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December 04, 1949 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-04

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE NMN

~U141AY, ~EGEI~tR4, 199 TH .ICGANDAIL
__ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

Xmas Trees'
Big Business
For Dealers
City Sellers Look
For Record Year
By DON KO'UTE
Little do Christmas tree buyers
ever realize-or care-that their
observance of a long-standing
holiday tradition means an annual
$2,000,000 fortune for American
farmers and foresters.
To John Q. Public the Christmas
tree is a must at any price. An
empty living room corner on Dec.
25 is like bread without butter.
IN ANN ARBOR, dealers are
digging in for what appears to be
a record season, a check of local
tree merchants has indicated.
The bulk of sprice and balsam
shipments, some of which have
already been received here, are
due to arrive by Friday or Sat-
urday.
Most of the dealers contacted
have ordered their trees from east-
ern or Rocky Mountain firms. Not
one-sixth of merchants queried are
depending on state supplies, the
survey found.
* * *
APPARENT CAUSE is an Asso-
ciated Press report that down-
state Michigan will get only half
last year's total tree supply from
northern Michigan.
An Ann St. grocery manager
explained he was advised by a
Pittsburgh wholesaler last July
to purchase 15 to 20 per cent
more evergreens this season
than he did in 1948.
"I followed his suggestion and
ordered eight dozen instead of my
usual six," he explained and added
that the price should be the "same
or less" than last Christmas.
OTHER ANN ABOR merchants
were discovered following his ex-
ample, in anticipation of a bumper
season. More than half the dealers
surveyed have upped their 1948
spruce and balsam orders by two
to three dozens.
Throughout the United States,
grocery stores, gardening cen-
ters and independent merchants
are beginning to stock all avail-
able space with the more than
12,000,000 boughed beauties ob-
tained from the nation's four
corners.
The stately spruces, firs and bal-
sa, have come a long way since
devout Grecian worshippers, just
before 1,000 A.D., initiated the cus-
tom by honoring sacred trees as
the wood of Christ's cross.
Today's typical last - minute
opper, eager to please his brood
with a ceiling-high evergreen,
hasn't half the worries of a 17th
century Pilgrim father.

HISTORY MAKING?
Teacher Gains 'Fame';
Names Lake for Himself

By DAVIS CRIPPEN
If you want your name immor-
talized (after a fashion), you
should go not west, but north,
James Woodruff of the geography
department advises.
It's up in the far northern re-
gions of Canada that Woodruff
has made his mark-he has a lake
named after him. He named it
himself.
* * *
WOODRUFF, an AAF first lieu-
tenant, spent about a year in
1944-45 flying C-37's to supply
outlying weather stations in north-
eastern Canada.
One of his most frequently
traveled routes was between
Goose Bay and Fort Chime.
"The Army Airways Communi-
cations System always wanted
to know, or wanted to at least
appear as if they knew, where
I was when I was flying between
these bases."
This was hard to tell, Woodruff
explained, because the region
hadn't been explored thoroughly
enough for mapping.
* * * -
HE PICKED out the lake as a
check point. It appealed to him
mainly because it had the shape
of a doughnut being about ten
miles across with a mile wide
round island set squarely in the
middle.
"Everything was fine then,"
Woodruff continued. "I'd radio
in that I was such and such a
distance from Lake Woodruff
and that was that.
"They couldn't have known
where I was, because even I didn't
know exactly. But they had a
position. That was enough."
The former pilot isn't so sure

that Lake Woodruff will keep
that name in the future. He never
turned the lake's position or its
name into the Army for confirma-
tion.
THE REGION will ultimately be
mapped, he feels ,and when that
happens his lake will probably be
stuck with some long Eskimo
name, like many of the other fea-
tures of the region.
"So don't look on the map for
the lake," Woodruff warned,
"because it isn't there."
As for returning, Woodruff said
that he would like to go back
some day, perhaps stay there and
write his doctor's dissertation on
the area.
BUT THIS project is on the
doubtful list because of, first, the
lake's inaccessibility and, second,
the expense involved in getting
there.
With an eye to killing both these
birds with one stone, Woodruff
asked, "You don't happen to know
of anyone who wants to finance
an expedition, do you?"

Santa Soared
To Fame as
Agent of Love
Gave Lonely Maidens
Dowry forWedding
Millions of youngsters, the world
round, will be waiting for Santa
Claus this Christmas Eve as a
bearer of gifts, yet oddly enough,
the merry old fellow first became
famous as an agent of love.
In Asia Minor, some 1600 years
ago, there lived a nobleman with
three daughters of marriage age
and no money for a dowry.
* * *
DAN CUPID, or rather St. Nick
came to the rescue, mysteriously
tossing a bag of gold through the
window of the noble household.
There was enough money to bag
a husband for the oldest daughter.
He repeated the process later for
the two younger daughters.
In a few centuries, his legend
had entered Europe and the
name St. Nick became synono-
mous with anonymous philan-
thropy.
People gave gifts on the anni-
versary of his death and gradual-
ly his name was affectionately
changed in some countries to the
Santa Claus and Kris Kringle of
today.

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Shop Monday Night. Open until 9.

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