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December 01, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIJ1Y1SDAT, DZGEMBER 1, 190-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

9

...A ...E.. ....E....E N.

SCIENTIFIC HONEYMOON:
Anthropologists End 20-Month Hunt

* * *

* * *

* * *

By DOLORES LASCHEVER
Two young scientists who spent
their honeymoon unearthing evi-
dence of ancient man in the Aleu-
tian Islands are expected to re-
turn to the University any day.
Theodore P. Bank, Jr., botanical
anthropolgist who was director of
the Michigan Aleutian Expedition,
and his wife Eleanor have just
enmnletedl a 20 month expedition
sponsored by the Office of Naval
icesearch
* * *
BANK IS NOW convinced that
the first humans did not come tc
North America via the Aleutian
Islands.
"Grayer heads than mine will
add up the evidence," the 26
year old scientist reported to the
Navy, "but I think our material,
when coupled with all that col-
lected earlier, will show pretty
conclusively that the Aleutians
never were man's stepping stones
from Asia to North America.
"Instead, it seems more likely
that the Asian migration came
across Bering Strait, drifted dow
the coast and part of it moved
eastward along the Aleutians."
r*
BANK'S ATTRACTIVE 21 year
old wife was more than a spectator
on the journey-she accompanied
the research group as acting eth-
nologist.
The couple taught school in
the tiny Aleut village of Atka
during the winter and spent the
summer doing their scientific
work.
Accompanying the expeditions
part of the time was Prof. Albert
C. Spaulding, of the anthropology
department, who is associate cura-
tor of archaeology in the Museum
of Archaeology.
ACCORDING TO Dr. Spaulding,
arrangements were made for his
archaeological work in the North
Pacific island chain before he went
up to complete it.
Bank said the purpose of the
expedition was threefold:
1) To make a substantial col-
lection of Aleutian plants which
had been neglected by American
science;
2) To learn all possible informa-
tion concerning Aleutian people
through thorough excavation at
Students Given
Scholarships
Five scholarships, awarded by
the National Association of Furni-
ture Manufacturer, have been
granted to University students in
the School of Forestry and Con-
servation.
Stipends valued at $750 have
been given to Norman C. Franz,
Joseph W. Streidl, Roland Howell,
Lee K. Morse, and Carl Forslund.
OPTICAL SERVICE
for the Campus Area
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade Ph. 2-9116

"WHERE WE WERE"-Ted Ban
U.S. Naval Reserve, where they
the Aleutian Islands. Bank dire
was sponsored by the Office of N
* * *
ancient village sites and study of
contemporary native villages;
3) To study the nature, names
and uses of plants and animals-
especially such resources as were
used for foods, medicines and poi-1
sons.
THE INFORMATION obtained
was to be made available to Naval
and military sources, Bank said,
adding:
"Archaeological materials will
be made available to the Univer-
sity of Michigan museum and to
the national museum."
By flying over the entire Aleu-
tian chain, Bank and his wife, ac-
companied by a Navy research
team, discovered at least 15 an-
cient village sites, detecting them,

k and his wife Eleanor point out to Lt. Commander D. S. Stampley,
spent the past 20 months unearthing evidence of ancient man in
ected a University anthropological and botanical expedition which
Naval Research.

* * *
from the air by the markedly dif-
ferent vegetation patterns and
colors.
Indicating that early man mov-
ed from the Alaska mainland to
the Aleutians, Bank said, is the
fact that ancient village sites now
being unearthed are buried much
deeper on the Eastern end of the
chain than on the western islands.
He explained this would indicate
they were covered by succeeding
villages before the western groups
were.
* * *
A MAJOR discovery of the ex-
pedition was an ancient wooden
mask typical of Southeastern Alas-
ka Indians but never reported be-
fore in the Aleutians. Bank un-
earthed it while exploring a cave

* *k *
on Kagamil in the Island of Four
Mountains group.
"It at least shows some con-
nection between the Aleutians
and mainland people," Banks
pointed out, "but we'll have to
wait until we find more of them
to be positive of its place in his-
tory."
Banks became interested in the
potentialities of the Aleutian ex-
pedition when he served in thef
Aleutians as a Naval reservist dur-
ing the recent war.
Before their return to the Uni-
iersity, the Banks will deliver a
;eries of lectures at western edu-
cational institutions and then
make an official report to the Of-
fice of Naval Research in Wash-
ington, D.C.

Romeo and
Juliet' Set
To Play Here
T 11
"Romeo and Juliet" will be giv-
en its first campus performance in
more than 20 years when the Uni-
versity of Michigan Theatre Guild
presents the Shakespearian trag-
edy at 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
in Pattengill Auditorium.
The principal roles will be played
by Eleanor Littlefield, '50, and Ed-
mund Johnston, 'Grad, who an-
nounced their engagement lift
month.
* * *
BECAUSE the play is being pre-
sented in its entirety, 23 scene
changes are necessary, according
to Mark Harris, '50, producer.
"We have decided to present
the drama in full length because
for most people the romance in
cut form seems absurd," Harris
said.
Ted Miller, '51, who designed the
sets explained that the scene
changes have been accomplished
by utilizing a semi-flat technique,
instead of attempting to complete-
ly surround the stage with various
settings.
"However, through careful light-
ing, none of the effect has been
lost," he declared.
MILLER, although he has had
no previous experience, had a
teacher' who grounded him thor-
oughly in the theatrical art.
"My grandmother, an artist
who went blind in her later life,
spent a great deal of time ex-
plaining the functions of art in
the theatre to me," he ex-
plained.
Miller, who was recruited from
the cast in which he plays Paris,
and James Harris, '50, are the
stage managers for the play.
THE PRODUCTION will be
highlighted by recorded music for
the Shakespearian prologues and
dances directed by Prof. Juana de
Laban of the physical education;
department.
Tickets for both performances
are on sale in the lobby of the Ad-
ministration Building.
Call Engineers
To HeadJobs
Engineering seniors are needed
to fill positions on senior class
zo3mmittees.
Positions are open on the cap
and gown, commencement an-
nouncements, publicity, and spe-
cial events committees according
to Bill Upthegrove, '50E, president
of the senior class of the Engineer-
ing College.
All interested students should
turn in their names and commit-
tee preferences to the section of-
fice in West Engineering Bldg.,
Upthegrove said. The deadlne is
Friday.
NO! NO TUX
for
PAUL BUNY1
WEAR JEANS -
Dec. 3 Tickets atf

* * *

Newspapers should welcome
outside criticism, Nathaniel
Howard, editor of the Cleveland
NTews, told a journalism audience
yesterday.
"Although some of it is unjust
a cessation of criticism would
nean only one of two things,"
Howard said, "either the public
has lost interest or, worse yet,
hey have stopped reading news-
papers altogether."
* * *
ACCORDING to Howard, two
things may incite attacks on the
press.
The first is its accessability.
"The newspaperis always in the
public eye, which makes it an
easy and vulnerable target," he
said.
"The other," Howard continued,
"is its size. The public has an
underlying fear of the mass-
produced printed word, which is
the dynamic power of a news-
paper."
THE RELIABILITY of a paper's
news facts is one of the first things
brought to question, Howard
stated.
"In this problem the time ele-
ment is always against a news-
man, because there has always
been a public appetite wanting
news as fast as it can be ob-
tained," he declared.
Many people claim that a news-
paper overemphasizes some ar-
ticles, underemphasizes or slants
others, Howard asserted.
* * *
"THESE persons, should remem-

NATHANIEL HOWARD
ber that editors, after all, are
only human. I have yet to find
two people who view one set of
facts with the same importance."'
Other criticisers say that
newspapers are too faithful a
servant of private enterprise,
Howard observed.
"While it can't be denied that
this argument is, necessarily true
to some extent, I have found that
in most circumstances the papers,
which are neither too hostile to
private business nor too subser-
vient, are the most successful," he
said.

criticism of Newspapers Worthwhile
States Howard of Cleveland News

THE POWER and control which
the press exercises over public
thought, is no great threat to any
individual's freedom, he pointed
out.
"The progress which the press
has made in the last 50 years has
been prodigious: It has become
more enlightened, more conscious
of its social responsibility and
should continue to do so," Howard
concluded, "as long as it does
not shy away from criticism.'
Winfield Will
Talk on China
Gerald F. Winfield, author of
"China, the Land and the people,"
will speak on "What Next in
China" at 4:15 p.m., Monday in
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Winfield, promotion secretary
for the United Board for Chris-
tian Colleges in China, recently re-
turned from that country after
making an agricultural survey as
a member of the ECA's Commis-
sion for Rural Rehabilitation.
K Ieiistneck Dinner
Planned By Dorm
A recognition dinner honoring
the late Mrs. Caroline Hubbard
Kleinstueck willube held today at
'Kleinstueck House in the New
Women's Residence.
Honor guests at the dinner will
be Mrs. Kleinstueck's three
daughters - Miss Irene Klein-
stueck, Mrs. Carl Blankenburg and
Mrs. Otto Ihling, all of Kalama-
zoo, Mich.
Other descendants of Mrs.
Kleinstueck to be present will in-
clude Dorothy Blankenburg, a
granddaughter, Mrs. Paul Ihling, a
grandniace, and Barbara blan-
kenburg, a great-granddaughter.
For the best deal in corsages,
call
FORMAL FLOWER SERVICE
Telephone 2-3169 ask for Herb
(Discounts on group orders)

TICKET SALE TODAY:
Shakespeare Touring Group
To Present Two Productions

CLASSES COMPETE:
Announce Speech Winners
n2

Howard Hartzell, '52, won first
place in the Speech 31 contest yes-
terday for his delivery of "The
Threat of the Unmarked ."
In the Speech 32 contest, Jack
Beauchamp, '51, took top honors
yesterday for his talk on "Branded
at Birth."
* *1 *
THE WINNERS were chosen on
the basis of delivery and composi-
tion. Members of the speech de-
partment served as judges. j
The participants, all students
in the various sections of the two
courses, were selected by their
classmates to represent them in
the contest.
Six finalists competed from each

course, delivering five-minute ex-
temporaneous speeches.
THE CONTESTS were held to
points up the work done in class
and to give speech students a
chance to hear the good speakers
among their classmates, according
to Edd Miller of the speech de-
partment.
Second and third place winners
of the Speech 31 contest were
Richard Flanagan, '52, and Clyde
Spencer, '51. Taking those posi-
tions in the Speech 32 contest were
Hugh Watson, '50, and Robert
Vaughn, '52.
The Correct Way
Children should be taught to
answer the telephone courteously
and intelligently. A course in
"telephone etiquette" for children
would consist of instructions on
how to speak plainly, to take a
message properly, and call anoth-
er person.

Library Group
To Hold 2-Day
Meeting Here
Representatives from more than
30 colleges and universities will
gather here today and tomorrow
for a national. cooperative com-
mittee meeting on university li-
brary planning.
The committee is designed to
provide consultation for schools
planning construction of libraries.
Members of the committee work
with architects designing such
buildings in order to achieve func-
tional planning of new libraries,
according to W. G. Rice, director
of the University General Library.
4C, IJ

Tickets will be sold for the Mar-
garet Webster Shakespeare Com-
pany's production of "Julius Caes-
ar" and "Taming of the Shrew"
from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. today in the
lobby of the League.
The productions will be pre-
sented Wednesday at Central High
School Auditorium, Ypsilanti.
"Julius Caesar" will be given at 3
p.m. and "Taming of the Shrew"
at 8 p.m.
THE COMPANY is a touring
group formed last year by Miss
Webster to bring Shakespeare to
high schools, colleges and univer-
sities in every state in the union.
Members of the company are all
professionalBroadway actors.
Miss Webster, daughter of the
late British actress Dame May
Witty, is one of the foremost
Shakespearean directors in the
country.
Recently she has directed on
Broadway "Richard II" with
Maurice Evans and "The Tem-
pest" with Arnold Moss.
* * *
MISS WEBSTER, has appeared

Only 10 More Days to
Order those Personalized
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in several Shakespearean roles
herself. She is also the author of
the book "Shakespeare Without
Tears."
Tickets for "Julius Caesar" are
priced at $1.00 and $.60. Prices
for "Taming of the Shrew" are
$2.40, $1.80, $1.20 and $.60.

11

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