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November 19, 1949 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-19

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SATURDAY, NOVEMIEA 19, 1949

STHEMICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TEARE

v

f...

DOUBLE
by merle levin, sports co-editor

amok
W7

leets

Ohio

for

* Til

Bowl Bids Hinge on Results
Of Today's Top Grid Battles
Minnesota, Wisconsin, Stanford, California
Try for Post-Season Calls; Baylor on Spot

* * *

THE LAST OF THE FABULOUS Wisterts bows out of the Michi-
gan sports picture today, writing 'finis' to an unparalleled chapter in
Wolverine sports history that has been 18 years in the making.
Not since the Poes of Princeton placed three brothers on All-
American squads back at the end of the last century has there
been anything comparable to the feats of Francis, Albert and Alvin
Wistert.
Their accomplishments read like a chapter from Frank Merriwell.
Francis, known more familiarly as "Whitey," played tackle on
Michigan's undefeated squads of 1932 and 1933 and was such a capable
passer that he was often dropped back into the backfield to throw.
When Wolverine coach Harry Kipke ran short of ends, Wistert was
shifted into the wing slot temporarily. He played enough tackle, how-
ever, to earn himself an All-American berth in 1933.
Albert never played high school fgotball on "Whitey's" ad-
vice, but he found himself at a starting tackle position for the
Maize and Blue at the beginning of his soph-emore year in 1940 His
play that year earned him All-Conference mention but he tailed off
sharply the following season and they began to wonder if "The
Ox" was a flash in the pan. He answered that question most sat-
isfactorily in 1942 by walking off with All-American honors and
the title of Most Valuable Player on the Michigan squad.
The story of Alvin Wistert was saved for last and just as the old
adage said, last was best of all the rest.
* * *
ALVIN, LIKE Albert never played high school football. (He made
a stab at it but he couldn't make the varsity.) When he came to Michi-
gan after four years in the Marines, a year at Boston University and
several years as a salesman in Chicago, younger brother Albert was an
established star in professional football and Alvin was a ripe 31.
Playing against men 10 and 12 years his junior, Alvin proceded
to outstrip both Francis and Albert by earning an All-American
tackle berth in his junior year and then climaxed the list of Wis-
tert achievements by being named to captain the 1949 squad.
Thus in nine years of football at Michigan the Wisterts have
earned All-American recognition three times (with a possibility of a
fourth) and have also earned one 'Most Valuable' award and a* cap-
taincy.
DURING THEIR TENURE at Michigan the Wolverines have won
68 games (including a Rose Bowl victory) while losing eight and, tying
three. At the same time the Wolverines were winning four Confer-
ence championships and tying Purdue and Northwestern for a fifth.
If you are one of the 97,239 fans who will jam Michigan Sta-
dium today to see the Wolverines battle Ohio State in an effort to
become the first team in Western Conference history to annex
three consecutive undisputed titles, take a good look at the num-
ber '11' which emblazons the generous chest of Alvin Wistert.
It may be the last chance you'll have to see it anywhere outside of a
glass case.
That number has identified three All-Americans named Wistert.
If Michigan officials don't see fit to place it in retirement along with
Bennie Ooesterbaan's '47' and Tom Harmon's '98', it will be as good a
case of gross negligence as any lawyer Francis Wistert has come across
in his prosperous New York office.

Wolverines' Defense Seeks
To Brake Buckeves' Backs
(Continued from Page 1)
If Ohio State triumphs not only will they take the crown away!
from Michigan, but will receive the bid to participate in the Rose Bowl!
New Year's Day.
* * * *
MOST OF THE men who try a hand at calling the winner before
the game takes place pick Michigan by six-and-a-half points. Et
sounds pretty good, but in a traditional battle such as this one, it's nciL
safe to give either team anything, especially this year.
The teams are quite a bit closer than six-and-a-half points.
One expert, who rates the teams on a scaling trigger point system
of his own, gives Michigan a total of 102.7 and Ohio State 101.1.
When it gets that close it's going to be the team with the spirit ard
determination that will wind up on top.
AN AIR of "This is it" hange over the Wolverine camp. Dead s E-
riousness and an awareness of what is at stake in this afternoon's co ri-
test is evidenced by every Michigan gridder. If there was ever a gai ne

By The Associated Press
CHICAGO While Michigan
and Ohio State are fighting it out
for the Western Conference title
at Ann Arbor today, Minnesota's
Gophers will play host to the
Badgers of Wisconsin in a game
that could well decide the Big
Ten's representative in the Rose
Bowl game.
* * *
REGARDLESS of the Ohio-
Michigan outcome, Minnesota can-
not squeeze into the title picture,
but the Gophers-with a win over
Wisconsin coupled with an Ohio
loss-could finish tied with the
Buckeyes for second and stake an
almost certain bowl trip claim.
Minnesota whipped Ohio, 27-0,
midway in the season.
Minnesota,boomed a sure-fire
bowl prospect until the Gophers
succumbed to Michigan and
Purdue, rates a two-touchdown
favorite over Wisconsin in their
Minneapolis showdown which
will be witnessed by an overflow
67,000.
Out on the West Coast, at Palo
alto, 90,000 will turn out to see
California's power-laden Golden
Bears try to crush Stanford for
their 10th straight victory and
qualify as the host team in the
daddy of all the bowl contests at
Pasadena.
NOTRE DAME, the old mon-
arch of the college tribes, faces an
apparent breather against Iowa at
South Bend, while the muscular
Oklahoma Sooners, No. 2 in the

Associated Press National Poll, are
favored to rack up their 19th
straight win over Santa Clara at
Norman. Unbeaten Army rests up
in preparation for its annual clas-
sic with Navy next week at Phila-
delphia.
The Rice Owls, winners of
four straight in the tough
Southwest Conference, are fa-
vored to make it five at the ex-
pense of Texas Christian Uni-
versity at Fort Worth and to
clinch at least a tie for the con-
ference crown.
Baylor, the only other contender
with a 3-1 conference record, faces-
extinction if it loses to Southern
Methodist at Dallas, as the ex-
perts think it likely will. The
southwest champion automatical-
ly plays in the Cotton Bowl, may-
be against Oklahoma.
From all accounts, scouts from
other bowls, including the Sugar
and Orange, will help boost at-
tendance at the clash between un-
beaten Virginia and once-beaten
Tulane at Charlottesville.

JERRY KRALL
Buckeyes' speedster
Line-ups:

for Michigan to win, "This is it."
The old adage, "The best de-
fense is a good offense," will be
put to a severe test this after-
noon. Ohio State ranks first in
Conference statistics in the of-
fensive department, while Mich-
igan holds the top spot in de-
fense.
Ohio State has averaged 24.2
points per game and piled up ar
average of 351 yards in each con-
test so far this season. The Buck-
eyes also lead the Conference in
total passing with 163.2 yards per
game.

to be the deciding factor in to-
day's contest.
Michigan is not expected to be
at full strength for the game. Eid
Bob Hollway and guard Al Jac k-
son are not likely to see action
against the Buckeyes.

FRED MORRISON
... provides power

1

OSU Pos.
C. Gilbert LE
Dick O'Hanlon LT
George Toneff LG
Jack Lininger C
John Blitz R G
Jack Wilson R T
James Hague RE
Pandel Savic QB
Jerry Krall LH
Ray Hamilton RH
Vic Janowicz FB

MICH.
Harry Allis
Tom Johnson
L. Heneveld
Bob Erben
D. McClelland
Jim Atchison
1. Wisniewski
John Ghindia
C. Ortmann
Leo Koceski
Don Dufek

ROUND THE CLOCK:.
MXClelland Takes Role
Of 'MV' Sixty Minute Man

ORPHEUM

A~tic1i~vznZ now~
SPOUTS
BILL BRENTON, Night Editor

Pucksters Without Practice Place
Until Old Coliseum Gets New Look

, 1

Dear Boss:t
I think an apology is in order.,
FOR TWO WEEKS now, you've
been putting me on the carpet for
not seeing Coach Vic Heyliger
about his 1949-50 hockey team.
Even though I've made every pos-
sible excuse, you never have be-
lieved my sorry plight. Well yes-r
terday I decided to do something
about the situation.
I actually went -down to see
Coach Heyliger, and guess what?
The hockey squad hasn't even
started to practice yet. In fact,
they don't even have a rink!
Whose face is red now?
Remember how cold and cloudy
the rink used to be last year and
how wet we'd all get from the
leaky roof? Not to mention the
ease with which thousands of en-1
thusiastic fans could squeeze into]
the ancient structure.
** *
ALL THAT is being changed
now. The athletic funds were

tapped for $200,000. and an entire
reconstruction job was started lash
September 1 on the old rink to
turn it into a modern hockey
arena. Although the old rink had
only been in use 27 years, not-
withstanding the years it had pre-
viously been an amusement build-
ing, the powers-to-be decided a
change was needed.
About the only thing that
hasn't been changed in the old
building is the original site.
Outside of that, a completely
new shell is being built, com-
plete with dressing rooms and
enough seating capacity for
4000. A far cry over the former
capacity for a scant 1000.
To insure the spectator's com-
fort, a two inch gypsum roof is
being constructed that will be the
latest in top-notch weatherproof-
ing and insulation. A new light-
ing arrangement is being installed
and for the first time, the building
will have a heating unit.

OF COURSE, the gimmick to
the whole venture has been the
unavoidable delays that have been
encountered, thus preventing the
team from being on ice to date.
Normally, November 1 is the
scheduled date for hockey prac-
tice to begin. (I'm not so far be-
hind times after all!)
Although the whole front end,
part of the roof and most of the
interior work is still under con-
struction, Coach Heyliger figures
that the team may be on ice right
after Thanksgiving. Brine is now
being pumped through the cool-
ing system to iron out the kinks
and help locate leaks in the pipes.
IF ALL GOES right, sand pack-
ing may start the first of next
week. This builds the foundation
upon which ice can be formed.
Outside of this, boss, that's
about all. Oh, student tickets will
still be sixty cents for all home
games.
Your energetic scribe,
Vokac

* * *
AT THE SAME TIME, however,
the Wolverines pace the Big Nine
in defense-as they have the past
three years-having yielded only
an average of 220 yards in each1
game.f
The Buckeyes possess a ver-
satile passing attack, spearhead-
ed by quarterback Pandel Savic,
which shows a completion per-
centage of .473 as compared to
.317 for their opponents.
On the receiving end of Savic's
tosses are two towering ends, Dickt
Schnittker and Ralph Armstrong,
both capable of lugging the ballj
after the catch.
IN THE GROUND side of the
Buckeye attack are five break-
away backs, Jerry Krall, Ray Ham-
ilton, Jimmy Clark, Vic Janowicz
and Fred Morrison. They all pos-
sess plenty of speed and shiftiness
and will give the Wolverine de-
fenders trouble this afternoon.
Michigan's attack is bolstered
by the return of right half, Leo
Koceski. He should add both a
running and pass receiving
threat to the Wolverine attackl
which has been lacking in the+
latter department of late.
The Maize and Blue offense will
be spearheaded by the versatile
Charlie Ortmann. His passing and
running have sparked many a
Wolverine drive and he may prove
Scribes Vote
Player Honor
To Robin"son
NEW YORK - (P) - Jackie
Robinson, second baseman for
the pennant-winning Brooklyn
Dodgers, was chosen yesterday by
the Baseball Writers' Association
of America as thebNational
League's Most Valuable Player
for 1949.
"It was quite a thrill to get the
news," Robinson said. "In fact,
it was my second biggest of the
year. The first was the day we'
clinched the pennant."
The 30-year-old Negro, first
of his race to reach stardom in
major league baseball, easily
won the annual award. He re-
ceived 12 first place votes out
of a possible 24.

By JOHN BARBOUR
In the fast, hard brand of foot-
ball that today's colleges dish out,
60 minutes is a long time.
Until the cold afternoon of
November 5 not one Michigan
Wolverine had remained on the
field for the full period of play.
THEN FROM the initial kick-
off against Purdue to the last
play of that Saturday afternoon,
guard Don McClelland became the
first 60-minute Wolverine since
Pete Elliott.
It marked a climax of persis-
tence and work by McClelland.
For the two years of '47 and '48
he had been understudying such
Michigan greats as Q u en t
Sickles, Stu Wilkins, and Dom
Tomasi.
In 1948, his second year of var-
sity competition and his second
season of winning a letter, he had
played bit roles in Michigan wins
over Purdue, Northwestern, Navy,
Indiana, and Ohio State.

Calumet High School went to
Notre Dame, where another
Calumet boy, George Gipp, had
gone long before.
The Ohio State game will be the
last appearance of Don McClelland
in a Michigan uniform. It will also
get him his third Varsity letter in
football.
Climate, Diet
WorryMSC'
TUCSON, Ariz.-(AP)-The dras-
tic change in climate conditions
is causing Michigan State Coach
Biggie Munn some worries prior to
the Spartans' final game with Uni-
versity of Arizona tonight.-
Munn has warned his players
against drinking too much water.
He's afraid thirst caused by the
dry climate might cause them to
become logy.
The coaches also are trying to
cut down on the huge helpings of
food the team has been taking
Correction
Adams House won the
championship in volleyball
league D, not Hayden House,
as was erroneously reported
in yesterday's Daily.

Cinema Triumphs
From All The World
TODAY
and SUNDAY!
In Answer,
To Your
Many Requests
DANNY VIRGINIA
KAYE -MAYO
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withBORIS KARLOFF
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Is

Continuous from 1:30 P.M.

THIS YEAR Don has
switching between the two
positions with regulars Al
son and Lloyd Heneveld.

been
guard
Jack-

Continuous from 1 P.M.

Besides that this is the last
season of eligibility for the 21-
year-old senior. He will get a
degree in Mechanical Engineer-
ing when he graduates in Febru-
1_9K

ary,1a7.
But he plans on r
next June to enter M
school, from which
graduated in, 1915.
* *
HIS FOOTBALL c
at Calumet High
Michigan where he p
through the football
switched to basketbal
ter.
Most of the gradt

'eturning the during the last week. At Arrow-
[ichigan Law head Springs, Calif., the squad had
his father freedom of choice from an elab-
orate menu. The players made the
* most of it and all added weight.
areer started Some concern also is professed
in Northern by the coaches over the way the
layed center, team will perform under lights.
season, and The passers and receivers had
1 in the win- some trouble gauging the throws
under artificial lights in the first
uates of the night practice session last night.

.1

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Anouncing.. .
Two New Luncheon Features
ory at only 39c

I4

W-Iik 'Ii r
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- Also -
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Eastside Kids

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
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Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Phi Sigma Delta fraternity pin.
Vicinity of Mosher or League, Sat.
night. Initialed B. L. May force me
into bachelorhood. Reward. Berton
London, 4211. ._)80L
MEN'S CHECKE.D trousers on Hill.
Lincoln, or Forest, Thurs. a.m. Call
6470 after 7:00. )83L
OST-Cosmetic (black) bag with
change purse and "old faithful"
fountain pen, etc. Thurs, 6-6:30 p.m.
from Rm. 209 AH to middle of line
in Mich. League. Ph 9371. )85L
LOST---Key case on North University
Ave. near Forest Ave. Call 31511, ex.

BUSINESS SERVICES
SHIRTS-Nine hour service (by re-
quest), three day service (regular ser-
vice). Ace Laundry, 1116 S. Univer-
sity. ) 21B
EFFCIENT, EXPERT, PROMPT Type-
writer Repair Service. Mosely's Type-
writer and Supply Company. 214 E.
Washington. Phone 5888. )5B
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
Van-Doren Clarinet Reeds
Box of 25 - $4.50
New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washington )4B
HAVE YOUR TYPEWRITER REPAIRED
by the Office Equipment Service Com-
pany, 215 E. Liberty. )16B
WASHING and/or ironing done in my
own home. Free pick-up and delivery.
Phone 2-9020. )1B
NEARLY NEW SHOP - Fur or cloth
coats, formals, suits, dresses. 109%12 E.
washington, over Dietzel's. Phone
2-4669. )27B
GREETING CARDS inscribed in colors,
10c each or $1.00 per box. J. A. Early,
402 Observatory, Phone 2-8606. )8B
UNWANTED HAIR removed forever.
SHORT WAVE method, guaranteed
results. Marie's Beauty Shoppe. Phone
2-6696. 5 Nickels Arcade. )12B
PHOTO-ENGRAVING
24-hour service at Reasonable Charges
On High Quality Engraving
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard
Notice the S.L. Candidates' Posters

FOR SALE
CONTAX C-III. Sonnar F-2 coated.
Meter and camera in good working
condition. Purchased 1945, $350.00.
Asking $200.00. Call 2-8762 evenings.
)83
FOR SALE-Man's brown gabardine
coat. Practically new. Size 42. Fur
collar and lining. Half cost. Phone
2-9552. )82
ESQUIRE JAZZ RECORD BOOKS for
'45 & '46,$withemany old photos.
Regularly $2.00 each. My price only
49c each. BOB MARSHALL'S BASE-
MENT BOOK SHOP, 211 S. State.
(Lots of good used books too.) )77
1937 PLYMOUTH Coupe in good run-
ning condition. Price $85. Ph. 4962. )81
SKIRTS-Our 100% wool skirts start at
$5.95. Assorted 'G'"'"o and colors.
Cousins
on S e otreet
BICYCLE: Firestone Deluxe. Cost $53.00.
Used three weeks, sell for $35.00. May
be seen at Manausa Motors on 4th
Ave. ) 75
ALL COLORS Baby Parakeets and Ca-
naries. Bird supplies and cages. 562
S. Seventh. Ph. 5330. )2B
SAVE MONEY-Gabardine pants, $4.95.
Michigan sweat shirts, $1.95. Navy
"T" Shirts, 45c. All wool sweat socks,
49c. U.S. Navy-Army type oxfords,
$6.88. Open until 6:00 p.m. SAM'S
STORE, 122 E. Washington.

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STEVENS*GRAY
RORY CALHOUN
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