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November 28, 1949 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIXTEEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. . . .......

HOUNDED ON HONEYMOON:
VeepPays for Marital Procrastination
By GEORGE WALKER

'If you want to get married, act
now; don't wait until you're Vice-
President of the United States.
Or would you enjoy being
stalked by a hundred news-hungry
hounds, wincing at the glare of a
dozen flash bulbs every time you
held your girl friend's hand, or be-
ing trailed by an army of reporters
when you went shopping for a
ring?
** *
FROM THE time some alert
society editor first noticed a ro-
mantic gleam in the eyes of Alben
W. Barkley, until the marriage
vows a week ago, the "Veep" was
a goner.
Not that the Vice-President had
fallen like a love-sick teenager. It
was just that he had committed
himself to the tremendous match-
making, well-wishing force of the
whole American public, and to
back out was unthinkable.
No schoolboy was ever plagued
with so many persistent publi-
cizers; half a dozen newspaper
syndicates, newsreel companies,
picture agencies, and several
hundred newspapers and maga-
zines chanted "The Veep's got
a girl friend!"
Whenever Mr. Barkley took off
to visit Mrs. Hadley, everybody in
the country knew about it. There
were pictures of the couple danc-
ing together, eating together, and
walking together.
BY the time the pair was ready
to announce their engagement, the
press had already almost married
them off. Bt that didn't prevent
the news from making headlines
everywhere.
And a couple of weeks ago,
when the Vice-President was
seen in a Washington jewelry
shop (he sneaked there after
hours), the press was on the
spot, ready with some em-
barrassing questions.
"Oh, hell," Mr. Barkley finally
sighed, and -admitted he had been
looking for a ring.

HONEYMOON "HAVEN" -Vice-President and Mrs. Alben W.
Barkley stroll down the beach of their well-publicized "Shangri-
La," in Sea Island, Ga. News-hungry reporters and photographers
followed the newlyweds here after tracking the couple like sleuths
throughout their four-month courtship. Mr. and Mrs. Barkley
planned to spend a week in the Georgia resort. (AP Wirephoto)
* * * *

When the couple were married
Nov. 19 in St. Louis, a crowd of
5,000 waited outside the chapel.
Eyeing the battalion of photo-
graphers and newsreel camera-
men,the pubicity battered bride
groaned "I hate to go out to that
mess."
* * *
EVEN AFTER it was all over,
the Barkleys were paying the price
of fame. Reporters watched the
Vice-President's home near Padu-
cah, Ky., waiting for the newly-
weds' car.

'V

;; ROACH PRINTING,

DANCE
PROGRAMS
Tickets, Posters
Christmas Cards
24 Hr. Service

A

But the Vice-President and his
wife had at least evaded their
host of journalistic shadowers,
for a while, anyway, slipping off
to a place Mr. Barkley vaguely
described as "Shangra-la."
Now that it's all over, the press
and the public can congratulate
themselves on a good job of match-
making, while they're waiting for
another public figure to help down
the aisle.
** *
MEANWHILE, Mr. and Mrs.
Barkley can get to work on what
will be a voluminous marriage
scrapbook, and wait for the day
they can sit in privacy before
their television set, following the
courtship and marriage of the
next Public Lover No. 1.
WSSF Seeks
'LargerGoal
"They Still Need You" is the
theme of the World Student Ser-
vice Fund campaign this year as
the organization seeks to top last
year's $488,367.37 by using a
house-to-house canvas system.
This year's goal is $600,000.
There will be no bucket drive on
campus as WSSF hopes to obtain
the support of dormitories, league
houses, fraternities and sororities,
through educating the students to
WSSF's aims.
The funds collected are used by
WSSF to aid needy students
throughout the world. It maintains
rest centers for run down students,
supplies medical aid, helps refugee
and displaced person students and
sends educational supplies such as
books and typewriters to needy
universities abroad.

Five Million
GI's Receive
State Bonus
More Checks
To Be Distributed
By The Associated Press ,
Some five million world var II
veterans have received almost $1,-
500,000,000 in state bonuses.
And checks are still going out.
Another $1,000,000,000 will be dis-
tributed to 2,700,000 additional
vets in bonus paying states.
BUT 30 non-bonus paying states
have indicated reluctance to have
the program extended any further.
An Associated Press survey
shows:
Eighteen states have approved
bonuses totaling $2,500,000,000 for
7,814,515 men and women who
served with the armed forces.
Fifteen of these states now are
paying bonuses. They have paid
out $1,455,598,264 to 5,109,863 liv-
ing vets or the next of kin of their-
dead buddies. The average pay-
ment is about $285.
IN MOST of these states the out-
flow of cash has been reduced to
the last trickle stage. Some of them
have no cutoff dates. But all of the
paying states expect to complete
the job within the next two years.
PENNSYLVANIA voted itself
into the bonus column in Novem-
ber. It will issue $500,000,000 in
bonds to finance payments to
1,215,515 men and women.
Washington state plans to pass
out $80,000,000 to 250,000. Machim-
ery to handle the claims is being
set up in both states.
The Indiana legislature has voted
to give $105,000,000 or more to
385,000 vets, but payments can't
start until enough money is collect-
ed to pay all claims.
WHILE the checks average
about $285, they vary in size. The
most common formula for com-
puting them is $10 per month of
service in the U.S. and $15 per
month of duty abroad.
Eligibility rules vary, too.
Most of them require residence
in the state for six months or a
year before service, at least 90
days in uniform and, as the
phrase goes, a "discharge other
than dishonorable."
West Virginia will vote on a
bonus proposition next November.
If it is accepted, the number of
vets who collect bonuses will pass
the 8,000,000 mark-a bit shy of
half of the 16,535,000 who served
in world war II.
The bonus wave may have passed
its peak. The peak-to date, Pt
least- came in the 1946-48 period,
when 12 states put their o.k. on
bonus plans.
Seeing Eye
The Seeing Eye, Inc., national
philanthropic organization for
training dogs as guides for the
blind, will celebrate its 20th year of
operation this year.
Since its founding in 1929, the
group has trained more than 1,500
dogs for blind men and women
who visited the school for one
month while learning how to use
their dogs.

-W_
By ROBERT CHAMBERLAIN j
Willow Village in 20 minutes,
non-stop, for less than a dime. t
That's the service offered by ther
University to its nearly 2,000 bus
patrons who make the 12-mile trek
between the campus and the gov-
ernment housing project every day.
This is believed to be the largest
daily mass movement performed
by any University.
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY'S entrance
into the bus business dates to early
1946, when thousands of returning
vets were forced to find housing in
Willow Village. Many of them did
not have automobiles, and the
existing commercial bus systems
were not equipped to handle the
5,000-plus students who needed
daily transportation.
Thirty "war-surplus" busses
were leased from the govern-
ment. Then the University hired
19 drivers and set up a schedule
built around the student's needs.
The first year 870,000 persons
were recorded as riding to and
from campus.
Graduation and better housing
facilities in Ann Arbor have cut
this patronage in half, but the

University indicated a permantlat
service when it recently replaced
the 30 over-age vehicles with 12
new 34-passenger coaches.
* *-*
THE Willow Village program is
operated at a loss, ten cents fare
not being enough to cover the cost
of operation. The University thus
subsidizes the system through
state funds.
The University's other bus
program, its chartered trips for
student organizations, is not los-
ing money. They are set up on
a break-even basis. These trips
carry the University Band,
Men's Glee Club, Orchestra, and
many of the athletic teams
throughout the Midwest and as
far east as Massachusetts.
Last year, 35,000 students were
enabled to make trips covering a
dozen states because of the bus
service.
* **
DURING 1948, forestry students
made a two-week tour of furniture
centers which covered 2,200 miles.
The junket carried them into the
Northeastern states, down along
the Atlantic seaboard to Virginia
before returning to Ann Arbor.
The same year the bus system

enabled the Men's Glee Club to
travel throughout theEast and
the University Orchestra to play
in remotesections of the Upper
Peninsula. Geology, botany and
civil engineering departments
use the busses almost daily for
field trips.
In nearly four years of opera-
tion, the University's maize and
blue coaches have travelled more
than 28.000,000 passenger miles.
In that time, not one student has
been injured.

Ten Cent Ante

.

k

I

1

CHRISTMAS
CARDS
20 lines to choose from includ-
ing such famous names as:
PETER HUNT, ALICE DALY,
BERGO-MARVIN, WORKSHOP,
KRISTIAN ELLIOT, T. V.
ALLEN AND ETCHCRAFT.
Other lines priced
from 25 for 1.00 and up
at
FO LLETT'S
State St. at N. University

__.._

f

Book Worms
Harvard University tops the list
of United States colleges and uni-
versities for the number of volumes
in its library. The University has a
total of 5,050,000 books in its
stacks. Notre Dame Universityhas
234,338 books listed in its library.

I

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1949
Data Shows
U.S. Spends
More on Cars
WASHINGTON-(AP)-The Am-
erican people are spending almost
two-thirds as much on autos and
auto parts as they spend on shoes
and clothing.
Federal Reserve Board and
Commerce Department data
showed today that autos and auto
parts take $6.20 of each $100 spent
on consumer purchases. Shoes and
clothing get $9.90.
* * *
COMPILATIONS by these agen-
cies indicated that never before
has the outlay on autos and acces-
sories gone so high.
For one thing, the reserve
board explained, consumer in-
comes are holding high-flowing
at a $210,600,000,000 annual ra'm
in the third quarter of 1949.
This is a solid 190 per cent above
prewar 1939, and 19 per cent
higher than the postwar period
alone, though off three per cent
from the 1948 peak.
For another, time - payment
terms for autos have eased since
credit controls went off early in
1949, car production has gone up
and prices of new cars have held
rather steady while used car
prices were declining.

I

1

I. -

-Daily-Ed Kozma
BUS BUSINESS-Supplying transportation for students has been a University function since 1946,
when veteran housing was established at Willow Village. Three of the University's fleet of 12
Willow Village busses are shown above taking on passengers at the South University stop. Nearly 2,-
000 passengers make the trip daily.

MASS MOVEMENT DAILY:
Dime Buys Ride on Village Bus
^

n 1

DIS1VE

Select your
Christmas

7

Iiitti41,*

OVALA

Nr v "w.:

r '

S SHOP
ty Avenue
N E W B A N K

CHRISTMAS
SUGGESTIONS
Combination Waffle Iron & Grill
TOASTERS
WAFFLE IRONS
Westinghouse & NesCo Roasters
I RONMASTERS TOASTMASTERS
MIXMASTERS COFFEEMASTERS
PRESTO and MIRRO-MATIC
PRESSURE COOKERS
REVERE WARE
ARTHUR G. BEDEN
216 East Huron Street Phone 7181

Cards
Now!

A wide range Of prices and a large
SeleCtion of both individual Cards
and assorted boxes. Names may

III

be imprinted.

at

RnMSaY-CNFIELD, Inc.

TicE 's MEN'
1107 South Universi
ACROSS FROM THE

-jUIi

\ lf/Xmas Shoppers!
t= - For that
QUICK SNACK0
a C
65c SPECIAL LUNCHEONca
EVERY NOON 0
S. . at ...
ri LIBERTY FISH & CHIPS
301 East Liberty<-

119 East Liberty

I.,

I

' Winter Specials

Phone 7900

IA

--

I'I

li ==___ - - -

. I

SPECIALS!!

Take Advantage of our
STUDENT BUNDLE

Recorded "Xas" Selections
Long Playing Records:
ML-4081 ...............Dicken's Xmas Carol
Basil Rathbone
ML-4231.... ...............Hymns for Xmas
Mount Holyoke College Glee Club
CL-6076............Organ Concert of Carols
Richard Key Biggs
DLP-5020....................Xmas Greetings
Bing Crosby
78" Records:
London .................... Christmas Carols
Royal Chorale Society
Victor ...........Christmas Hymns and Carols
Rnhrt Shwnd nVictor Chorale

MEN'S
ALL RUBBER
ZIPPER
GALOSH ES
3425
ANKLE HEIGHT
$3 49

';l

4 Lbs. Minimum . .
Each Additions Pound .

. .50c
..12c

All clothing laundered, fluff dried, and neatly folded.
The following articles are finished at low extra charges
as follows
SHIRTS, additional .............15c
(Starch or no starch exactly as requested)

100%
Wool Flannel {
TROUSERS
49

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