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November 28, 1949 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOURTEEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1949

"WA

VKV!gttta va Ica v-V

SL

Electioneers

Catch
Tabulating
Closes Early
This Year

up

on

Sleep

f

Reduced Quota
SpeedsCounting
The two big student legislature
election days have been over a
week, but officials are just be-
ginning to catch up on their sleep.
After the 6,991 ballots were
sorted and placed before candi-
dates' names on the big horseshoe
counting table used in the Hare
System of Proportional represen-
tation, a quota had to be reached
so SL candidates could be elected.
NORMALLY the quota would
have been the total plus one of all
ballots cast, which would then
have been divided by the number
of offices vacant plus one. This
would have totaled 240.
The ones are added to prevent
ties, according to officials.
But to save time, Tom Walsh
and Herb Weingarten, both law
juniors, and Duane Nuechterlain,
last year's SL elections chairman,
got together with elections chief
Bill Clark and decided to reduce
the quota at the beginning of the
counting. This was done to save
valuable time in recalculating a
lower quota as exhausted ballots
were discarded.

A CHRISTMAS SUGGESTION
FROM MODERN APPLIANCE
THE NEW
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10
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MASHES BLENDS
WHIPS JUICES
BEATS FOLDS
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(1.) JUST THE BEGINNING-You've got to sort 'em before you count 'em. Claire Davis, Leonard
Wilcox, Phyllis Rosen, Jim Jans and Hugh Greenberg (left to right) sort ballots before putting all
first-place ballots before each of the candidates' 58 names on a huge horseshoe table in the Union.
It took two hours to sort the 6,91 ballots. Then the fun begins.

A Daily
Photo
Feature
Stories by Peter Hotton
and Roma Lipsky
Photos by Wally Barth
and Carlyle Marshall
What a Spot
For Christmas
Shopping!
"STORYLAND and
TOYTOWN" on
FOLLETTS
2nd Floor - State at North U.

* * * *

(2.) THE INTERESTING PART STARTS-Bill Clark, elections
chairman, talks with Herb Weingarten, who is working a BusAd
School calculator to figure out a quota for electing candidates
under the Hare System.
Novice Legislators To Attend
First SL Session This Week

EXHAUSTED
those which run
written in before
names.

BALLOTS are
out of numbers
each candidates'

(3.) REDISTRIBUTING BALLOTS-After ballbts have been re-
distributed according to number preference, Mary Lubeck (left)
walks around the table calling off the number of additional votes
I each candidate picked up on consequent redistributions.

THE N S1iIIIT PIX

C:

j 1'47

3 t
COMPLETE PROTECTION
PROTECTION
PLUS when you're
away from home. /
ALWAYS
a shirt you can ;
E wearTith pride.
THEV THAT PEOPLE SEE

Clean Tactics
I arkVoting
Though this year's voting was
22 under the record set last fall,
it was only four under last spring's
balmy election which was marked
by a stuffed ballot at the Engi-
neering Arch.
This year the only fraud was in
petitioning, and the Campus Po-
lice saw to it that voters were
honest. Eighty-one ballots were
invalidated in comparison with
"more than 40" last spring.
LAST FALL'S elections were
marred by the disqualifying of 52
out of 107 candidates whose pe-
titions were found by Men's Ju-
diciary to be full of fraud and
forged names "by the dozen."
But the election itself, postpon-
ed a week to give re-petitioners a
chance to get 50 names again, was
an all-time record of 7,013 voters.
Read and Use
Daily Classified Ads

Their theory was that the
quota woudl be reduced anyway,
so after an hour and a half of
arguing the pros and cons of the
plan, they dropped the quota 30
votes, to 210.
Last year the quota slumped 45
votes and counting dragged on
until 4:30 a.m. This year counters
got home at 3 a.m. Their only
worry was that the "pre-reduced"
quota wouldnt go down as far as
210.
* * *
IF IT DIDN'T, candidates who
made it later in the evening would
havebeen selected on a larger
quota than those earlier elected.
"We didn't know what we
would have done if it didn't,' one
of the lawyers said, "but as it was
the quota hit exactly 210 and there
was no adjusting to worry about.
The new theory had the advan-
tage of having the election of all
candidates on an equal quota, ali
saved counters an hour and a half
from last year. Upshot of the plan
was that it took an hour and a half
to figure it out, thus cancelling out
the time that was saved.
ACCORDING to the old theory,
early candidates would have been
elected on a bigger quota than
those elected later, but each quota
would have been in correct propor-
tion.
When the ballots were finally
sorted, 81 turned out to be in-
valid in SL elections alone,
mainly because voters didn't
read directions on their ballots
and wrote in X's instead of num-
bers before candidates' names.
Another major cause of invali-
dations was the lack, of punch
marks on ballots. One bright voter
even filled in his numbers in the
example spaces.
One of the Board in Control of
Student Publications candidates
was chagrined at the overabund-
ance of invalidated ballots. "Just
to think we lost 30 or 40 votes
through sheer carelessness," he
moaned.
As things turned out, after all
the theorizing and arguments,
election officials were able to drag
themselves home comparatively
early in the morning.

Twenty-three brand-new legis- the Regents, and more recently, R E CO.
lators will start their duties thisteUiest-id lnt okMODIERN PPL ANC CO
week at SL's first meeting since the University-wide plan to look
the elections. into students' gripes and opinions 115 E. Liberty St. Phone 2-3286
Though 28 candidates w e r e of how the University should be
elected, five are incumbents. run. .5Y54SY6'CYl 3SSĀ§ 536'Y M
They will have the job of pass- >z;;;;;;;;yo ;o ;o ;;;o ;o ;o;o z;;;;;;
ing legislation proposed by fellow
politicoes at the bi-weekly meet-
ings and working on one of the
Legislature's committees.
LATEST COMMITTEE to be set
up is the Human Relations Coin-v Handmade Table and Bridge Sets
mittee, chaired by its creator, Tom
Walsh. Though it is not exclusive- o
ly an SL project, it is under theo0
Legislature's sponsorship.
Members include presidents
and chairmen of many impor- 52x52 LUNCHEON SETS 52x52
tant student organizations. Pur-
pose is to approach the discrimi-f Hand-embroidered and drawn out. 6 napkins . .. .9.95
nation problem in all campus
organizations with a view to in-
tegrating them into working to-
gether toward solid intergroup 52x52 LUNCH SETS 52x52
cooperation and understanding.
Other SL groups include: The Hds
NSA Committee, which deals with ' ''H'and-embroidered . .'. 6 napkins.........5.95, 6.95
national student interests; Cam-
pus Action and Cultural and Edu-
cational Committees, which work36
on general projects concerning 36X36 BRI DGE SETS 36x36
student activities.
sun*tv*sHand-embroidered, 4 napkins, sets at 2.49, 2.98, 3.98
VARSITY COMMITTEE, which
made pep rallies and school spirit c
possible; Citizenship Committee, 0
which handled the elections; and Hand-embroidered GUEST TOWELS
Public Relations Committee.
Students were able to sit to- White and Colored . . . 69c, 1.69, 1.75 and 1.98 each.
gether at football games this year
as the result of SL's quick work at
the beginning of the semester.o0
They bargained the athletic de-
partment into dropping its "No
block seating at football games"
Other big projects just begin-CP
ning to take form in SL Commit- X out
tees are an investigation into the 21 1 South Main
University marking system, agita-
tion for more faculty evaluation
and informal get-togethers with ___o_____________o_______""_ _"_oc""__>_<_""""__o_>__o__=-
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