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November 15, 1949 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1949

NEHRU'S IN-LAW:
India's Economic Policy
Ill Conceived-Hutheesing

By EVA SIMON
Loose thinking and lack of
planning characterize the Indian
government's economic policy,
according to Prime Minister Pan-
dit Nehru's brother-in-law, Raja
Hutheesing.
Hutheesing and his wife, Neh-
ru's younger sister, spoke infor-
mally to 50 Indian students here
Sunday. They are on a lecture
tour of the United States.
* * *
HUTHESSING criticized the In-
dian government for wasting for-
eign exchange on consumer goods
instead of spending it on ma-
chines for long range improve-
ments.
He said India has "tremen-
dous resources that are going to
waste."
Huthessing started a Bombay
newspaper,the "Evening Star,"
to protest against, the one-party
system in India. The paper is aim-
ed at "constructive criticism" of
the government.
HUTHESSING reiterated Neh-
ru's statement of four weeks ago
that India would not commit her-
self to either side in the East-
West struggle.
He said that if India were to
ally herself with the West, she
would have to judge issues "not
from the way they would af-
fect the ultimate goal of world
peace, but -from how they r
would affect a future conflict
with Russia."
"However, we hold ideas of
freedom keenly and perhaps sen-
timentally because of the years
we suffered under a totalitarian,
regime," he pointed out. "There-

fore we find ourseves with clos-
er ties to western democracy."
* * *
HUTHESSING advocated paci-<
fism as the road to world peace.
"The greatest contribution1
India can leave the world is
the idea that if we have the
right means, we will achieve our1
ends," he said.l
Although he praised the World
Federalists for their "great ideal-
ism" he criticized them for being
"not pacifists, but active oppon-
ents of war."
The new constitution of India1
has a section permitting her to
join a federal world government.
U Press Club
Elects White
To Presidency
Ink White, of St. Johns Michi-
gan, editor of the Clinton County
Republican News, was elected
president of the University Press
Club at the final session of the
club's three day annual meeting
Saturday.
White is also a member of the
University Board in Control of
Student Publications. He will suc-
ceed Otto C. Pressprich, editor of
the Saginaw News, as president of
the Press Club.
E. C. Hayhow, editor of the
Hillsdale News, was moved up
from second to first vice-presi-
ident and his former office was
taken over by Glenn A. Mac-
Donald, editor of the Bay City
Times.
Arthur L. Brandon, University
relations counselor, was re-elected
secretary treasurer of the club.
In addition, another resolution
commending the University De-
partment of Journalism for its
progress was passed and memoirs
for the late Chase Osborn, former
governor of Michigan, and George
G. Booth, former president and
chairman of the board for the
Booth Newspapers, were approved.
dT
Today's
Pro grams
FORUM - 8:30 p.m., WHRV,
"America's Town Meeting";
What Should be the True Lib-
eral Program." Senator Paul H.
Douglas, Rep. John Davis Lodge,
Philip Willkie, Dore Schary.
DRAMA-8 p.m. WHRV, WUOM
Angell Hall Playhouse"; The
End of the Japanese Empire" by
Al Slote.
COMEDY-8:30 p.m., WWJ, Baby
Snooks Show
9 p.m. WWJ Bob Hope.
9:30 p.m. WWJ Fibber McGee
and Molly.
To Discuss Use
Of Chloromycein
Dr. E. H. Payne, of Parke-Davis,
will discuss the first cases treated
with chloromycetin and present a
movie at a joint meeting of the In-
ternational Students Association
and the Pre-Medical Society at 8
p.m. today in Rm. 1200, Old Chem-
istry Building.

Council for
UNESCO
Established
Michigan Council for UNESCO
was established by the adoption of
a set of by-laws at a meeting held
Saturday in the Union Building at
Michigan State College.
The organization is one of the
specialized agencies of the United
Nations, according to Prof. Wil-
liam Clark Trow, of the School of
Education, who was elected presi-
dent of the group.
* ** *
PURPOSE OF THE Council is
the promotion of the objectives of
the international UNESCO organ-
ization which are designed prin-
cipally to develop understanding
among nations and other cultural
groups.
Other officers elected include
Ella A. Hawkinson, of Hope
College, vice-president; Loraine
Shepard, of Michigan State Col-
lege, secretary; and Edith
Gonne of the Detroit Public
Schools, treasurer.
Three members at large of the
executive board were also selected.
* * *
THEY ARE Stanley Cain, of the
Cranbook Institute of Science,
Barney Hopkins, of the Michigan
CIO Council, and Osmand Kelly,
postmaster and former mayor of
Flint.
The names of other members
of the executive board, who will
serve as chairmen of the various
standing committees, will be an-
nounced later.
The meeting was attended by
representatives of the state's
schools, colleges and universities
and by representatives of a num-
ber of citizen's groups.
I RC To Debate
Aid To Asian
DemocraCtes
"Should the U.S. Extend Aid to
Democratic Countries in the Far
East," will be the question dis-
cussed by the International Relat-
tions Club at 7:30 p.m. Thursday
in Rm. 3D of the Union.
Students with a genuine inter-
est in the international field will
be welcome to attend the open
meeting, according to Maryann
Harris, publicity chairman.
Formerly, membership in the
club was limited to 20 people. An
attempt is now being made to in-
crease the number of active par-
ticipants.
"It is not necessary for a stu-
dent to be a political science ma-
jor to join in the club's activi-
ties," Miss Harris said.
Sponsored by the Carnegie
Foundation, the club is designed
to organize study groups in vari-
ous fields of international rela-
tions.

Lit Students
To Contact
A dvisers
Literary college students who

-Daily-Ed Kozma
WEATHER BUREAU - These weather recording devices are
mounted on a scaffold thirty feet above the roof of the Natural
Science Bldg. Dr. John Chronic, director of the weather obser-
vation station, is adjusting a wind vane. In the foreground is a
wind velocity tester.
* * * *
Meteorologists Operate
Co-op Weather Bureau

plan to enter their concentration
program next semester should
make appointments with their new
advisers within the next two weeks,
according to Prof. Lionel Laing,
chairman of the Board of Concen-
tration Advisers.
Appointments may be made at
the Board's newly-established of-
fice in Rm. 1006, Angell Hall.
* * *
PROF. LAING pointed out that
students who will have completed
55 credit hours by the end of this
semester are expected to select a
field of concentration and to dis-
cuss their tentative program with
their concentration advisers.
Students who are undecided
about their field of concentra-
tion should make an appoint-
ment with Prof. Laing, who will
discuss their problem with them.
Prof. Laing explained the early
scheduling of appointments as be-
ing necessary to a program of ade-
quate counseling.
* * *
"BESIDES insuring the adviser
sufficient time for a closer exami-
nation of individual aims and
needs," Prof. Laing explained, "it
will allow time for the establish-
ment of a more personal relation-
ship between student and adviser."
As the counseling continues
during the semester, election
cards will be filled out and tabu-
lated before registration. These
totals will help the college to
make provision in advance for
the number of students desiring
any given course.
The upper-class counseling sys-
tem, with its centralized Angell
Hall offices, is in its first semester
of operation. It replaced a decen-
tralized system in which advisers
worked independently in each de-
partment.

TOO MUCH CONTROL?
'U' Paternalism Topic Of
Speech Assembly Discussion

"Is the University Too Pater-
nalistic?" will be the topic of a
student discussion at the monthly
Speech Assembly, 4 p.m. tomorrow
in Rackham Lecture Hall.
Four speech students will pre-
sent arguments for and against
University interference in non-
academic activities. Especially
under consideration will be the
liquor, driving and speakers bans
and women's hours.
* * *
THE DISCUSSION will not be
concerned with curricular matters
such as graduation and concen-
tration requirements, according
to Edd Miller, speech department
director of forensics.

'50, Gordon MacDougall, '52, and
Leonard Whittlinger, '50.
A period of audience participa-
tion will follow the discussion.
The Assembly is open to the pub-
lic.

r

1

What a Spot
For Christmas
Shopping!
"STORYLAND and
TOYTOWN" on
FOLLETT'S
2nd Floor - State at North U.

PO

The roof of the Natural Science
building is headquarters for a
group of meteorologists who op-
erate a weather bureau coopera-
tive observation station.
Though the station has remain-
ed unnoticed by most students, it
has been in continuous operation
at its present location for about
10 years.
FUNCTIONING as a coopera-
tive station, the university weath-
er men do not gather data for of-
ficial predictions-but only for
climatic records.
However, their services are
often called for by local news-
papers, oil companies, and oth-
ers interested in the weather.
The director of the weather sta-
tion is Dr. John Chronic of the
geology department, who is suc-
ceeding Richard Strong, Grad.,
Rebuilt Colliseum
To Welcome Fans
A newly rebuilt University Col-
iseum will greet hockey spectators
this winter, with completion
scheduled for December 1.
The remodeling, which includes
expanding the present seating ca-
pacity from 1,200 to 4,000, will be
ready for the first game, according
to Director H. O. (Fritz) Crisler.
Enlarged at a cost of $200,000,
the addition should help alleviate
the scramble for seats that has oc-
curred in previous games.

A

the director for the past
years.
* * *

three(

THESE MEN and their assist-
ants make records of weather.
data twice daily, and periodically
this information is submitted to
the U. S. weather station at East
Lansing.
Equipmen used for gathering
this data was obtained from the
government and from the uni-
versity owned Willow Run air-
port..
Some new pieces of equipment
have just been received and in-
stallation is being completed.
* * *
NOW UNDER the geology de-
partment, the weather station has
in past years been under the phy-
sics and the astronomy depart-
ments.

Y its superb writing ease
V its 14 amazing new features
its streamlined beauty
NEW W_
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A PEN LIKE ITI
It's the best investment
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success. New "51" promises
writing perfection ... with many
outstanding new features. Remem-
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8 colors. Pens, $13.50 up Sets, 19.75 up
CHOOSE YOURS NOW AT
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R DE LIBERTY
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THE PEN HOSPITAL
Also PARKER "21" at $5.00, Set $8.75

THE NEW SYSTEM provides
for the centralization of all coun-
seling activities, giving advisers
access to the newest developments
in the programs of other depart-
ments.

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PO poeced"┬░Zps he nw P si
~~~7~~~I~ ngOP u alr
tiOor f !NJECi

Active in national 4H Club work while in
college, he helped organize its statewide
activities, won a national 4H champion-
ship in Public Speaking. In 1940 he re-
ceived his BS degree in engineering.

A month later he began navigator train-
ing as an Aviation Cadet. In 1941, he
received his navigator's wings and a
commission as Second Lieutenant . .
married his college sweetheart.

A native of Grove, Oklahoma, Norman
Hays graduated from Grove High School
in 1935. The following year he entered
Oklahoma A&M, where he majored in
engineering; also took public speaking.

____________________________________________

r - . a r
Sent to an RAF Navigation School in
Canada, he graduated with the highest
possible rating of Specialist. Norman
served overseas for 18 months in the
Aleutians, Italy and Saipan.

~-~--
Accepting a regular commission after
the war, he was assigned to development
of navigation instruments; navigated the
B-29 "Pacusan Dreamboat" on its famed
Hawaii-Cairo non-stop flight in 1946..

.
-4. 4

~t,

Irp,
A;j

Typical of college graduates who have
found their place in the U. S. Air Force,
Major Hays is Chief, Navigation Section,
at Headquarters in Washington ... with
a secure career . . . a promising future.

____________________a

II

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