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November 10, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PACR ETGTTT

TTTF, IVITCTTTC.AN lr)AITY

TTIT IZISD 1Y", NOVEMBER 10, 1949

~AGK EI4~IIT TTTE MTCTTTCIiN flAIIN THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10,. 1949

BREAKFAST DRAMA?
Posters Bring On 'Pirates' Headache

By PAUL BRENTLINGER
You can no longer believe all
that you read.
Despite what posters may say,
campus musical shows are NOT
going to begin at 8 o'clock in the
morning.
What a Spot
For Christmas
Shopping!
"STORYLAND and
TOYTOWN" on
FOLLETT'S
2nd Floor -- State at North U.

POSTERS appeared on campus
yesterday announcing the Gilbert
and Sullivan Society's production
-f "Pirates of Penzance," on Nov.
30 and Dec. 1 and 2.
Curtain time for the perform-
ance was printed as 8 a.m.
Fea tiny that local publicity men
were going completely overboard to
secure distinction for their shows,
The Daily contacted Dick Webber,
'52E, Gilbert-Sullivan publicity
manager.
* *~ *
"THE SHOW will not compete
with local restaurants for the
breakfast trade," Webber declared
emphatically.
He tore another hair from his
graying head and went on to
condemn the printer for an un-
holy error.
"We let the printer design the

Save TIME and MONEY

poster. He did a fine job, but he
really should have printed 8 p.m.
instead of 8 a.m. as the perform-
ance time," according to Webber.
* * *
"WHILE IT would undoubtedly
be interesting to experiment with
an early morning performance of a
light opera, we do not feel that the
Gilbert and Sullivan Society is
ready for such a radical step," he
continued.
"For one thing,'our cast would
never stand for it," the har-
assed publicity manager said.
A hasty poll of student opinion
indicated that an 8 a.m. perform-
ance would not be very popular.
TYPICAL comment was some-
thing like "I wouldn't go to a show
that early under ANY circum-
stances."
But Miriam Cady, '50, said "I
would go to an 8 a.m. show if the
proper person were taking me, and
if he were taking me to breakfast
first."
Marian Davis, '52, said that
ordinarily she would not con-
sider going to an 8 a.m. show.
However, she said she "would go
to see "Pirates of Penzance" at
any hour."
* * *
THIS MISPLACED time ele-
was not the only headache con-
fronting Webber, who discovered
that the posters also fail to cite
the price of tickets to the show
and its Ann Arbor place of per-
formance.
"We hope that no one will stray
over to Rackham Amphitheatre,"
he moaned fervently, alluding to
the confusion which might result
from the notice of the performance
to be given Dec. 3 at Rackham Altl-
ditorium in Detroit.
Tickets for the Ann Arbor show,
in Pattengill Auditorium, are $f.20
and $.90. Detroit prices run $1.80
and $1.20.
Educational Films
Educational films concerning
the Earth and Its Peoples 'are be-
ing presented at 4:10 p.m. each
Friday at Kellogg Auditorium by
University Extension Service and
the Audio-Visual Education Cen-
ter.
Tropical Lowlands, concerning
Brazil; and Horsemen of the
Pampa, a film about Argentina,
will be shown Nov. 11.

ASSOCIATED PRESS
POCTURE NEWNS

W E S T E R N G E R M A N Y' S H E AIU S-- Dr. Theodor Heuss (left), President of new
Western German Republic, and his Chancellor, Dr. Konrad Adenauer, discuss state affairs at Bonn.

l1oo

Longer leisure
Automatic washing machines

1f Useful time added to wash day
' No waiting, if call for appointments
t" Dryers available
1/0 Relax while your washing is done
Onlyow 25c a load
t Makes clothes cleaner than ever
tO Air conditioned
iTakes only one half hour
HALF-HOUR LAUNDRY

FIRST SIGHT OF LOVEBIRD-Elizabeth Jane
Arnold, of Washington, D. C., 5, born with impaired vision, smiles
at the lovebird she can see after an operation by Dr. John McLean
in which the defective cornea of one eye was replaced by one
taken immediately after death from a patient who had offered it.

510 E. Williams

Phone 5540

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$85.00 to $95.00

C L O C K W A T C H E R-Leopold Metzenberg, of Chicago, sits in his study beneath some of the
110 clocks which, with 525 rare watches, he has collected as a hobby over a period of years.

G L A C I E R S T U D Y --Dr. Thomas C. Poulter packs a
battery charger up the face of Taku Glacier in Alaska during tests
of ice thickness by members of Stanford Research Institute.

. '

C A N A D I A N B A L L E T-Members of the Winnipeg Ballet offer a tableau of "Visages,"
their presentation in the Canadian Ballet Festival at Toronto given by dance groups from six cities.

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