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November 28, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4TMA-T QO M M im

THE MICHIG va.a .. A N-t . .~ Aa.IY

P.ACIF FTVF.

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U.S. School
Plan Lauded
B Thurston
America's educational system
has made an enormous contribu-
tion to the progress of the nation,
Dr. Lee Thurston, state superin-
tendent of public instruction de-
clared here yesterday.
This is largely because Ameri-
can schools have traditionally been
interested in the practical prob-
lems of daily living-a character-
istic not found in the schools of
other nations, according to Thurs-
ton.
* * *
THE EDUCATOR spoke before
a regional conference on rural ed-
ucation. The conference, which is
being attended by delegates from
the five Great Lake states, is spon-
sored by the National Education
Association.
"Education in this country has
in large measure been respon-
sible for the creation of an
enormous middle class," Thurs-
too continued.
"This is in contrast to most
countries of the old world which
have a small middle class, smaller
'upper crust' and enormous lower
class."
Printing Date
Set forEssay
"A Man from South Dakota,"
Hopwood award-winning paper by
George S. -Reeves of the English
Department will be published next
year by E. P. Dutton and Co.
The essay, which won a major
prize in last year's Hopwood con-
test, is an aecount of the author's
22 years experience in South Da-
kota, where he operated a sheep.
ranch after his graduation from
the University in 1926.
Reeves returned to the Univer-
sity in 1948 to work on his master's
degree in English. He is also an
instructor..

Before -Thanksgiving-After

FEET-FIVE TO ONE:
'U' Transportation Still'
Runs at Walker's Pace

By DON KOTITE
In an era of "whizzer" bikes and
"Super-Eights," the majority of
University students still prefer--
or are stuck with-footpower, a
check of University files has re-
vealed.
But nearly 3,000 wheel addicts
have been fortunate enough to se-
cure school permits for their cars
this term, Johr Gwin of the Office
of Student Affairs pointed out.
* * * -
THIS FIGURE represents a drop-
of about 500 from last year, he
explained.
E a rier University records
show that the proportion, of car,
owners to non-drivers has fluc-
tuated widely from year to year,
since the auto ban first went
into effect in 1927.
"The biggest influx came im-
mediately after both wars, when
so many married students flooded
the campus," Gwin explained.
He remembers a case two years

o r

I

back when a male student - with
tongue-in-cheek - requested a
permit for a 1916 Model T Ford.
* * *
"I WAS QUITE perplexed,"
Gwin said. "He informed me the
car hadn't run for three months
but that he was busily working on
it and it was due to break moor-
ings 'any time.'"
lie gave the determined stu-
dent an "experimental" permit,
to be valid in case the impossible
happened and the auto func-
tioned, Gwin explained.
Bicycle transportation, though
virtually unknown on most other
campuses, is still just as popular
this year, according to files check-
ed at the Ann Arbor City Clerk's
office.
Records reveal nearly 1,100 stu-
dents have licensed their bikes
through the local office this term.
But there are not more than
five students with licensed motor
scooters, records indicate.

Union to Hold
BridgeContest
An all-campus duphlicate ,bidgce
tournament will be spIonsored by
the Union at 2 p.m. sunday at
the Michigan Union.
All students are eligible to com-
pete in the tourney and tit win-
ning team and runners-up will be
awarded individual tropliies. An
entrance fee of one dollar will be
charged.
The Union will hold its regular
weekly bridge tournament at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow.
Read and l'se
Daily Cl assi fied Ads
. . . r - rr r .-'-rw r
JENKS & CO,
* *
221 EAST LIBERTY
Phone 2-6220

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UNBEATABLE . .

A FORMAL
A FAVORITE DATE
and
FLOWERS from CAMPUS

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JAY. Y' .x
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CORSAGE

SERVICE

call 3-1824 between 7-11 P.M.
- Get the Best for the Least -
SPECIAL PRICES FOR GROUP ORDERS

"HOLLYWOOD WOULD BLUSH AT"
ROSSELINI'S -Time Magazine
faguh Dialogue Produced In Rome
The Lives and Laves of GI's
in Italy! English Dialogue
c ~v
j \
ANY SIZE
'0
$2.50-$15.00
Fine Selection
of Fruits -
V RABIDEAV'S FOOD MARKET
OPEN 9 A.M. - 9 P.M. Daily - Sundays - Holidays
721 East Huron Phone 7686
/'oa/e,<-- Y ,/ < -y o< -YYq< -po w<--

--Daily-Alex Lmanlan
COMPARISON PROVES-Above are two shots of the same literary college class. The top picture
was taken last Wednesday morning; the bottom one on Friday. Obvious differences in attend-
ance are attributable to a yearly habit of the American people-the celebration of Thanksgiving.
Empty seats in the lower photo are usually occupied by students who stayed at home to finish the
turkey begun the day before. Those who were present Friday assisted Residence Halls in consum-
ing the remains of Thursday's dinner.

I.'

I

NO RADICALS, NO NOTHIN

'U' Life fHits 'Truce' IAfter 15 Years

By JANET WATTS
Without a radical group purge, a
visit from a prominent Commu-
nist or even a picket line, campus
life this year has been the most
peaceful in 15 years.
But this University has seen the
day of Communists from Gerhart
Eisler, alien, to Ed Shaffer, stu-
dent, and both men have left their
impact.
* * *
STUDENT arrests have been re-
corded here, too. Five students,
including a Daily reporter, an
alumnus, a bystanderrid a local
book store owner were arrested on
various charges in April, 1937, and
the campus went up in arms.
A radical student organiza-
tion, the Student Workers Fed-
eration, had led campus partici-
pation in a pin setters strike for
higher wages at a local bowling
alley.
When Ralph Naef us, group
chairman, addressed the crowd of
about 50, he was arrested. Another
SWF leader rose to speak and he
too was arrested.
* * *
SECONDS LATER, as a Daily
reporter attempted to learn the
reason for the arrests, he was tak-
en for "interfering with arrest."
Naefus was arrested on a

charge of "makifig a public ad-
dress without permission of the
mayor." Later city court offi-
cials could find no such regula-
tion in city records so the charge
was changed to "loitering."
Naefus and three others spent
the night in jail but the Daily re-
porter was freed on a bail provided
by the Daily.
* * *
ALL FIVE were found guilty on
various counts and required to pay
fines. The bookstore owner who
heckled the pickets was fined for
profanity.
Ten years later 2,500 students
were up in arms again, this time
with snowballs in their hands as
Gerhart Eisler came to town.
The sponsoring group, Michigan
Youth For Democratic Action,
had been kicked off campus the
previous semester.
Since it was not recognized,
MYDA was forced to find off cam-
pus grounds for the Eisler talk.
With a city okay for Felch Park
secured, MYDA men thought they
could go ahead with their plans.
But later that snowy December
day, Mayor Brown rescinded the
okay.
POLICE WAITED for mob ac-
tion, but Eisler and fellow traveler
Carl Marzani bypassed the crowd
and drove to the apartment of
Edward Shaffer, MYDA leader.
There in a room lighted only by
candles, Eisler held a press confer-
ence for about 150 persons.
Students Legislature opened

the way for an Eisler reappear-
ance, but the University Lecturq
Committee turned down the SL
debate bid featuring the Num-
ber One Communist.
The past five years have seen
the rise and demise of left wing
groups. MYDA fell when Governor
Kim Sigler ordered an investiga-
tion of "subversive activities" at
the University in the spring of
1947.
i n'50?

Round trip
via steamship .
Student Round Trip via
regular airines.$433
BOSTON-LONDON S r
Rates between other points on
request. Free ticket for groups
of 10 or mor.
STUDENT GROUP TOURS
o days $940

. R-_
LUG BOO K S r674rijtnaj-
THEY MAKE IDEAL GIFTS FOR EVERYONE
- and for tlhe easiest, most convenient way to get them, use
our small store with its complete stock of all types of books.

E

.

StoreEHours:
OPEN EVEN INGS
115 W. Liberty St. Dec. 5, 12, 19, 21
Gifts for the Whole Family

I

Hobbies
Hobby Tools
Model Planes
Model Trains
Model Cars
Model Boats
Plastics
Drafting Tools
Games
Puzzles

Fountain Pens
Pencils
Desk Sets
Pencil Sharpeners
Staplers
Security Chests
Leather Goods
Stationery
Lamps
Diaries
rt6 % - --

WITH SMOKERS WHO KNOW... IT'S
~arne/s o
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7/ /l I

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