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November 12, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TlE MICHIGAN DAILY

9 sx

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1949

SWITCH TO POSTUM:'
'Daily' Survey Indicates
Coffee Prices Will Soar

\ \. .... ENGINEERS CLEAN UP:
kP

By DON KOTITE
Enjoy that five-cent cup of cof-
fee while you can, chum-the high
cost of living has caught up with
hot java, too.
Fast-climbing green coffee bean
prices will soon induce many 10-
cal restaurant managers to charge
more for that midnight picker-
upper, a Daily survey discovered
yesterday.
* * *
POPULAR BRANDS of vacuum-
packed coffee may be selling for
close to 80 cents a pound in a
couple of weeks, the Associated
Press has reported.
And nationwide roasters have
indicated their selling prices are
still far behind what they'll
'U' Geologist
Tells About
Odd Glaciers
A land where mountain glaciers
descend into extremely dry des-
erts was described yesterday by Dr.
John Clark of the geology depart-
ment.
Addressing a meeting of the Ge-
ological Society of America in El
Paso, Texas, Clark said this nat-
ural phenomenon in central Asia
seems to be the only place in the
world where this occurs. Moun-
tain glaciers in this area have
melted back very little since the
ice age, he pointed out.
SPONSORED by the Central Asi-
atic Foundation and the board of
foreign missions of the Methodist
Church, Clark returned last Au-
gust from a one year expedition
into mountain areas of Pakistan
and Western China.
He covered four principal
mountain ranges - Himalaya,
Karakoram, Kuenlun and Pa-
mir. The Karakoram he de-
scribed as "a string of 25,000
foot peaks one right after the
other."
"There is practically no rain
fall in the mountains so erosion is
mostly by gravity," Clark said.
"This means that travel in the
mountains is a run from one large
rock to another to avoid the almost
continuous shower of rocks, boul-
ders and land slides-that's ero-
sior*y.┬░gravity.,
"Pack horses that live through
the first hail of rocks learn fast
and develop into pretty smart
animals," he added.
Law Exams
Tell Aptitude
Princeton Tests Used
By LeadingSchools
Law School Admission Tests are
designed to determine the basic
aptitude of an individual to study
law, according to Prof. Russell A.
Smith of the Law School.
The examinations are worked
out by a group of leading law
schools in conjunction with the
College Entrance Board of Prince-
ton University, he said.
* * *
"PREPARED and actually ad-
ministered by the Educational
Testing Service of Princeton, the
examination is required for ad-
mission bymost of the law schools
in the country."
"It is given about four times
a year at approximately 100 ex-
amination centers throughout
the nation," he continued.
"Ann Arbor serves as one of

these centers."
Examinations are returned to
the Princeton Educational Test-
ing Service for scoring and the
results are sent to the school or
schools designated by the appli-
cant, Prof. Smith said.
"EACH SCHOOL then deter-
mines how much weight should be
attached to the examination for
admission purposes," he added.
"The tests have only been in
existence a few years and as
yet it is impossible to properly
determine their value."
Candidates taking the Law
School Admission Test today are
required to report to 100 Hutchins
Hall at 8:45 a.rn. for the morning
session and at 1:45 p.m. for the af-
ternoon session, according to Prof.
Smith. ______
Not by G.B.S.
Pygmalion did not bring Galatea
to life but prayed to the goddess
Aphrodite who did so.
IG ,,,,,... ......

have to pay to replace their in-
ventories.'
One campus restauranteur noted
he has paid 25 per cent more for
wholesale coffee in the last month.
Now charging a nickel, with or
without cream, he plans to raise
prices to seven cents "in about a
xeek."
* * *
CITING A RECENT Article from
the "Wall Street Journal," he said
.wo factors have caused present
coffee supplies to dwindle-"More
is going to Europe than ever be-
fore and coffee consumption here
has hit its peak," he explained.
Explaining that coffee per
pound jumped three cents last
week (from 70 to 73 cents), an-
other coffee shop owner said she
"wouldn't be at all surprised" if
she has to bill her customers a
dime soon, instead of her pres-
ent seven-cent charge.
She also pointed out that her
coffee cream orders went up sev-
eral cents last week.
* * *
A DRUGSTORE proprietor
claimed his coffee supplier has
warned him to look out for a ten-
cent per pound jump in two weeks.
On that basis, coffee there
will soon cost seven cents a cup,
but will remain a nickel when
ordered with a meal, he added.
A brighter note was injected by
a campus dime store's soda foun-
tain manager. "A nickel is all we
charge and all we'll continue to
charge-for a while, anyway," she
said.
ANOTHER RESTAURANT boss
reached the same conclusion. "I
won't raise prices until things get
so bad that I can't possibly afford
my current charge," he asserted.
German Legal
Group To Visit
Law School
A group of German lawyers will
be the guests of the Law School
for three days beginning tomor-
row.
The Office of Military Govern-
ment in Germany has arranged
for two women and 13 men to
make the visit. The group includes
law professors, judges and attor-
neys.
TOMORROW night the lawyers
will meet at the International
Center to discuss the promotion
of American-German educational
exchange.
Monday morning the group
will tour the Law School and li-
brary. They will meet with the
Ann Arbor Bar Association Mon-
day afternoon. A campus tour
and a meeting with the Lawyers
Club will conclude the visit
Tuesday.
The group will be in this coun-
try for six months. Five of the
lawyers will remain an additional
four months to take up residence
at American law schools.
SRA To Hear
Prof. Coleman
Prof. John Coleman, of the
University of Toronto, will be the
guest speaker at the Student Re-
ligious Association's Saturday
Luncheon Discussion at 11:30 a.m.
today in Lane Hall.
Formerly secretary of the W'rld
Student Christian Federation,
Prof. Coleman traveled through-

out the world for two years. He
will discuss "The Religious Person
in a Modern University."
The luncheon is open to the gen-
eral public, but SRA officials re-
quested that those desiring to at-
tend the luncheon call Lane Hall
this morning for reservations.
Milk for Horsehair
A new substitute for horsehair
has been developed from skim
milk.

Triangles f
By ED LANNING
Today the Engineering Arch is
clean.
Yesterday 11 cigar-smoking,
dunce-capped Triangle initiates
gave it a vigorous scrubbing with
soap and water-and toothbrushes.
The cleaning-up came as the cli-
max of a hectic initiation.
* * *
THE PROSPECTIVE members
of the engineering junior honor
society assembled at 11:30 a.m. on
the corner of South and East Uni-
versity Streets. Equipment for the
adventure was roller skates,
toothbrushes, pails of water, cig-
ars, dunce caps and, of course,
paddles.

length of the diagonal at break-
neck speed.
The return trip to the Engi-
neering Arch was an experiment
in methods of locomotion. The 11
men crawled the distance, on
hands and knees, holding the an-
kles of the man ahead, even rest-
ing their feet on the shoulders of
the man. behind. Initiates were
spurred on by paddles in the hands
of actives.
THE SCRUBBING of the Arch
began at 11:55. Wearing dunce
caps that sported Triangle em-
blems and smoking long, fat cig-
ars, the initiates went down on
their knees to take off layers of
dirt deposited by the shoes of
thousands of students.
The task was made doubly
difficult by the fact that it was
done during the noon rush hour,

'erform Toothbrush Rites

when streams of men and wom-
en were pouring through the
Arch.
The 11 men, tapped last Tues-
day night, will be formally initiat-
ed at 2:30 p.m. today at the Un-
ion.
Next Friday Night!
Dance to Harberd
BANKRUPTCY
BALL
League --
VERY informal

JOURNALISM FELLOWS-Four foreign students who are stud
Press Club fellowship plan were introduced to members at a lunc
Stace, editor of the Ann Arbor News shakes hands with Hanns
Padel, of Zurich; Alvise Barison, of Trieste (left) and Rudolf Sou
Newsmen esponsible
For Security--Rep._Ford

-Daily--Lmanlan

ying here under the University At 11:45, under the watchful
heon meeting yesterday. Arthur eyes of old Triangle men, the
Stempf, of Munich. Gerd 11. workout began. First, the un-
acek (right) look on. fortunate initiates skated the
We now have a large stock of
IMPORTED and DOMESTIC
CHRISTMAS CARDS
and IMPORTED SILK SCARFS AND TIES
Come in and browse around.
THE INDIA ART SHOP
0 330 Maynard Street
--o<-o -o -o <--Gyo<--o<--o<--y<-- <-yo<-- o<-y

Asserting that legislators must
be bound by the will of the people,
Congressman Gerald R. Ford yes-
terday told Michigan newspaper
publishers and editors that the
final responsibility for the secur-
ity of the United States rests with
the moulders of public opinion.
Speaking at a luncheon meet-
ing of the University Press Club
of Michigan at the Union, Rep.
Ford declared that it is up to "the
owners, editors and reporters who
write the news" 'to maintain an
informed public opinion.
* * *
"YOU AND YOUR associates
are the real key to the dilemma of
modern politics," Ford told the
newspapermen. "In the exercise
of your daily business, you deter-
mine to a large extent the couse of
things to come-be it war, peace,
fascism or democracy."
Ford also cited the ascendancy
of the newspaper columns over
the editorial page, pointing out
that in recent years newspaper
editorialists have lost much of
their influence.
"This imposes an even greater
responsibility upon the writers of
the news and headlines," he said.
* * *
A REPORT on the Press Club's
program of international fellow-
ships in journalim was also giv-
en at the luncheon by Arthur
Stace, editor of the Ann Arbor
News.
"The main purposes of the
fellowships are to bring to this
country outstanding students
who have a zeal for democracy,
who will come to know our
America ways of life and who
will aid their fellow countrymen
in understanding the values of
our life," Stace said.
Two of the four students now
studying in this country under the
program, Alvise Barison, of Trieste,
Italy , and Hanns Stempf, of Mu-
nich, Germany, are now enrolled
in the University.
Psy c Group
To HoldTalk
The Psychology Colloquium will
hold a symposium on psychology
and the arts at 3:30 p.m. Monday
in the basement of Lane Hall.
Prof. Charles Stevenson of the
philosophy department and Prof.
Austin Warren of the English de-
partment will lead the discussion.
Representatives of the fields of
psychology, history, psychiatry,
architecture and music will also
participate in the meeting.
Debaters Travel
To Bowling Green
Two University varsity debaters
will take part in a demonstration
debate clinic for high school stu-
dents at Bowling Green State Uni-
versity, Bowling Green, Ohio, to-
day.
Ray Daniels, Grad., and Nafe
Katter, Grad., will take the nega-
tive side in a debate on the ques-
tion of direct election of the Presi-
dent of the United States. Bowl-
ing Green debaters will argue for
the affirmative.

The other two, Gerd Padel, of
Zurich, Switzerland, and Rudolf
Soucek, of Innsbruck, Austria, are
now serving a year's interneship
on Michigan newspapers.
All four were introduced at the
luncheon.

44r
/,

Look Pretty
please .. .
Everyone gives a hint

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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counsellor
Roger Williams Guild, 502 East Huron
10:00 A.M:. Bible Study Class. Joshua.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Earl Grandstaff, acting pastor of the Memorial
Christian Church;, on "Our Hope in Christ."
5:45 P.M.: Cost Supper at the Guild House fol-
lowed by an address by the Rev. Mr. Lauten-
slager on "The Future of Christianity in
China," at the Presbyterian Church.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
National Lutheran Council
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
9:10-10:00 A.M.: Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and Trinity
Churches. Communion in Zion.
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Parish Hall.
Program, Movie---"A Mighty Army."
7:30-8:30 P.M. Tuesday: Discussion-Denom-
inations of the Christian Church-at the Cen-
ter.
4:00-5:30 P.M. Wednesday: Tea and Coffee
Hour at the Center.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
10:30 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services in the
ballroom of the Michigan League building.
Nov. 13-Mortals and Immortals.
10:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial meeting.
A free Reading Room is maintained by this church
at 211 East Washington St., where the Bible
and all authorized Christian Science literature
may be read, borrowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily except Sundays and holi-
days from 11:30 A.M. to 5 P.M., on Saturdays
to 9 P.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth .Avenue
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale, Pastor
Rev. Walter S. Press, Pastor
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon: "The
Certainty of Salvation," Rev. Press.
The members of the Student Guild will meet at
the Congregational-Disciples Guild House, 438
Maynard Ave.,, at 2:15 P.M. to leave for
Camp Talahi.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Earl Grandstaff, Acting Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:45 A.M.: Student Class.
10:50 A.M.: Morning Worship.
(Nursery for children during the service.)
The Rev. Chester Loucks, First Baptist Church,
speaking on "Our Common Heritage."
Guild House 438 Maynard
H.L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Associate
Student Guild-6:00 supper at the Congregational
Church. Mrs. Alma Polk of Detroit will speak
on "Human Relations-Our Last Frontier."
Mrs. Polk is a member of the Mayor's Commit-
tee on Racial Understanding.,
VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, Chaplain
John R. Hertzberg, Director of Sacred Music
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Guest speaker, Rev.
DeWitt Baldwin, Director, S. R. C., University
of Michigan.
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
4 :30 P.M.: Study and Discussion, "Christian
Behaviour." Leaders: Ruth Kerr, Thomas
Lambert.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Student Directors-Rev. H. L. Pickerill;
Miss Jean Goree
Music-Wayne Dunlop, J. Bertram Strickland
9:30 to 10:45 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Nursery for small children.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach
on "Building Up or Tearing Down."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild. Supper. Mrs. Alma
Polk ofDetroit will speak on "Human Rela-
tions-Our Last Frontier."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 5560
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
4:30 P.M Saturday: Open House.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday Bible Study. I Car. 8.
10:30 A.M.: Sunday Service, with Holy Com-
munion. Sermon by the pastor, "How To Avoid
Moral Confusion."
5:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper, followed by program at 6:15.
Talk by the pastor, "The Christian Youth
Goes Courting."
9:15 P.M. Tuesday: Social Hour.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 2-0085
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Study Group.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship: Rev. Edward H.
Redman preaching on: "The Sociology of the
Old Testament."
6:30 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group. Discussion
Topic: " 'God'--Retreat from Responsibility?"
Refreshments and Games.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).

COUSIN'S suggests vel-
vet, silk or jersey TIES
to brighten up any outfit.
A wonderful selection in
solids or prints from 59c
to $1.00.

You CAN take it with you

NEW! PERFUME COMPACTS
Concentrated perfume in solid
non-spillable form for fragrant
touch-up! Choose Heaven-Sent,
Apple Blossom, Command Per-
formance, White Magnolia! each
1.00
And to assure you of the right
match..
LIPSTICK COLOR KEYS
Four purse-size lipsticks on a sil-
very chain with heart - shaped
mirror. Five combinations for
individual coloring. 1.50.
Both from the QUARRY

i

),
t

The ELIZABETH DILLON
SHOP has a hat full of ideas
on how to keep your head
warm and yet beautiful.
Take a look at the "Glori-
fied Babushka" by Obeadie
of Hollywood.

r~

The North Wind doth blow
but even with your budget
you can keep your skin soft.
CALKINS & FLETCHER of-
fers Tussy Rich Cream now
1 .00 for the 1.75 size, and
1.95 for the 3.00 size. Also
Dorothy Gray lotions only
1 .00 for the 3.00 size.

uD t
" r ,
.:

4

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CHURCH OF CHRIST
210 N. Fourth Ave.
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Carl York Smith, Minister

0

...

....,,,
----

STAGE COACH INN
Have you any Parties, Banquets
or Receptions?
We will solve this problem for you with delicious meals,
either served at our beautiful dining rooms, or taken

10:15 A.M.: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M.: Worship. Sermon, "In The Last
Days."
7:00 P.M.: Bible Class.
7:30 P.M.: Worship. Sermon, "What Marriage
Is."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon, D.D. and W. H. Henderson,
Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
Mildred Beam, Director of Church School
9:30 A.M.: Westminster Guild Seminar in Re-
ligion.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's ser-
mon topic, "Life's Deeper Meaning."
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild supper in Social

1/ Ji1 i
r
d

For partying

choose a heart-throb dress
. . . flattering pastels in
crepe, taffeta, satin, jersey
or corduroy. MADEMOI-
SELLE has them all in sizes
7-15 and 10-20 from $10.95
to $27.95.

I
.f

or dancing

i i

9:45 A.M.: Church School, Grades 7, 8,1&9.

11

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