Larry Owen, Lois
Utzinger, Genevieve Shanklin, and
Andrew Lisko, violinists, Theodore
Powell, David Ireland, and Donald
Sandford, violists, and Harriet
Risk, David Baumgartner and
Joan Lewis, cellists.

Political
at regular
Library.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Science 366 will meet
time Monday in 406

T

'p

The Mathematics Orientation
Seminar: 3 p.m., Mon., Dec. 12,
3001 Angell Hall. Miss Ingersoll
will present Brouwer's, "The Na-
ture of Geometry."
Organic Chemistry Seminar:
7:30 p.m., Mon., Dec. 12, 1300
Chemistry. Topic: "The Hooker
Oxidation of 2-Hydroxynaphtho-
quinones. Speaker: Gilbert Sloan.

Y

1 ...........................W ed., Feb.
2 ...........................Thurs., Feb.
3 ...........................Fri., Jan.

1, 2- 5
2, 9-12
27 2- 5
3, 9-12

Conflicts and Irregular ..................Fri.,

Feb.

These regular examination periods have precedence over any
special period scheduled concurrently. Conflict must be ar-
ranged for by the instructor of the "special" class.
SPECIAL PERIODS

English 1, 2 ...................
Psychology 31 .................
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31,

32, 61, 62, 91, 92, 93,1

153 ......

Speech 31, 32 .................
German 1, 2, 31 ...............
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ...........
Botany 1; Zoology 1 ...........
Chemistry 1, 3, 21, 55 ....,.. . .
Sociology 51, 54, 90 ..............
Political Science 1 .............
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 101 ...
Russian 1 .....................

. .........Mon.,
..........M on.,
..... ......Tues.,
..........Tues.,
.........Wed.,
..........W ed..
...........Thurs.,
. ...... , ..Fri.,
..........M on.,
. .........Mon.,
..........Tues.,
........Thurs.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.

24,
24,
25,
25,
26,,
27,
30,
30,
31,
2,

2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-
2-

5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5

Jan. 23, 2- 5
Jan. 23, 2- 5

Class Attendance Rule

LAST WEEK'S literary college regulation
change concerning class absences vir-
tually squelched an ill-grounded rumor
prevalent last year that the college would
arbitrarily set a limit on unexcused ab-
sences with a penalty for absences over and
above this limit.
If the rumor had become reality, it
would have meant that students would
be forced to attend classes under threat,
an extremely juvenile situation in an
adult college. Such an ironclad regula-
tion would approximate an army-type
regimentation and in a sense turn the
college into a military camp where stu-
dents could be legally purged for being
AWOL.
The college, however, was not anticipating
anything so drastic, as was evidenced by
last week's announcement of the regulation
change which, in a sense, served as a con-
firmation of the college's basic stand on
this issue.
The regulation change itself was minor,
consisting only of the omission of an am-
biguous clause for the purposes of clarifica-
tion.
What is important, however, is the fact
that the basic rule of the college remained
unchanged. The regulation states: "Stu-
dents are expected to attend classes regu-
larly. If the instructor considers hie
number of absences excessive, he may
send a written report on the case to the
Administrative Board for action."
The underlying sentiment of the regula-
tion places faith in the individual student's
integrity and intelligence, which is as it
should be. It doesn't dictate to the student
or obligate the instrucor. It is a ruling
which is as fundamentally realistic as the
college could make it.
The true meaning of the regulation may
possibly be obscure, but in reading between
the lines it boils down to this:
The issue of class attendance is an
individual matter between instructor and
student and can best be handled by them.
The college does not desire to interpose
any arbitrary ruling which would indi-
Naughty Neckline
ALAS, poor Princess Margaret! The kid got
herself born in the wrong time of the
monarchy.
Time was when Maggie could have worn

cate loss of faith in the integrity of the
instructor-student relationship.
This is the extent to which the college
intends to control class attendance. This
attitude will coninue as long as the student
ably accepts the responsibility toward his
education and does not take undue advant-
age of the faith placed in him by the college:
Otherwise, the college may as well disband
to conduct a correspondence school.
-Walter Vogtmann
MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Sawyer Report
By DREW PEARSON
WASHINGTON - One reason the public
knows so little about the giant ktrusts
that control American industry is the aura
of secrecy in which they are permitted to
operate-sometimes with the help of the
federal government.
The other day, for instance, Secretary
of Commerce Charles Sawyer issued a
report on monopolistic trends in business
in which he presented elaborate tables
showing the growth of monopoly.
However, Sawyer left out a most impor-
tant detail-the names of corporations re-
sponsible for the- alarming growth. Sawyer
aides stated that the Census Bureau might
"violate the law" if it furnished Sawyer br
anyone else with the names of individual
companies, since this was a "confidential"
matter.
The Merry-Go-Round is happy to fill
in the blank spaces in the Sawyer Report,
obtained from other official sources.
Here are the four big concerns which he
said controlled 55.7 per cent of the nation's
automobile output: General Motors, Ford,
Chrysler, and Hudson.
And here are the names of the eight
companies which the Commerce Secretary
said controlled. 89.6 per cent of the tire and
inner-tube business: Goodyear, Firestone,
U.S. Rubber, B. F. Goodrich, General Tire
and Rubber, Dayton Rubber, Seiberling, and
the Lee Rubber and Tire Corporation.
Probably the greatest monopoly of all,
however, is cigarettes, 90.4 per cent of which
is cornered by four firms, according to
Sawyer. They are: American Tobacco
(Lucky Strikes), R. J. Reynolds (Camels),
iggett-Myers (Chesterfields) and Loril-
lard (Old Golds).

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well, as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for
credit in any unit of the University. For time and place of ex-
aminations, see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
JANUARY 23 to FEBRUARY 3, 1950
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time
of the first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between as-
signed examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside of Room 3209, East Engineering
Building between January 9 and January 14 for instruction.
To avoid misunderstanding and errors each student should re-
ceive notification from his instructor of the time and place of
his appearance in each course during the period January 23
to February 3.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee.

TIME OF CLASS

University Choir, Maynard.
Klein, Conductor, will present its
annual Christmas concert at 8:30
p.m., Tues., Dec. 13, Hill Audito-
rium. The program will include
compositions by Victoria, Prae-
torius, Palestrina, Gabrieli; Bach,
Rachmaninoff, Britten, alid
Vaughan Williams. The choir
will be assisted by the Repertory
Orchestra with Carol Neilson and
Norma Heyde, soprano soloists,
and Priscilla Eitel, harpist.
The general public is invited.
Exhibitions
Exhibit of photographs by Irv-
ing Penn, collection from the
Museum of Modern Art; Dec. 6
through Dec. 15. First floor corri-
dor, Architecture Bldg.
Seventh Annual Advertising 1iZ-
hibition by Detroit Artists; aukl-
pices of the Scarab Club, Detroit,
Dec. 5 through Jan. 4, Exhibition
Galleries, Rackham Bldg.
Museum of Art. Alumni Meno-
rial Hall: The Arabian Nights' by
Chagall and Art privately owned
in Ann Arbor, through December
31; weekdays 9-5, Sundays 24.
The public is invited.
(C o n tin u e d o n P a g e )

TIME OF EXAMINATION

Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at

8 ...........................M on.,
9 ........................... M on.,
10 .................. .....Wed.,
11 ..................E.....r.,
1 ...........................Sat.,
2 ........................Wed.,
3'........................Thurs.,:
8 ...........................Tues.,
9 ........................... Tues.,
10 ..................... ..Thurs.,,
11......... ................ Sat.,
1 ...........................W ed.,
2 ...........................Thurs.,:
3 ......................... .Fri.,

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.

30,
23,
25,
27,
28,
1,
2,
31,
24,
26,
28,
1,
2,
27

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5

Lecture, auspices of the Depart-
ment of English Language and
Literature. "The Construction of
Shakespeare's Plays." Dr. Here-
ward T. Price, Professor of Eng-
lish, 8 p.m., Tues., Dec. 13. Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for George
Maurice rover, Physics; thesis:
"Design of a New Type of Cloud
Chamber ,aid its Use in the Study
of High Energy Particles," 1:15
p.m., Mon., Dec. 12, W. Council
Rm. Rackham Bldg. Chairman,
H. R. Crane,
Doctoral Examination for John
S. Malik, Physics; thesis: "A Fre-
quency Modulated Accelerating
System for a Racetrack Synchro-
tron," Tues., Dec. 13, E. Council
Rm., Rackham Bldg., 1:15 p.m.
Chairman, H. R. Crane.
Doctoral Examination for Jay
Dykhouse, Education; thesis:
"Dualism in American Public Edu-
cation Since 1906 with Special
Reference to the Vocational Edu-
cation Movement," Tues., Dec. 13,
4019 University Iigh School, 3
p.m. Chairman, A. B. Moehlman.
Doctoral Examination for John
Edward Dougherty, Physics;
thesis: "Synchrotron Injection,"
Tues., Dec. 13, W. Council Rm.,
Rackham Bldg., 3 p.m. Chairman,
H. R. Crane.
Bacteriology Seminar, Tues.,
Dec. 13, 10:30 a.m. Rm. 1520 E.
Medical Bldg. Speaker: Dr. Carl A.
Lawrence. Subject: Chemotherapy{
of Tuberculosis. ,
English 149 (Playwriting) will
meet Monday evening, Dec. 12, in-
stead of Tuesday evening, Dec. 13.
Mathematical Logic Seminar:
7:30 p.m., Mon., Dec. 12, 3217 An-
gell Hall. Mr. G. Spencer will con-
clude his discussion of recursively
enumerable sets of positive in-
tegers and their decision problems.

Fifty-Ninth Year
Edited and managed by students !i
the University of Michigan' widr t hi
authority of the Board in Control ca
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Leon Jaroff............Managi dit
Al Blumrosen........ ..... sty K11ito
Philip Dawson.... Editorial D
Mary Stein..........Associate 4i1
Jo Misner......n......Associate WO
George Walker.........Associate Editor
Don McNeil . .....Associate $dltos
Alex Lmanian. Photography N4tI
Pres Holmes......... Sports Qo'.itor
Merle Levini.......... Sports Co-Udt
Roger Goelz. Associate Sports. ditw
Miriam Cady...........Women's Z1tor
Lee Kaltenbach...Associate WoMAO'& E4.
Joan King............
Allan Claznage ...Assistant Lim'tS
Business Staff
Roger Wellington.... .Busineah 314g*
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Draw. 3; Eng. 11; C.E. 1, 2; M.E. 136.....*Mon., Jan. 23, 2- 5
Draw. 2; E.E. 5, 160; French ............. *Tues., Jan. 24,. 2- 5
C.E. 22; E.M. 1, 2; German, Spanish .....*Wed., Jan. 25, 2- 5
Draw. 1; M.E. 13, 135; Physics 45 .......*Thurs., Jan. 26, 2- 5
Chem. 1, 3; C.E. 21 ................... *Fri., Jan. 27, 2- 5
Ch-Met. 1; M.P. 3, 4, 5, 6............. ..*Mon., Jan. 30, 2- 5
Economics 53, 54, 101............ . *Tues., Jan. 31, 2- 5
Conflicts and Irregular ..................Fri., Feb. 3, 9-12
Evening, 12 o'clock and "irregular" classes may use any of
the periods marked * provided there is no conflict. The final
period on February 3 is available in case no earlier period can
be used.

.{

BARNABY
Gosh! You've been inside An ancestor of mine
onurice no nal this time- II took over when the

IWith a few 9f Gosh, M. O'Maley-l
minor brak- E ven onrrirmatrrl

The trouble's in this control, I think.
The motor keens runninn at tn snoed--

11

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