100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 07, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



TiiE MCICIGAN DAII ILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1949

I I U

NLY HITS MAKE PROFIT:
Windt Claims Broadway
Tickets Too Expensive

Vacation Rush

By NANCY BYLAN
Tickets to Broadway shows are
so expensive that theatre-goers
are not willing to spend money on
anything but the highly-celebrat-
ed, "must-see" hits, according to
Prof. Valentine Windt of the
speech department.
Prof. Windt deplored this "great
curse of the theatre" as the reason
CED To Vote
On Pamphlet,
Bias Clauses
Committee to End Discrimina-
tion members voted yesterday to
wait until today for decisions on a
projected pamphlet and constitu-
tional bias clauses of member
groups.
Chairman Leon Rechtman, '50,
announced plans for a pamphlet
"to clarify CED's positions." The
pamphlet would ask why questions
of race, religion and family back-
ground appear on application
blanks.
Lyn Marcus, '50, chairman of
the Young Democrats asked the
CED to straighten out its internal
positions before deciding on the
pamphlet. The pamphlet approval
motion was tabled.
A motion to limit CED member-
ship to those groups which have
no bias clauses in their constitu-
tions was also tabled. The motii
would affect only one group, sec-
retary Leah Marks, '52, said.
CED will meet at 5:15 p.m. today
in the Union.
Foresters To Hold
Union Coffee Hour
Fresh from their Paul Bunyan
ball fling, students and faculty
members of the forestry school will
be- honored guests at a coffee hour
at 4 p.m. today in the Union's sec-
ond floor Terrace Room.
. These student-faculty coffee
hours are sponsored from time to
time by the Union in order to give
students in a particular field of
study a chance. to discuss their
problems with their professors.
CHRISTMAS
MAIL ORDER"
SPECIAL
Distributors of exceptionally high
quu.Ut yperfume bring you their most
outstanding fragrance at greatly re-
duced prices. A full years supply.. .
"" "2-Fluid Ounce Bottle of
Enchanting PERFUME
in a magnificently 98
designed'.bottle. Fe.Txc.
Formerly . $24.50 Fed. Tax Incl
Forerl . ~$2.5OPostpaid, or C. .
MONEY-BACK . plus postage
GUARANTEE -
If not completeey F R E E
delighted with ne Pelted (18
fume keep the Dis- Caat)Pok-
penser and return et Dispenser
perfume unsealed with every
within 5 days for order. It's a
Durchase price re- gift in itself.
fund.
JARNAC PRODUCTS CO.
- Paris New York
15 PARK ROW, NEW YORK 7, N. Y.

why only a few plays are bringin
in the majority of the profits or
Broadway, a condition discusse
in a recent story by The Associat-
ed Press.
THESE HITS are "South Pa-
cific," "Kiss Me Kate," "Death of a
Salesman," "Miss Liberty," "Lost
in the Stars," "Mr. Roberts," an
"I Know My Love."
The article contends that au-
diences have become theatre-
wise and will wait for tickets to
"proved good shows rather than
go to mediocre entertainment."
The mediocrity of shows is more
often than not decided by critics'
Prof. Windt declared. People would
go to these plays if prices were
cheaper, he said.
Many of the shows that close are
better than the movies that draw
such large audiences because of
their cheaper rates, he explained.
"THE GREAT HOPE of the
theatre is a theatre for the people
-who are interested in the emo-
tional experience and the enter-
tainment of play-going."
There has been much discussion
about the creation of a national
theatre and some institution to
train people for the stage and
counteract the attraction of Holly-
wood, Prof. Windt explained.
This may prove the solution
to the sorry condition of theatre
prices today, he added.
Another reason for the prepon-
derance of theatre income among
hit shows is the out-of-towner,
who comes to New York "with his
little list of hits."
* * *
"IT IS THESE transients that
keep the New York theatre alive."
Out-of-towners will pay any
price to see "South Pacific" and
be the envy of their not-so-for-
tunate friends, Prof. Windt said.
No sacrifice is too great-even get-
ting up at 7 a.m. to wait in line,
he observed.
"And the more difficult it is to*
get a ticket the more desperately
it is wanted. It gets to be a matter
that has little to do with the thea-
tre."
I UWF To Sponsor
Forum Tomorrow
The United World Federalists
will sponsor an open forum on the
subject "Is the Foreign Policy of
the United States Promoting
World War III?" at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow.
Prof. Marshall Knappen and
Henry Bretton, both of the politi-
cal science department, Prof. Ken-
neth Boulding, of the economics
department, and John Braum, a
University Regent, will take part
in the forum. The moderator will
be N. M. Efimenco, of the politi-
cal science department.
Read and Use
Daily Classified Ads

-Daily-Waily Barth
GOING HOME TRAIN-Students line up to buy reduced-priced
train tickets at the Administration Building. The Vulcans, engi-
neering honor society, have chartered special railroad coaches to
accommodate students traveling to New York, Chicago and Boston
for the Christmas vacation. Savings on these tickets are about
15 percent.
SUCCESSOR TO MANY:
IAU To Organize New
Campus Arts Magazine

The long-lamented absence of I
ai literary magazine- on campus
may soon come to an end with the
formation of a new quarterly of
the arts.
Inter-Arts Union has taken the
initial steps in founding such a
magazine by summoning all in-
terested students to an organi-
zational meeting at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in the League.
* * *
THE PROPOSED magazine will
be an all student project featuring
creative writing, critical analysis,
art and progressive advertising.
Students are needed to fill edi-
torial, business, layout and adver-
tising positions.
Since the demise of "Contem-
porary" in 1938, frustrated stu-
dent writers have had no mag-
azine outlet for their artistic
creations.
The first real campus literary
publications were monthlies put
out in the 1860's by such literary
societies as Alpha Nu, which pub-
lished the "Sybil."
THE "CASTALIAN," which later
became an annual publication of:
senior class independents and fi-
nally merged with the 'Ensian, had
its beginnings as a literary month-
ly.
Another early college quarter-
ly was the "Independent," which
was considered radical because
it expressed a bitter attitude to-
ward fraternities and hostility
toward the faculty.
In 1873 "Sapphire", a notorious
magazine of 70 pages, flashed
across the campus scene and made
a hurried exit.
UNTIL 1900 the sophomore class
published "Oracle" as its contri-
bution to the literary field.
"Inlander", the most famous
of campus literary magazines,
appeared in 1891 and with some
suspensions of publication, last-
ed into the 1920's. In later years
it was rent by a policy quarrel
over excluding non - student
manuscripts from publication.
"Chimes", called the "campus
opinion" monthly was composed of
"trashy interviews and stories
reeking with pathos", according to
one critic. One of its features was
a "Hot Off the Diagonal" column

It's demise was credited to the lack
of enough campus opinion to keep
it going.
DURING THE HEYDAY of
"Chimes", "Sunday Magazine", a
supplement to the Daily, took over
the literary criticism field. It was
well-known for never being read.
In 1893, the University's first
humor magazine, a "tame police
gazette" called the "Wrinkle",
appeared on campus only to die
of inanity three decades later.
The year 1934 saw the birth of
three magazines. "Advance", the
magazine of creative imaginative
thought, enjoyed a record-break-
ing first issue sale. Its editors
made public apologies for a prema-
ture depletion of stock.
"THE INLAND REVIEW", a
critical and literary magazine, was
replaced by "Contemporary", de-
signed to "encourage writing on
campus and provide an opportun-
ity to publish the best material."
It was consistantly praised for its
excellence of quality.
A year later it was joined by
"Procession," a critical and cre-
ative journal "devoted to the
significant forces of literature
and art." Like many of the other
"art" magazines, it featured ar-
ticles by prominent "names" as
well as by students.
Two summer school magazines,
"Campus" and "Outlander" ap-
peared during this time as well as
a wide variety of professional
school publications.
* * *
IN CONTRAST to the meteoric
fortunes of most of the literary
college publications, the "Technic"
came out with mechanical regu-
larity since its first issue in 1885.
With the demise of "Contem-
porary" and "Panorama" there
was considerable agitation on
campus for another literaryma-
gazine. The Board in Control of
Student Publications appointed
a committee to study the matter,
and out of this came "Perspec-
tive," which reversed the policy
of its predecessors by accepting
only student manuscripts.
It appeared as a Sunday literary
supplement to the Daily and pre-
sented essays, poetry, reviews and
short fiction.

Police Begin
Crackdown
On Motorists
Drunk Drivers
To Lose Permits
"Holiday Hazards," starring
irunken drivers, has begun a 31-
day engagement at theatres, tav-
rns and police stations through-
)ut Michigan.
It's not a first-run movie by any
neans, but a state-wide traffic ac-
:ident prevention program, joint-
:y sponsored by Michigan cities
And the Michigan State Safety
commission.
IN EFFECT throughout Decem-
ber, the program will concentrate
on "the greatest single holiday
hazard, that of driving after
drinking," local Chief of Police
Casper M. Enkemann explained
yesterday.
Large red andrwhite posters,
emphasizing "Drunk Drivers
Lose Their Licenses," will be
placed in taverns, restaurants,
and office buildings from De-
troit to the Canadian border,
Chief Enkemann explained.
In addition, the motion picture
industries have prepared 70 "trail-
ers," warning drivers to keep away
from the wheel if they drink, he
said.
S * * *
AN ESTIMATED 2,000,000 Mich-
igan residents will be reached this
way, as 600 state theatres have of-
fered to show the trailers, Chief
Enkemann pointed out.
He noted that the official slo-
gan, "Drunk Drivers Lose their
Licenses," is appropriate be-
cause more than 50,000 drivers
have lost auto licenses under the
mandatory provisions of the
State law, passed nearly a dec-
ade ago.
Permit revocation now comes at
the rate of more than 5,000 per
year, he added.
DECEMBER-"the most fatal
month of the year"-claimed 195
lives last year throughout the
state, Chief Enkemann declared.
He pointed to a study just
completed by Michigan State
Police, revealing thatnduring the
critical hours between midnight
and 3 a.m., one of seven drivers
involved in fatal accidents were
reported last year as "under the
influence."
In addition, two out of five "had
been drinking,"'the study showed.
Plays To Be
Given at Ypsi
A few tickets remain for the
Margaret Webster Shakespeare
Company's production of "Julius
Caesar" and "Taming of the
Shrew."
"Julius Caesar" will be present-
ed at 3 p.m. today at Central High
School Auditorium, Ypsilanti.
"Taming of the Shrew" will be giv-
en at 8 p.m.
Members of the company are all
professional Broadway actors.
Louisa Horton and Kendell Clark
formerly with the New York Thea-
tre Guild,'will take part in the per-
formances.
A number of lower priced tick-
ets may be obtained at the door

according to Prof. Gerald Sanders
of the English department al
Michigan State Normal.
Pre-Dental Society
Seeks Members
Students interested in becoming
charter members of the first hon-
orary pre-dental fraternity at th(
University are being sought by Dor
Eifert, '51 LSA.
Eifert is representative of th
University of Toledo chapter of
Kappa Phi Sigma, which wa
founded on the Toledo campus ir
1928.
He asked interested students tc
contact him by calling 2-5644.
Oats To Oranges
California, once known as thi
"World's Granary," now export
more fruit and vegetables that
any other region in the world. Thi
name was given ot California dur.
ing the 1861's when tons of wheat
rye, oats, and barley were raise(
there.

Christmas trees of the future
may shed fewer needles if botan-
ists develope means to apply drop
hormones.
At least Prof. Carl D. LaRue,
of the botany department, adrait,
that there is a possibility that
evergreens might be sprayed with
a hormone to keep the needles on
the tree.
* * *
lIE POINTED out that hor-
mones could be applied at the ab-
sicission layer. The absicission'
layer is a series of cells at the
base of the leaf which loosen up
as the leaf grows.
The hormone treatment would
probably not be practical on a
commercial basis, since it wouldf
result in higher Christmas tree
costs, he said.
Baker To Tallh
To Teachers
George Baker, director of per-
>onnel of the Detroit Public
School, will speak at 4 p.m. to-
morrow in Rm. 1035 Angell Hall'
on teaching opportunities in De-
troit during the next few years.
Baker will also interview to-
morrow applicants for February
vacancies in the Detroit schools.
For appointments, teachers may
call the Bureau of Appointments,
Ext. 489.
Detroit plans to add about 400
teachers a year to its staff for
the next three years, the Bureau
announced. Openings exist in the
following elementary fields: home-
room, art, social studies and vocal
music.
Secondary school teachers with
M.A. degrees are needed in com-
mercial subjects, English and
home economics.

NON-SHEDDING TREE:
Hormones May Keep
Needles on Evergreens

But a few hormones would
help the shedding spruce tree.
Long a buyers' favorite becauserof
its compact shape, the black spruce
is a big offender in the dropping
department.
THE LOFTY FIR that serves as
traditional Christmas tree for most
families, Prof. LaRue said. Not so
compact as the black spruce, the
fir still manages to save its needles
and its popularity.
The long needled pine tree
and the short stemmed arbor
vitae also take their part in the
holiday festivities. But arbor
vitae is generally restricted to
such minor roles as wreathes
and decorations.
Cutting evergreen trees probably
doesn't curtail government con-
servation plans, Prof. LaRue in-
dicated. Most spruces are cut down
in the black bogs of Northern
Michigancwhere they grow in
abundance.
And some people grow ever-
greens just for the Christmas tree
trade, he said.
Read and Use
Daily Classified Ads

Make
FOLLETT'S
Your Christmas Shopping
Headquarters
for -~ .
GIFTS, CARDS, and WRAPPINGS
State Street at North U.

Cinema Group
Will Present
'BeckySharp'
A free movie, "Becky Sharp,"
will be presented by the Art Cin-
ema League this Friday, Saturday
and Sunday night.
An adaptation of William Make-
peace Thackeray's novel "Vanity
Fair," it is the story of a young
women who finds love and money
in two different people. Choosing
the one with money, she eventually
discovers that the materialistic
view is not always the most work-
able.
The picture will be shown at 6,
7:30 and 9 p.m. Friday, Saturday
and Sunday in the Architectural
Auditorium. There will be no for-
mal tickets and everyone is wel-
come according to Art Cinema
League Manager Art Moskoff.
A HAIR STYLE
FOR YOU ALONE!!
Our ladies' hair cutters are ex-
perienced and artful in creating
a hair style to your individual
needs-for the holidays.
The DASCOLA.BARBERS
Liberty near State

1
,

r
i
A

.r

or Holiday Wear...
and nyaer
AT THE DOWNTOWN STORE
HANDMACHER SUITS

S

--i

Formerly to 65.00 49*00
Suits you know and love ... tailored
to perfection in the finest of all fab-
rics ...worsteds, gabardines, flannels,
and wool checks. Broken sizes re-
maining to choose yqur, winter and
spring suits from. Timely values for
thrifty shoppers. Juniors and misses
sizes in brown, black, toast, wine,
beige, blue or green.
sUns-Third Floor

BUSINESS and
SECRETARIAL TRAINING
ACCOUNTING - TYPING
SHORTHAND - STENOTYPY
BUSINESS MACHINES
Single Subjects or Complete Courses
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
Approved. fQr Veterans William at State

,t

.- z 9F

Riding Horses For Hire
TRY OUR INDOOR
RIDING RING
Instructions Available
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Golfside Stables
GENE BLAND, Mgr.
.r- "'"3250 E. Huron River Dr. Ph. 7772

I

i

i

Famous Personage,

S. CLAUS,

says,

II

111

AT
RAN

THE COLLEGE SHOP
DIMACHER SUITS}r
rmerly 50.00 39.0
CHOICE Of fine 100% wool

Aef
i.

w
r
,' rrr s
r ,,
.v: i..
i. ' ',
'jig.. . "4. s'" $
'jYj'
':': iJ j : r
.s: ::::::: > r
:<}; v
>:. .
s ... .._ rf<.

I
,e

/ /:Ic

. !=-
r.
r l .
:::: .
Y .v.t ;
J r.,ve4

Fo

_A,

LOOK YOUR
PRETT I EST

XMAS GIFTS
See our large Selection o f
Beautiful Gifts, Plain or
Crested with U. of M. Seal
or Fraternity and Sorority

YOUR

"When traveling, I always carry

during th

ilannel or gabardine in suits you rec-
ognize as tops in value and quality.
Tailored by master craftsmen in
Z r f XT

e gay

*-.C-Lt

11 ?EVDUUTEvy N'E3S9 hENE" N? u I L99 111I

11111

1111

1111

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan