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November 24, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-24

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PAGE EIGHT

THlE RliCHIGAN DAILY

THrURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1919

Michigan

Sets

Pace

In

Child

Care

U

PROBLEM SOLVING-Clarence F. Ilamsay, superintendent of
the Michigan Children's Institute, discusses a problem with Busi-
ness Manager Delmar Wright as Mrs. Mary Van Tuyle, Ramsay's
seretrtakes notes. More than 80 workers make up the staff
of th Insttute

THE MICHIGAN CHILDREN'S INSTITUTE

Places

State

Wards

in

Foster

Homes

GOING FORt A RIDE--Mrs. Mary De Lapp, a social worker, takes
one of the girls to an approved home where she will be boarded un-
til she is adopted. Each home is visited every two weeks to make
sure the child and the people caring for her are getting along sat-
isfactorily.

F

The philosophy of the Michigan
Chilren's Institute-to pirovide
every child with a family who can
understand and love him--has
made it a unique experiment in
child welfare.
Founded in 1933 to succeed the
State Public School by an Act of
Legislature, the present MCI was
suggested by Clarence F. Ramsay,
then superintendent of the Pub-
lic School and now the Institute's
director,.

small receiving home through
which a boarding home program
could be operated by a skilled
staff-plus consideration of the
individual child's welfare-the
MCI has proven that such a plan
is in many ways superior to a
large orphan home.
The headquarters of the MCI,
located at 1447 Washington
Heights, serves not only as the
central office dispensing inf or-
mation and social services, but
also is the receiving home for

* * *
Following Ramsay's

plan of a

DAI LY PH OTO F EAT URE
Story by DOLORES LASCH EVER
Pictures by BARNEY LASCHEVER

BUDDING ARTISTS-Mrs. June Fink, girls' recreational worker, teaches a class in drawing in the
sewing room. The girls also have a lounge with their owin books and toys. Children at the Institute
attend school in the morning and spend their afternoons under the care of recreational workers who
plan outdoor programs when the weather permit and indoor activities if necessary.

children having personality and
behavior problems.
The receiving home-its pur-
pose is to provide a physical and
emotional setting where staft
members may study the child's
needs-has room for 11 boys and
nine girls ranging in age from five
to 18.
* * *
THlE BOYS and girls have their
own rooms on separate floors.
Each floor has a combination
lounge-recreation room. Boys and
girls eat together in the same din-
ing room but at separate tables.
During their stay at the In-
stitute, an average of 30 days,
children attcnd classes during
the morning at the University
Hospital's school which is pro-
vided for child patients.
Other facilities which the Univer-
sity offers are physical examina-
tions by a University Hospital doc-
tor, dental care at the clinic
maintained by the School of Den-
cinic atdUniversity Hospital.th
IN ADDITION, a full-time psy-
chologist is always on hand and
psychiatrists ares available for con-
sultations.
Children at the receiving
home, spend their afternoons
with recreational advisers who
instruct them In games and
generally provide an atmos-
phere in which children can be-
come more socially minded.
While the child is receiving re-
adjustment training at the MCI,
members of the homefinding de-
partment are on the lookout for
homes of persons who will make
suitable foster parents.
* * *
A CHILD for whom a home is
found is then placed out in one
of four ways:
1. The State pays the foster
parents for caring for the child;
2. The foster family cares for
the child free of charge; or ac-
tually adopts it;
3. Foster parents pay older
children to work after school i-n
return for room, board and a
small wage;
4. The most disturbed children
are boarded in study homes.
So long as the child remains a
ward of the State he is visited ap-
social worker who makes sure the
ehild and his foster parents are
satisfied.

3
p

BOYS' WORKSHOP-David (Doc) Davis, boys' recreational di-
rector, shows one of the boys how to use the electric saw, one of
the machines available for use in the boys' workshop. If weather
permits, Davis plans outdoor games like baseball or football.

CHOP STICKS--A matron looks on while children gather around
one of the boys as Jie plays the niano in the boys' lounge. The boys
also have their own library and radio. On Saturdays, the recrea-
tional worker usually takes them to the movies.

PAT DASAgr fsa ha
parties the Institute gives for
the children to celebrate a holi-
day.

NEW HOME-A child mneets her new foster parents for the first
time. An effort is made to find a home suitable to the needs of
the child. Children are boarded out as wards of the State of Michi-
gan until they are adopted or until they become 19 years old.

OFF TO SCHOOL-Mrs. Edna Adams, a matron at the Institute,
sends three of the children off to classes. Children from the .In-
stitute attend the University Hlospital school which is maintained
for children who are confined there as patients.

I

PROBLEM SOL VE R:
'U' Engineers To Construct
NewComputingMachine

A new computing machine, first
Df its kind at the University, will
soon be built by the electrical en-
gineering department in the East
Engineering Building.
eNC.dents will construct the ma-
phlne~ an analogue computor,
along a standard pattern. It will
take about a year to build, accord-
lng to Gunnar Hok, research engi-
neer bor the University.
THE COMPUTOR will solve ma-
thematical problems too complex
Answers will be in graph form.
Psych Group Will
Hold Discussion
The Psychology Colloquium will
meet at 3:30 p.m. Monday in the
basement of Lane Hall to discuss

Where a problem cannot be work-
ed by ordinary mathematical func-
tions, it will be expressed in terms
of new functions that are not now
known.
Much time will be saved by
using the machine, Hok said.
It will be capable of solving, in
a few minutes, complicated dif-
ferential equations that would
takes hours to work by hand.
Research students will be great-
ly benefited by this new addition.
It will be available to anyone who
has an insoluble problem, whether
or not he is connected with the
electrical engineering department.
THE COMPUTOR WILL BE
mounted on two relay racks, each
about the size of an ordinary filing
cabinet. 1It wilubetransportable,
wihwil be a futer aid tois
use for research.

'U> Muem
To Be Open to
PublicToni oht
Natural history exhibits in the
University Museums Building will
be open to visitors from 7 to 9 p.m.
tomorrow.
The evening hours have been set
to accommodate persons unable
to visit the museums during the
day.
Colored movies on "Fertiliza-
tion" and "Seashore Oddities" will
be shown at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Rm. 3024 of the Museums Build-
ing.
Dioramas on the fourth floor
Hall ofBiological Principle ea-
on a New England wharf, and
life in caves.
Life and customs of the Chippe-
wa Indians, early inhabitants of
Michigan, are shown in four other
dioramas produced by Carleton W.

By JOHN DAVIES
Subtlety reigned in many campus
classrooms yesterday anci the day
before as droves of University in-
structors managed to convey the
idea thatr they would "be outheof
BtuetsUniversity regulation pre-
vented most of them from blurting
out-right that they would bolt
their Friday and Saturday cla:U es.
A few professors actually came
out with it and told their students
they'd be gone over the weekend.
ONE PHILOSOPHY professor,
for instance, apologized, saying he
didn't feel too sorry for the stu-
dents, inasmuch as the general
library would be open to fill their
class time.
Other teachers found ways to
4T P m3nh e~

SUBT LETY REIGNS:
Professors Avoid Problems
Of Post-HolidayAttendance

Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classifieds

say- the same thing less direct-
ly-"you know you can leave if
I dn' sow up in ten minuts
"I don't suppose I'll be seeing
many ofyou thisbSaturday,'"
"ve lotmy rollbo n
don't think I'll find it until Mon-
day"' were examples of indirect
communication reported.
A number of instructors man-
aged to give 'assignments for Tues-
day or Wednesday, somewhow
avoiding weekend ones.
Many students learned that if
they did attend weekend sessions,
they would be faced with a pe-
culiar menu of activities. A psy-
chology lecturer said he will speak
in Sanskrit, Greek and Latin-all
were, of course, welcome to attend.
* * *
OTHER PROFESSORS slated
"review" or "make sessions for

* THEY MAKE IDEAL GIFTS
and for the easiest, most COnvenient way to get
thoe oos - use our smal store with its com-
p lee stock.
V VYWe will gift wrap any purChase and,/or wrap

'I

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