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December 06, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIlY

TUESDAY,

_TUESDAY . .:.. ..,._..,, ,z

TEXTBOOKS TO LEND:
'U' Library Aids Students

' By WALTER VOGTMANN
Perhaps little known, yet one of
the University's greatest services
to students in financial need is the
textbook leanding library.
' Since its founding in 1937
through student gifts and the fi-
nancial help of alumni, the library
ias provided textbooks for hun-
dreds of needy students-students
who otherwise could not have con-
iinued their study at the Univer-
pity.
* * *
HOUSED IN Angell Hall Study
Hall, the library's textbook lend-
ing services are available to any
University student whose restrict-
ed financial status shows evidences
of genuine need for the services.
The genuine need of a student
is determined by either a dean,
concentration adviser, academic
counselor or appropriate official
of his college, who may recom-
mend the student for the library
Penefits.
Books are charged to students
for one semester with the privilege
of renewing the loan for another
semester, provided the. books have
not been carelessly handled.
DURING THE PAST 12 years of
its operation one of the library's
problems has been to keep its
textbook collection up to date to
meet with changing text require-
ments of courses.
It has done this in part by
selling those textbooks which
have become obsolete, using the
proceeds to purchase books in
current use.
But its chief problem has been
in meeting the students' require-
ments for various courses in the
University.
* * * .
THE 1,873 VOLUMES in the li-
brary at present cover only a frac-
tion of the course textbooks cur-
rently being used in the University,
and consequently it. frequently
fails to fulfill student requests.
However, it has tried to ac-

* * * *

-Daily--Wally Barth
TEXTBOOK LENDING LIBRARY-Lillian Rickel, University li-
brarian, takes inventory of the 1873 volumes in the Textbook
Lending Library. The library, founded in 1937, on the gifts of
students and alumni, aids needy students with books.
* * * *

quire the texts for the more pop-
ular courses Sometimes it makes
,special purcases to supply spe-
cific' texts which are urgently
needed. But because of a small
fund, such practices are neces-
necessarily limited.
And now with the enrollment of
veterans attending the University
on the GI Bill rapidly declining,
the library anticipates an evenj
greater demand for its facilities.

SINCE ITS founding the library
has mainly relied on the book con-
tribution it has received from stu-
dents and faculty members.
Also, several alumni helped by
the library in the past have sent
in money helping the library col-
lection.
The library was patterned after
the Yale University textbook lend-
ing library, which has a collection
of about 60,000 volumes.

NSA To Hold
Conference
Next Spring
(Continued from Page 1)
The 1950 summer travel pro-
grams were announced by Er-
skine Childers, NSA interna-
tional vice president. Childers
attended the meeting to help
plan the regianal international
program.
Childers will attend the London
^onference of Western national
tudents union Dec. 21-22, which
wlil consider tactical means for
he reform of the Communist-
lominated International Union of
3tudents. IUS now has represen-
tatives of approximately 54 na-
tional student groups.
IN AN KEYNOTE address to the
conference, Childers said that NSA
was built on two basic convepts-
meeting the material and educa-
tional needs of students.
Materially, NSA is providing
students with programs such as
the Purchase Card System and
foreign travel, exchange and re-
lief programs, Childers said.
Educationally, the Association is
concerned with the development
of of student government, aca-
demic freedom, the Student Bill of
Rights, and improvement of col-
lege curricula.
HE EMPHASIZED that NSA
has been continually growing, and
has achieved these basic accom-
plishments:
1. Expanding membership (to
325 member schools in the United
States in three years) and the con-
solidation of NSA programs.
2. National recognition as the
voice of the student body of the
nation by government and educa-
tional leaders.
He pointed out this recognition
has been shown by NSA's only all-
student seat on the U.S. Commis-
sion for UNESCO, and invitations
by the National Education Associ-
ation, the American Association of
Colleges, and other national edu-
cational and civic groups to par-
ticipate in their activities.
Campus
Calendar
CED-Committee to End Disj
crimination will hold special meet-
ing called by executive board at
5:00 p.m. Union.
ADA-August Schole, presidentl
of the state CIO will speak on la-
bor's role in politics before the
Americans for Democratic Action
at 8:00 p.m. today, Kellogg audi-
torium. Coffee hour and informal
talk at 4:15 in the Union.
Stanley Quartet-last concert at
8:30 p.m. tonight in Rackham L%-
ture Hall.
Modern English Literature -
Constance Dyson, principal of
Hillcroft College, England, will
lecture at 4:15 today in Architec-
ture, Auditorium. Evening lecture}
on "Adult Education in Great
Britain" at 8:00 p.m. Architecture
Auditorium.
TUXEDO
RENTALS
Regulars - Longs - Shorts
We carry a complete line
of accessories

Shirts - Hose - Ties - Hdkf.
Studs - Links - Suspenders
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309 So. Main St. Ph. 2-2015

-Daily---Wally Barth
"HOME FOR THE FRIENDLY"-Ralph Guy, center, looks be-
wildered as he is beset by four over-friendly people, left to right,
Art Nevins, Jackqueline Heyman, Mary Ann Kulas and Herb Rov-
ner. The farce is ibnclud d in the bill of four one-avt plays to be
presented at 8 ip.m. tonight in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
SpweedGrop To G iVe
One-Act Play ill Today

By BOB SOLT
Students attempting to buy pen-
icillin without a doctor's prescrip-
tion for treatment of colds or
strep throat will encounter firm
resistance from Ann Arbor's phar-
macists, a recent Daily survey
showed.
Most of the local druggists, who
are expecting an increase in the
number of students asking for
penicillin during the coming win-
ter months, will require a written
slip from a physician before selling
the drug.
* * *
OF 12 DRUG STORES on the
campus asked to sell penicillin
without a prescription, 11 would
not dispense the drug unless med-
ical authorization could be fur-
nished.
Their position was indicated
by one druggist who pointed to
the caution printed on the label
of a penicillin container which
read, "To be dispensed only on
or by presription of a physician."
Only one of the local drug stores
visited sold a lozenged from of
penicillin without prescription.
"THE USE of penicillin and
similar drugs in few and small
doses may not by itself be dan-
gerous," one University pharmacist
said.
"But too frequent use of these
drugs for minor ailments could
make the human organism im-
mune to them at a time when
the drug's powers are needed,
most."
Several pharmacists opposed
selling penicillin without a doctor's
prescription because of uncertain-
ty as to how the drug may react.
They said that intramuscular
injections administered by phy-
sicians kill only part of the
germs.
Self treatment, administered ex-
ternally is sometimes ineffective

and often harmful in treating a
cold, they agreed.
PHARMACISTS also stated that
intermittent use of penicillin and
other drugs on the advice of a
physician is just as effective as
trying to combat an ailment with
large, sudden doses.
Explaining the legal aspects in-
volved Chief Pharmacist Arthur J.
Gibson of the Health Service said
that "the Federal Food and Drugs
Bureau has laid down no specific
and clear-cut law forbidding the
sale of certain types of penicillin."
Dr. Gibson emphasized that
control over the sale of penicil-
lin is an "ethical and profession-
al responsibility of pharma-
Icists."
As for the caution printed on
the penicillin container, Dr. Gib-
son said it is placed there by the
manufacturer of the drug to pro-
tect himself from legal suit..
But the concensus of opinion
among pharmacists was that stu-
dents should be. hesitant to buyl
and use a drug whose effects in
some cases are not certain to even
well -trained bacteriologists.

Meet to Plan
Arts Magazine
An organizational meeting for
a proposed quarterly magazine of
the arts will be held by Inter-Arts
Union at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in
the League.
The magazine, which will be
an all-student publication, is part
of IAU's program to stimulate and
coordinate the activities of, the
various art groups on campus.
.. .. . . . ... . 1.. . .

Drugists Tighten Grip On
Penicillin As Colds Threaten

!o'

4

Phi Eta Sigma Announces
List of Eligible Freshmen

A bill of four one-act plays will
be presented by the speech de-
partment at 8 p.m. today in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets will be on sale from 10
a.m. to 8 p.m. in the Mendel-
ssohn Theatre box office.
* * *
THE BILL IS the first of the
two series of one-acts directed and
staged each semester by students
in the advanced courses in the
theatre.
Ted Heusel, Grad., will direct
Eugene O'Neill's "Where the
Cross Is Made." Appearing in
the tragedy will be Max Kelly,
David Marshall, Harriet Stober
and James Eatmon.
"The Home for the Friendly"
Cleveland Bus
Schedule Set
Special buses to Cleveland for
students from that area returning
home for Christmas vacations,
have been arranged by the Cleve-
land Club, Mary Lubeck, president,
said yesetrday.
The two busses will leave Fri-
day, Dec. 16, one in the middle af-
ternoon and one in late afternoon,
according to the schdeule announ-
ced by Lubeck.
Busses will also be available for
the return trip on Jan. 2.
Reservations will be available
only at the meeting of the Cleve-
land Club, 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in
the League, Lubeck said.

will be directed by Lloyd Kaiser,
'50. The cast includes Ralph Buy,
Mary Ann Kulas, Arthur Nevins,
Jacqueline Heyman, Herb Robner,
John Mills and Doris Clark.
DIRECTING "The Singer" by
Padraic Pearse will be Arthur
Flemings, Grad. Taking roles in
the play will be Albert Johnson,
Donald Schmidt, Beverly Ketcik,
Rollene Jackson, Jack Beauchamp,
William Rohring and Jack Hueb-,
ler.
William Taylor- will direct "She
Was No Lady" by St. John G. Er-
vine. Duane Gotschall, Joyce At-
chison, Richard Teneau and Nen-
iie Quirk will appear in the cast.

4

All Wool

MICHIGAN BLANKETS

Names of 23 men eligible for Phi
Eta Sigma, n national freshman
honor society for men, have been
announced by Donald F. Nelson,
president of the group.
Eligibility for the society is based
on achievement of a 3.5 average,
or better, for the first semester or
an overall 3.5 average, or better,
for the entire freshman year.

Among the potential members
are Joel J. Baron, Hallard W.
Beard, Alfred Berend, Robert R.
Bockemuehl, Arthur T. Bublitz,
Sanford B. Cain, Gerald M. Dop-
pelt, Frederick F. Fishbach, Ross
N. Friedman, Alvin Green, James
A. Hamburg and Barry Henning.
Others include William T. Hicks,
Michael P. Hlady, Zander Hollan-
d'er, Merton S. Krause, Reginald P.
Pugh, Robert O. Rosenman, Stan-
ley S. Schwartz, Thomas M.
Straus, Bruce E. Thal, Myron Vin-
ocuo and George B. Waters.
Nelson urged all eligible fresh-

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Galens Hit GoalI

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OPTICAL SERVICE
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CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade Ph. 2-9116

Galens grossed
the sale of tags
Christmas drive,
Bill Newlander,
chairman.

$5382.60 from
in its recent
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contact him im-
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when packed in a drawer.
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Concert Ticket
Sale At Union
Tickets are still available at the
Union for this season's last per-
formance of the Detroit Little
Symphony 8:30 p.m. tomorrow at
the Detroit Art Institute Auditor-
ium, in which Paul Doktor, of the
music school, will appear as guest
solo violinist.
Doktor will play the "Sonata
Da Camera" by Locatelli.
Other works to be played in the
concert are Haydn's Symphony
No. 88 in G. Major, "Divertisse-
ment" by Ibert, and a work dedi-
cated to the Little, Symphony-
"Concerto for Small Orchestra"
by Prof. Bernhard Heiden, of the
University of Indiana's music
school

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INTRODUGTORY SALE
ON ENTIRE STOCK
NATIONALLY
ADVERTISED

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