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December 04, 1949 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-04

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PAGx FoM7TEEN

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1949

4,000Can See
Renovated Rink Features-
Better Lighting, Heating
r i a r-.

WolverineHockey Opener Saturday

.t

* *

4 :k :

WIDE OPEN SEASON:
'M' Cage Practice Hints at Faster Play

By BOB SANDELL
Michigan's hockey fans will get
their first look at a vastly improv-
ed ice rink this week when the
Wolverine puckmen open their
winter campaign against McMas-
ter University Saturday night.
Although beset by numerous
difficulties since the work began
the first of September, workmen
are expected to have the "new"
coliseum Just about completed by
the time the weekend rolls around.
THE LOYAL FOLLOWER of
the increasingly popular winter
sport will be particularly cheered
by two features of the new ice
Season tickets for the Wol-
verine hockey games are being
sold this year for the first time.
The sixteen home game card
will sell for $16, while single
game tickets are $2 for reserved
and $1.50 for general admission.
Student prices remain at $.60.
skating layout-the seating capa-
city has been nearly quadrupled
and it will be HEATED.
No longer will he (the aver-
age fan) have to trudge down to
the rink at least two hours or
more before game time laden
down with blankets, coats, ex-
tri socks and anything else that
will prevent him from freezing
a toe or nearly shivering to
deith.
Whereas about 1,100 people used
to jam the coliseum in former
years, with over a hundred of
these standing or practically hang-,
ing from the rafters, at least 4,000c

will now be able to comfortably
enjoy some of the finest college
hockey in the land.
* * *
FROM THE player's standpoint
probably the new lighting system
will appeal most along with a
brand new roof that, it is hoped,
will keep the patrons dry during
the progress of the contest.
The players will also benefit
in another way, for bigger and
better dressing rooms are being
built right under the new steel
frame stands that fill up most
of the space created by the ex-
pansion.
There were a couple of unfor-
seen difficulties that the builders
ran into during the construction,
the main one being a carpenter's
strike that threatened to halt the
whole proceedings.
AFTER THREE WEEKS of lay-
off the "hammer and saw" ex-
perts finally agreed to return to
work and just in time to begin the
roof.
Workmen ran into soft ground
when excavating on the north
side of the building and this de-
layed progress until they could
dig a little deeper to a more
firm foundation.
It is thought that the soft earth
was caused by the swimming pool
that was situated in the area near-
ly 30 years ago.
But the major share of the prob-
lems have been overcome and Wol-
verine hockey fanatics are finally
close to having a veritable "ice
palace" in comparison to the leaky
old barn that they have had to
contend with for so many seasons.

-Daily-Barney Laschever
IT'S HEATED-Workmen put finishing touches on the leak-proof roof of the expanded Michigan
Coliseum.

By BILL BRENTON
Michigan's famed controlled-
ball offense may roll downhill this
season.
From all practice indications
Coach Ernie McCoy's quintet may
speed up the tempo of play, es-
pecially when a fast break oppor-
tunity presents itself.
* * *
WITH GUARDS like Pete Elli-
ott and Bob Harrison holding
forth the last four years, the Wol-
verines depended on set plays and
holding the ball for scores. This
policy, introduced by Ozzie Cowles,
led to the Western Conference
championship in the 1947-48 sea-
son.
This year the Maize and Blue
have one of the fastest quintets
of recent years. Captain Mack
Suprunowicz and Jim Skala will
provide the McCoymen with a
pair of fast, clever forwards sec-
ond to none. Suprunowicz ' scor-
ing and clever passing are leg-
endary, while Yost Field house
fans may see a new shooting
star in Skala.
Chuck Murray and Bill Doyle at
guards are by no means slow. And
Hal "Lefty" Morrill, although
standing 6 feet 4 inches, can drive
in with the best of them. Murray
especially is impressive with his
whirling underhand shots.
DEFENSE WILL NOT be lack-
ing either, with a team averaging
6 ft., 2 in. for the probable first
five.- Besides, such backboard
cleaners as Morrill, big Leo Van-

derkuy and Don McIntosh are on
hand.
Even if the fast break fails,
it looks as if the Michiganders
will modify the old wait-for-an-
opening style. The present set
offense works around 6 ft., 5 in.
Vanderkuy's either-handed hook
shots with the fast forwards
moving for opportunities.
SPORTS
PANDRO S. BERMAN
Night Editor
Another novelty, if not an in-
novation, may be a zone defense
if practice is any indication. Wol-
verine clubs have used the zone at
times in the past, but the present
squad was apparently slated for
the man-to-man.
* * *
SPEAKING OF DEFENSE, Mc-

Coy believes Michigan must star
defensively to go anywhere. From
the shooting of Supruniowicz,
Morrill, Skala and Vanderkuy,
however, its hard to tell.
Morrill especially has been
deadly with an ala Harrison
one-handed push shot.
The Wolverines face their an-
nually tough schedule in the Con-
ference made all the harder by
small midwest basketball powers
like Butler and Toledo University.
Toledo reportedly boasts a 6 ft.,
9 in. center. But Michigan has a
second semester ace-in-the-hole
too in 6 ft., 8 in. Bob Williams, a
transfer from Vanderbilt.
THE HEIGHT is good, the de-
fense is good and if the offense
comes through-who knows?
DO YOU KNOW ... that Harry
Wismer, widely known football an-
nouncer and sports director for the
American Broadcasting Company,
was a top-notch football prospect
at Michigan State before an in-
jury cut short his playing career
as a freshman?

}S

i

I,1 I

Dso BLE
by pres holmes, sports CO-editor

Seven Come Ten
Michigan's cagers are title-
hungry-so hungry that they're
going after two conference
championships this season. .
The Wolverines will be point-
ing for a claim to superiority in
the Big Seven Conference when
they take part in the league's
Christmas basketball tourney
Dec. 27-30 at Kansas City, Mo.
Because eight teams are needed
to balance the play-off pair-
ings, theBig Seven each year
invites one team to participate
as "guest".

*

Christmas Gift Suggestions
for HIM
ELECTRIC RAZORS
RONSON LIGHTERS
BILL FOLDS
TOBACCO POUCHES
PIPES
FOUNTAIN PENS
PENCILS
PIPE RACKS

'I

A T THE 29th annual University of Michigan Football Bust last Wed-
nesday night one of the men in the background, one of the un-
heralded alumni who is steeped in the Michigan tradition, who has
personified Michigan in his own expressive way for over 40 years, was
J. Fred Lawton.
He graduated from the University in 1911 but while he was still
an undergrad he created something which established him as "Michi-
gan." He collaborated with Louis Elbel to write "Varsity," which has
since become a standby at any rally or football game.
* * * *
TO BENNIE OOSTERBAAN (with sympathy)
THE LAST WEEK in October, back in nineteen forty-six
The Illini beat Michigan, and put them in a fix
It happened in Ann Arbor-the score was 13-9
Next morning, critics screamed that Mich'gan's star had ceased to
shine
Reporters got their crying towels and started in to cry
And some "synthetic" graduates bid Michigan goodbye
So,-Michigan, in great disgrace, for having lost a game
Won 25 games in a row, and brought back football fame!
Oh, how the critics cheered 'em then, extolled 'em to the skies
Our great "synthetic" graduates wiped teardrops from their eyes
We won all games in '47-how brave our warriors fought
Met USC in the Rose Bowl, beat 'em 49 to naught
Then, hip hooray for '48-a long resounding cheer
Another National Championship, with Ben "Coach of the Year"
Next came the team of '49, the world pronounced them great
Some "boo's" when we won 7 to 3, and got by Michigan State,
But when our boys played Stanford, they really did arrive
They won, and ran our victory string way up to twenty-five!
The papers raved and raved and said, "Old Mich'gan's goin' to
town" N
Hurray for Bennie Oosterbaan, the Coach of GREAT RENOWN!"
They photographed him everyday, they wrote words nice and kind
He was the Nation's WONDER COACH, the world's great MAS-
TER MIND!
With compliments and tributes grand they made their presses hum
Now, who would guess, next Saturday, the guy would be a BUM?
The Army beat us, how they yelled, how second guessers guessed!
All folks who hated Michigan got insults off their chest
The critics cried, "FIRE OOSTERBAAN!"-then gave the team
the "razz"
You'd think our Wolverines had all escaped from Alcatraz
"Synthetic" graduates all got as tough as they could get
But wailers at the wailing wall had not seen nothin' yet.
Northwestern beat us by one point-then knockers got up steam
And hollored to High Heaven, "LET CRISLER COACH THE
TEAM!"
But, Saturday, when the Gophers came to "cinch" the great Rose
Bowl,
The Mich'gan "corpse" arose and drove the Gopher down his hole.
So, now, again, Ben Oosterbaan is greatest of all men
He's cherred by countless thousands-he's a Master Mind again
"Synthetic" graduates are standing on their chairs to cheer
"WE'RE ALL BEHINDiYOU BENNIE"nthey are shouting in his ear
But, Bennie smiles a knowing smile, and says, "I know you are,
You guys are all behind me-the question is, HOW FAR?"
Says Bennie, "Your applause is swell, but gosh, what will you do,
If Michigan should lose a game in nineteen fifty-two?"
-Copyright--J. Fred Lawton
DO YOU KNOW . . . . that
the Chicago Bears of the National1
Football League led in kickoff re-j
* w tturns in 1948, with 29 brought
back for 751 yards, an average of
about 25.9 yards each?a

Gime H im Luxurious
Full-cut for comfortable sleeping and lounging,
tailored for durability. Choose from many
solid colors and color combinations. Take
your pick of lightweight cotton, sleek rayon,
and snug flannel fabrics. Prices begin at $3.95.
521 E. Liberty Michigan Theatre Bldg.

I'
508 E. WILLIAM
Open Mondays till 9 P.M.
on Dec. 5, 12 and 19,
and on Wed., Dec. 21
SSpin favorite
harmonies
with gifts of
LONG-PLAYING
For economy, tonal beauty, uninterrupted
listening -30 to 50 minutes of music
per L-P Record (10",12")
CAROLS AND THE CLASSICS
Q Christmas Carols. Mount Holyoke College Glee Club and Celebrity
Quartet. 12" record. ML 4231.........................$4.85
Q Christmas Carol (Dickens). Basil Rathbone with supporting cast. PLUS
(~ Christmas Carols. Lyn Murray Singers. 12" record. ML 4081.. $4.85
E The Messiah (Handel). Isobel Baillie, soprano; and others. Hudders.
field Choral Society, Liverpool Philharmonic Orch. Sir. Malcolm
Sargent, cond. Three 12" records. SL 151................$14.55
i Symphony No. 5 in E Minor (Tschaikowsky). Artur Rodzinski conduc-
ting Cleveland Orch. 12" record. ML 4052...,...........$4.85
Q Concerto in A Minor for Piano and Orch. (Schumann). Rudolf Srkin,
piano. Ormandy cond. Philadelphia Orch. 12" record. ML 4041 $4.85
Q La Traviata (Verdi). Soloists with Chorus and Orchestra of the Opera
House of Rome. Vincenzo Bellezza, conducting. Complete on three
12" records. 51 103...............................$14.53
L Rhumpy The Rhino. Karl Weber, narrator. Kankie and the Concertin.
David Allen, narrator. 10" record. JL 8004..............$2.85
Fl Little Black Sambo. Don Lyon with Orch. Little Red Riding Hood.
David Allyn, narrator. 10" record. JL 8006 ..............$2.85
Q Nursery Songs, Gene Kelly, with vocal quartet and orchestra. 10"
record. JL 8001...................................$2.85
f Many Moons. John Lansing, narrator. The Eager Piano. John Larkin,
narrator. Supporting cast, orch. 10" record. JL 8002........$2.85
10" AND 12" POPULAR HITS
Q Les Brown Dance Parade. 10" record. CL 6060..........$2.85
Q Benny Goodman Dance Parade. 10" record. CL 6048.......$2.85
/' u Reminiscingwith Dinah Shore. With Orch.10" record. CL 6069, $2.85
Q Buddy Clark Encores. With Orch. 10" record. CL 6084.......$2.85
Q Kiss Me, Kate (Cole Porter). With Alfred Drake, Patricia Morrison,
Original Broadway Cast. 12" record. ML 4140...........$4.85
j Miss Liberdy. (Irving Berlin). Eddie Albert, Allyn MctLerie, Mary
McCarty, Original Broadway Cast. 12" record. ML 4220....$4.85
LIQSouth Pacific. (Rodgers, Hammerstein). Mary Martin, Ezio Pinza,
Original Broadway Cast. 12" record. ML 4180............$4.85
MAIL AND PHONE ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY
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icroverter (aright)added to your FOR $ 0 9 5
V phonograph, takes no extra space,
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\

*

SEA FORTH, YARDLEY AND
OLD SPICE GIFT SETS

CIGARS - CIGARETTES - TOBACCOS
SWIFT'S DRUG STORE
340 South State Street

FOLLETT'S ARE LOAD

goou carroon ana numor DooKs
this year ... THE PERFECT GIFT
for your Room-mate
HERE ARE A FEW FROM OUR LARGE SELECTION:
HOME SWEET ZOO - Barnes - $1.00
WE WENT THATAWAY - H. Allen Smith - $2.75
PLEASE PASS THE HOSTESS - Darrow - $2.75
AND ON THE EIGHTH DAY - Abner Dean - $2.95
SIZZLING PLATTER - Peter Arno - $2.95
LISTEN TO THE MOCKING BIRD - Perelman - $2.95
THE ART OF LIVING - Steinberg - $3.50
WOMEN ARE HERE TO STAY - Rogers - $5.00

- -

---r

*SMAIR

N AN

He is rushing to SLATER'S to fill his
L _ _! -I - -- -- i l -- 0 _ UI - I - re

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