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November 24, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TilURSDAY, NOVEIBER 24, 1949

Wahi Elected'M' a ptain;KempthornMos

aluable

Giant Tackle Succeeds
Wistert in Team Election

*S * :

Al Wistert -- All-Ainericai
Tackle on National Teamj

a

*

Kempthorn Rates Call
As Team's Top Player

Al Wahl, a stalwart tackle who
has anchored the right side of
Michigan's line for two years, has
succeeded his left side counterpart,
Independent entries for the
Intra-Mural Basketball League
must be in by December 1. If
enough interest in bowling' is
shown, this sport will be added
to the Independent agenda.
Those interested should phone
the I-M building in the near
future.
-Bill Tomko
Al Wistert, as captain of the Wol-
verine football team.
The election was held at a local
photographer's studio, where the
1949 team picture was being taken.

It was the fiftieth time a Michigan
captain had been chosen there.
WAHL FOLLOWS in the foot-
steps of his uncle, Herb Steger,
who captained the 1925 Wolverine
team. The Oak Park, Illinois sen-
ior first came to Michigan in 1945
and was regarded as anoutstand-
ing freshman prospect. He enter-
ed the Army, however, which
shelved his football career for a
while. While in service he won
the Army Golden Gloves title in
the German area.
He returned to Michigan last
fall and the six-foot-three, 225-
pound lad immediately took over
the right tackle position.
Al Wistert, who captained this
year's squad to the co-champion-
ship of the Western Conference,
said that he thought the team
had made an excellent choice. "Al
has the poise and leadership ability
it takes to captain the team."
HEAD COACH Bennie Oooster-
baan echoed Wistert's statements,
adding, "He is a fine player, I'm
sure he'll carry on. in the Michigan
tradition."

Al Wistert, Michigan captain
and outstanding defensive tackle,
was named to the first team of a
national news service All-Ameri-
can squad yesterday.
Wistert, who at 33 is one of the
oldest collegiate football players,
edged out Notre Dame's Jim Mar-
tin for the coveted position, which
was his for the second straight
years.
CHARLIE ORTMANN, depend-
able Wolverine tailback, was a
second team selection in the poll,
which comprised the selections of
313 sportswriters over the nation.
Michigan State's Ed Bagdon
was also named to the first term

at a guard spot, climaxing a bril-
liant career at the East Lansing
school.
The Midwest placed seven men
on the first team, with Notre
Dame, the nation's top grid aggre-
gation. dominating the vote. The
Irish placed Leon .Hart, Emil Sit-
ko, and Bob Williams on the squad.
HART, THE mountainousend,
led the balloting with all but four
of the 313 votes. Sitko and Wil-
liams were named to the backfield.
Minnesota's Gophers were the only
other college to win more than one
berth, with tackle Leo Nomellini
and center Clayton Tonnemaker
gaining the laurels.
Southern Methodist's courg$ 0-
ous back, Doak Walker, and
Army quarterback Arnold Ga-
liffa round out the first team
backfield. Other line selections
went to guard Rod Franz of Cali-
fornia and end Art Weiner of
North Carolina.
Charley (Choo-Choo) Justice,
the North Carolina whiz kid, was

Dick Kempthorn, hard-hittingI
2 afullback, was named the most val-
uable player on the Michigan gridI
squad by his teammates yesterday.
The compactly-built Senior
from Canton, Ohio has been a de-
fensive standout for two seasons
and was a tower of strength in the
1948 Rose Bowl clash with South-
ern Cal. Kempthorn's crushing
tackling and line-smashing stood
the Maize and Blue in constant
DICK KEMPTHORN good stead during the past grid
Most Valuable season.
READY FOR TROUBLE:
Return o Twoa Cham
Bolsters Gymnast Team

AL WAHL
. . . Captain

Red Wings Down Rangers'
By 4-3 C Carveth Stars

NEVER A CLEVER offensive
performer, Kempthorn was still
an asset to the Wolverines when
these extra two or three yards
were needed. But it was on defense
that the "Killer" stood out, and
many a spectator has gone away
shaking his head after anKemp-
thorn afternoon.
In this year's Little Brown
Jug battle, Kempthorn was in-
strumental in stopping the
Gophers from Minnesota cold.
And it was like that in game
after game.
Many sports experts consider
him one of the greatest Michigan
line backers since the days of
Adolph (Germany) Schultz. Visit-
ing sportswriters from all parts
of the country have acclaimed him
as the outstanding defensive full-
back in collegiate circles.
STRANGELY ENOUGH, Kemp-
thorn hasn't rated All-American
honors on any of the teams so tir
The Intramural building will
be open for Co-recreational ac-
tivities between 7:30 and 10:30
Friday night. I-D cards are re-
quired.
-Vern Muncy
announced. But around Ann Ar-
bor, f ew would rate any player in
the nation above him on the basis
of clever play diagnosis, clean
hard tackling, and old-fashioned
guts.
His departure from the Michigan
football scene leaves a gap which
will be very hard to plug.

)'k i~Ar A

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DETROIT - (P) - The Detroit
Red Wings, National Hockey
League leaders, had their hands
full last night in turning back
the New York Rangers, 4-3, in a

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thrilling game that saw the New
Yorkers drop their role of "cousin"
to the Detroit team. Joe Carveth
scored twice for the Winks.
Bruins Win.. .
BOSTON -(P) - Captain Milt
Schmidt, the Boston Bruins' vet-
eran center, came up with his first
goal of the current National Hock-
ey League season to clinch a 3-1
victory over the Toronto Maple
Leafs last night before an 11,744
crowd at the Boston Garden.
LIT Romps
DETROIT - Lawrence Tech
opened its basketball season last
night with a resounding 89 to 64
victory over an Army five from
Selfridge Field.
Jim Stepler, veteran center, and
Roger Adams, a sophomore for-
ward, got 13 points apiece to lead
the Tech cagers. Jim Olson of
Selfridge, a private from Chicago,
was top scorer with 28 points.
The Blue Devils had a 38-29
advantage at halftime.
In a preliminary, the Lawrence
Tech Freshmen defeated High-
land Park Junior College, 69 to 50.
Gopher Captain :R
MINNEAPOLIS - Dave Skrien,
junior fullback, was elected cap-
tain of the 1950 University of Min-
nesota football team yesterday.
Skrien, from Morris, Minn., is
first backfield man to be named
captain since Bruce Smith in 1941.

.I

521 EAST LIBERTY
Michigan Theatre Bldg.

AL WISTERT
- . . All American
nosed out of a first team berth by
Galiffa in the closest race of the
balloting. Weiner also was given
a close shave, with Rice's Jim Wil-
liams just missing the top position.
THE MIDWEST also dominated
the second team, gettnng five of
the eleven selections. Other sec-
ond team choices were George To-
neff of Ohio State and Stan West
of Oklahoma at guards; Wade
Walker of Oklahoma and Martin
of Notre Dame at tackle; Dan
Foldberg of Army and Williams of
Rice at end, and Robert Fuchs of
Missouri at center.
Backfield berths on the second
squad went to Michigan State's
iron man, Lynn Chandnois, Ed
Lebaron of College of Pacific, Jus-
tice, and Ortmann.
ON TU1ANKSGIVING
Let us be thankful for all things
in our Democratic Society that we
cherish in friendship, sincerity, and
cooperation.
The Daseola Barbers

Aided by the return of two
champions, Coach Newt Loken's
gymnasts will open a nine-game
schedule against the University.of
Chicago on January 14.
The gymnastics team will be out
to improve on their enviable rec-
ord of last year when they took six
out of seven dual meets and fin-
ished third in the Western Con-
ference.
THE TWO BIG guns for Loken's
acrobats will be Ed Buchanan, a
junior, who is the only man in
the history of trampolining to hold
the Western Conference, Western
Open, NCAA, and National AAU
championships in one year, and
Captain Pete Barthell, also a jun-
ior, who last year garnered the
Western Conference tumbling and
parallel bar crowns, the only
double winner in the Big Nine.
Four home meets are sched-
uled for the Wolverines. They
meet Minnesota on February 15,
Indiana on February 18, and
then do not return to the Sports
Building until March 11 when
* * *
1950 Schedule
Jan. 14 Chicago There.
Feb. 15 Minnesota Here.
Feb. 18 Indiana Here.
Feb. 25 Wisconsin and Iowa
at Wisconsin.
March 4 Ohio State and Pur-
due at Ohio State.
March 11 Mich. State Here.
March 18 Kent State Here.
March 25 Conference Meet at
Iowa.
April 1 NCAA Meet at West
Point.
Lions Have Hopes
To Leave Cellar
DETROIT - (P) - The Detroit
Lions have hopes of climbing out
of the National Football League
cellar as they get set for today's
Thanksgiving morning clash with
the Chicago Bears.
A Detroit victory would elevate
the Lions to fourth place in the
NFL, the highest a Detroit team
has been since the 1945 season. The
Bears, who beat the Lions, 27-24,
earlier this season, need a victory
today to retain a mathematical
chance for the Western Division
title.

By GEORGE FLINT
A freshman squad which has
displayed backfield speed and a
degree of line strength is bringing
smiles to the face of Wolverine'
grid coach Bennie Oosterbaan
these days.
This year's frosh prospects, re-
putedly the best in years, will
furnish the 1950 edition of the
offense-hungry Mlaize and Blue
with a good crop of speedy backs,
a couple of likely prospects for
Dick Kempthorn's line backing
vacancy, and an aggregation of
linemen which is weak at guard
and end but could surprise.
* * *
TOPPINGthe backfield pros-
pects are Bill Billings of Flint, a
capable punter and passer, and
Ypsilanti's Dave Hill. The latter
is a runner of the Gene Derricotte
type, and his passing has shown
improvement during the fall prac-
tice sessions.
Freshman coach Wally Weber
used both of these boys at the
tailback spot. Other promising
left halves include Edward Kress
of Detroit and Bob Hurley of
Alamosa, Colorado.
The fullback post is conspicuous
for its depth of talent. Roger Zat-
koff, Hamtramck's pride and joy,
seems a likely successor to Kemp-
thorn behind the forward wall.

TED TOPER, who comes from
the hot bed of Indiana football,
East Chicago, is big and rangy
and should give Zatkoff a run
for the laurels when spring prac-
tice rolls around.
The right half position, though
well-manned on the Wolverine
varsity, will receive further bol-
stering from Tom Witherspoon
of Detroit, Wes Bradford of
Troy, Ohio, and Frank Howell
of Muskegon Heights.
The quarterback spot, which is
wide open in 1950, will be sought
after by Mark Scarr of Barberton,
Ohio, and a couple of southpaw
passing artists, Harry Stuhldreher,
Jr. of Madison, Wisconsin, and
Dave Krupp from Port Clinton,
Ohio.
BUT IN THE line the yearling
talent begins to get a little sparse.
Although Weber had a rugged-
looking tackle in South. Bend's
Dick Strozewski, and a possible
successor to center Bob Erben in
Grand Rapids' Emil Morlock, the
line strength wasn't great.
Although new at the position,
Lowell Perry of Ypsilanti showed
much speed and pass-catching
ability this fall. He'll have to fight
it out with Dick Aartila of Mar-
quette and Carl Brunsting of
Rochester, Minn., for a chance at
the end post held by Irv Wisniew-
ski this year.

0

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I

Bennie's Smiling These Days;
Frosh Display Grid Strength

they take on Michigan State's
Spartans. The final home meet
of the season will be against
Kent State University on March
18.
Two biggest meets of the season
will be the Conference get-togeth-
er at Iowa on March 25, and the
NCAA tourney at West Point on
April Fool's Day.
TRIANGULAR meets are booked
with Wisconsin and Iowa on Feb-
ruary 325, and Ohio State and
Purdue at Columbus on March 4.
Loken will get his first look at a
crew of rapidly-improving tum-
blers and trampoliners In competi-
tion when this year's varsity tan-
gles with the alumni next Friday
at the IM Building.

t

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Discount on

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