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November 20, 1949 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-20

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 20. 1949'

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F.TTv I csa s NfVV a;&,V PAUW A 1Q&QW

Trojans Defeat UCLA
Penn State Loses, 19-0

onference DeadlockedRose Bowl Set

____ _

LOS ANGELES-(P)--Southern
California's Trojans, riding on the
gifted southpaw pitching of a
fourth string quarterback named
Dean Schneider, defeated the
Bruins of UCLA yesterday, 21 to
7,-in their annual crosstown duel.
The Trojans broke a 7-7
deadlock in the last four min-
utes of the game and added
another touchdown in the final
seconds, cashing in on a gift
opportunity.
Troy went ahead in the second
quarter as Schneider sent the
team 77 yards in 11 plays.
Schneider completed six out of ten
passes.
Office and Portable Models
TYPEWRITERS
of all makes
Sold,
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
CHRISTMAS CARDS
MORRILL'S
314 South State St.
G. I. Requisitions Accepted

PITTSBURGH- (A')-Lou (Bim-
be) Cecconi, Pitt halfback, wound
up his college football career in a
blaze of glory yesterday as he led
the Panthers to a 19-0 conquest
of traditional rival Penn State.
Cecconi scored twice and pitch-
ed a pass for the third touchdown.
A chilled crowd of 44,571 hud-
dled under blankets as intermit-
tent snow squalls and freezing
rains alternately pelted them.
I uck-TxiedI

First Downs .........14
Net Yards Rushing ..147
Forward Passes Att. .. 21
Forward Passes Com. . 5
Yards Passing ....... 84
Forwards Int. By .... 1
Yards Run Back Int. 0
Punting Aver.........38.1
Total all kicks ret. .. .51
Fumbles............. 2
Oppon.Fumbles Rec2
Yards Lost Penalties . 15

10
187
32
9
101
2
26
46.1
47
3
1
26

GopbersDump__adgers
MINNEAPOLIS-(AP)-Minnesota put on a second-half surge to
defeat Wisconsin, 14-6, in the final game of the year for both teams.
The Gophers had to come from behind to turn the trick. Wis-
consin exhibited a fighting spirit that enabled them to outplay .the
Gophers and enjoy a 6-0 lead at the end of the first half.
FULLBACK GENE EVANS was Wisconsin's offensive star. He
contributed several important gains to the Badger attack in the
first half besides making a spectacular 62-yard gallop down the side-
lines on a punt return for Wisconsin's lone score. Minnesota full-
back Dave Skrein blocked Lisle Blackbourn's kick.
Midway in the third period the Gophers caught up with
the tiring Badgers. They worked the ball into Wisconsin terri-
tory and then halfback Walt Hausken raced into the end zone
to score on George Hudak's 25-yard pass. That tied the score
and Gordy Soltau's kick put the Gophers ahead.
The fourth period opened with MinnesotaonWisconsin's 35-
yard line. Power plays moved the ball down to the seven, from where
halfback Dick Gregory went over, standing up. Soltau again con-
verted.
urdue Trips Hosrs
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.-(IP)-A couple of short runs by full-
back John Kerestes at the end of 95-yard marches brought Purdue
University a 14-6 victory over Indiana yesterday and kept the Old
Oaken Bucket in Lafayette.
Indiana finished the season without a Western Conference vic-
tory but end Clifton Anderson set two league records.
Anderson caught a pair of passes from Nick Sebek that un-
officially gave him 21 and 322 yards for six conference games.
Old records were -18 catches by Purdue's Bill Canfield in 1945
and 313 yards by Michigan's Dick Rifenburg in 1948.
WIlNdeatsUp -sert llini, 9-7
CHAMPAIGN, Ill.-(/)-The first field goal ever attempted by
senior quarterback Don Burson etched a thrilling 9-7 Northwestern
victory over favored Illinois before 67,872 Illini homecoming fans
yesterday.
Burson's 22-yard payoff boot, folowing a 57-yard punt return
by halfback Tom Worthington, came with only three minutes left
in the season finale for both Big Ten teams.
BURSON WAS a shining Northwestern hero in his last collegiate
game, also firing a second period touchdown pass to end Joe Zurav-
leff to give the Wildcats a 6-0 halftime lead.

("SU 1Mees-
(Continued from Page 1)
and it was his pass to Leo Ko-
ceski midway in the first period
which gave Michigan its only
score.
All-American candidate Dick
Kempthorn was a dynamo on de-
fense forMichigan. If one effort
could be considered better than
any other yesterday it was his
tackle of Ohio State's Jerry Krall
in the opening minutes of the sec-
ond half.
01H10 STATE had come on the
field looking like a new team. The
Buckeyes ripped through the Mich-
igan defense almost at will for the
FINAL STANDINGS

- California
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- () --
California's Bears thundered into
1949 football history and clinched
the right to represent the coast
conference in the Rose Bowl Janu-
ary 2 with a 33-14 victory yester-
day over the game but outclassed
Stanford Indians.
The 52nd annual gridiron
battle between the west's oldest
college rivals was witnessed by
an overflow crowd of more
than 90,000.
The victory was thoroughly
convincing. California hd the
power straight down -the middle,
with its clever quarterback, Bob
Celeri, at the helm.
The California line shattered
the Stanford forward wall and
made gaping holes for the back-
field men to tear through.
For the first time this season,
however, California was behind
at halftime. After scoring on a
55-yard touchdown pass to take
a 6-0 lead in the opening period,
the Bears suddenly found them-
selves behind by a point early in
the second quarter.
Stanford scored after recover-
ing a free ball on the California
16-yard line. Quarterback Gary
Kerkorian added the extra point,
which California's Jim Cullom had
been unable to do in the pre-

I

DO YOU KNOW . . . that 'Illi-
noi , broke the All-Conference
scoring record in Basketball dur-
ing the 1948-49 season.

W
MICHIGAN......4
Ohio State.......4
Minnesota .......4
Wisconsin .......3
Illinois ..........3
Iowa ............3
Northwestern ... .3
Purdue..........2
Indiana..........0

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I

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.: ROACH PRINTING,

DANCE
PROGRAMS
Tickets, Posters
Christmas Cards
24 Hr. Service

j

.<l

first three minutes of the period.
On Krall's play it looked like he
was going all the way, but Kemp-
thorn got him around the ankles
on Michigan's 31.
Charlie Lentz put an end to
Ohio State's drive, when he inter-
cepted a pass in the end zone.
This tied the Conference record
for interceptions, but Lentz
snatched another one later in
the game to give him seven for
the year to set a new mark.
Although Michigan is Confer-
ence champion for the third year
in a row, the fact that they tied
with Ohio State eliminated the
chance of setting a newrecordof
taking three undisputed titles in
succession.

-Daily-Wally Barth
TOUCHDOWN-Leo Koceski (18) shown catching the touch-
down pass from Wally Teninga in the first quarter of yesterday's
game. William Newell of Ohio State is trying to block the ball,
and Jim Hague (80) is in the background.

ceding period.

k 1

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

IT WAS OBVIOUS in the clos-
STS C ing minutes of the game that the
Buckeyes were more than happy
to settle for a tie, although they
did make a feeble field goal at-
ONG B OOKS about two minutes left to play.
The Wolverines took the ball
Son their own twenty and failed
in their attempts to move to-
wards pay dirt. Teninga's punt
rolled dead on Ohio State's 35,
and the Buckeyes took over with
3lankets $10.00 and up less than a minute to go.
Rather than take a chance on
having a pass interception go for a
ook Store Michigan touchdown the Buckeyes
ran two plays as time ran out, and
the game ended all tied up, 7-7.
*CHRISnTMAS
CARDS
An exceptional selection of
Regular, Assorted, or Personal
Cards.
"ON THE MEZZANINE"
at
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 S. University

4

(Continued from Page 5)
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memo-
rial Hall; Contemporary American
Painting, through Nov. 27, week-
days 9-5, Sundays 2-5. The public
is invited.
Events Today
Student Religious Groups:
Canterbury Club: 9 a.m., Holy
Communion followed by student
breakfast at Canterbury House. 5
p.m., Evening Services followed by
supper and meeting at 6 p.m. The
Rev. M. Hinsuke Yashiro, presid-
ing bishop of Japan, will speak on
"Christianity and the Future of
the Orient." Coffee hour, 8:30 p.m.
Westminster Guild: Seminar in
Religion, Presbyterian Church 9:30
a.m.; Mr. Henderson discussion
leader. Coffee and rolls 9 a.m.
Sunday evening fellowship supper,
5:30, followed by worship and
Thanksgiving Vespers, 6:30 p.m.
Lutheran Student Association:
7 p.m., Rev. William Nies, Mt.
Zion Lutheran Church, Detroit,
will speak on "Evangelism," Zion
Parish Hall.
Evangelical and Reformed Guild:
5:30 p.m., Supper. Speaker: Rev.
H. L. Pickerill.
Wesleyan Guild: 9:30 a.m., break-
fast.Seminar in Pine Room: "The
Intellectual Gospel." 5:30 p.m.,
Supper and Fellowship hour. 6:30'
p.m., Program: A Thanksgiving
Worship Service; special musical
arrangement and a Verse Choir.
Baptist Students: 10 a.m., Bible
Study Class. 6 p.m., Guild Meet-
ing and cost supper. Dr. Bennett
Weaver of the English Depart-
ment will be guest speaker.
Congregational Disciples Guild:
6 p.m., supper, Congregational
Church. Program on International
Friendship.
Unitarian Student Group: 3 p.m.,

League. Prof. John Shepard, "The
Psychology of Religion."
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club: Supper and program, 5:30
p.m. Report of delegate to last
week's National Gamma Delta
Convention at University of Min-
nesota.
Michigan Christian Fellowship:
Continuation in a series, "What
does the World's Best Seller Say?"
- "Has Man Any Hope?" Rev.
Howard Sugden, Ganson St. Bap-
tist Church, Jackson, speaker. 4:30
p.m., Lane Hall, Fireside Room.
Sigma Alpha Iota: Pledging at
the home of Mrs. Lucking, Barton
Hills. Actives meet at League, 7
p.m. Pledges meet at League, 7:30
p.m. Transportation provided.
Phi Iota Alpha presents BASES
FOR A DEMOCRATIC EDUCA-
TION IN LATIN AMERICA, a
round table discussion by five Lat-
in American students. Films: TO-
MORROW'S MEXICO and MEX-
ICO BUILDS A DEMORACY. 2
p.m., Union. Everybody welcome.
U. of M. Hostel Club: Scenic
hike and cookout in Stinchfield
Woods. Leave League at 2 p.m.
Bring own supper. Call Dorothy
Porter, 5077, for transportation.
Visit to Cranbrook Academy of
Art and Science Museum and hike
in Bloomfield Hills. Meet at Palm-
er Park car loop (Detroit) 9:30,
a.m. Bring lunch and cars.
IZFA: Hebrew Circle meeting,
11 a.m., Rm. 3N, Union.
Scalp and Blade: Buffalo and
Erie County Students: Meeting of
Scalp and Blade Fraternity, 7:30
p.m., Rm. 3A, Union.

bers and interested persons in-
vited.
La P'tite Causette: Mon., Nov.
21, Grill Room, League.
Cercle Francais. Meeting, Mon.,
Nov. 21, 8 p.m., League. Group
photo of members to be taken for
the Ensian. Faculty and members
invited.
Michigan Singers: Special re-
hearsal, Mon., Nov. 21, 4-5 p.m.,
Rm. B., Haven Hall.
Sociedad Hispanica: Social hour,
Mon., Nov. 21, 4-6 p.m., Interna-
tional Center. Refreshments.
Am. Inst. of Chem. Eng.: Tues.,
Nov. 22, 7:30 p.m., Terrace Room,
Union. Speaker, Prof. Joe Lee
Davis, "Pariodies of Fiction."
UWF: Membership meeting, on
Tues., Nov. 22, 7:30! p.m., League.
Bring dues.
Americans for Democratic Ac-
tion (ADA): Business meeting,
7:30 p.m., Tues., Nov. 22, Union.
Everybody invited. Short movie.
Inter-Arts Union: Meeting, 7:45
p.m., Mon., Nov. 21, League. Room
will be posted on the League bulle-
tin board.
Michigan Gothic Film Society:
Meeting, 8 p.m., Mon., Nov. 21,
Rackham Amphitheater. Two
films: "Variety" (German, 1925)
with Emil Jannings; and the ex-
perimental "Ghosts Before Break-
fast."
Institute of Public Administra-
tion: Films on administrative
management, 7 p.m., Mon., Nov.
21, East LectureiRoom, Rackham
Bldg. All Public Administration
students and interested persons
invited.
Phi Mu Alpha: Meeting, 7 p.m.,
Mon., Nov. 21, Union. 'Ensian pic-
ture will be taken. Program by
Emil Raab, violinist, and Digby
Bell, pianist.
Chess Players: Organization
meeting for a proposed U. of M.
Chess Club, 7:30 p.m., Mon., Nov.
21, Rm. 3R, Union. Chess will be
played.
Young Progressives of America:
Membership meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Mon., Nov. 21, Union. Delegates to
National Convention will be select-
ed. Plans for further action on ap-
plication blanks will be discussed.

I

1

I.

.4

Young
Rm. 3D,

Republicans:
Union.

3 p.m.,

Graduate Outing Club: Meet-
ing, 2:15 p.m., northwest entrance,
Rackham Bldg. Treasure hunt and
supper.
Coming Events
Student Leadership Training
Group: 7:30 p.m., Mon., Nov. 21,
Lane Hall.
American Society for Public Ad-
ministration: Social Seminar, on
Tues., Nov. 22, 7:30 p.m., West
Conference Room, Rackham. Mr.
Robert F. Steadman, comptroller,
Department of Administration, in
Lansing, will speak on state gov-
ernment in Michigan. All mem-

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