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November 03, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1946

1"lpAGE S1VIN

TH3E MICHIG AN DAILY

x .

VILLAGE SALE PROPOSED:
Disposal of Willow Run
Announced Prematurely

Scholarship Trophy Goes Tio Winchell

Earlier announcements indicat-
ing that Willow Run housing proj-
ect would be sold as a unit, were
described Tuesday as "premature"
by Public Housing Administration
officials..
At a hearing, requested by
Washtenaw County officials, Hugo
Schwartz, Detroit PHA field rep-
resentative, stated however, that
"there are people in the agency
who feel the land should be sold
in its entirety as a technique of
sale."
He SAID his aim was to investi-
gate local opinion and not to say
"this is the policy which will be
followed."
Washtenaw county agencies
and governmental units present-
ed various viewpoints to the
PHA representatives in a 10-
page "bill of particulars" read
by County Prosecutor Douglas
K. Reading.

An official county statement
said newspaper announcement of
the proposed sale of Willow Run
as a unit "was received by the citi-
zens and officialsof this county
with much surprise and concern."
SUCH A PLAN would violate a
previous understanding that the
property would be returned even-
tually to the local government or
private ownership, according to
county officials.
They maintained that "order-
ly disposition and re-develope-
ment of Willow Run requires
gradual elimination of the war-
time emergency housing units
and the sale of the property as
it becomes vacated."
The official county statement
was that "there be no misunder-
standing of our position on this.
We do not say this entire housing
area should be removed now or
that any of it should be taken
down tomorrow."
* * *
"WE RECOGNIZE that for the
benefit of the citizens of the
country at large the moving of
this population must be gradual,
but we also say that the policy for
accomplishing this should be
formulated and announced as soon
as possible."
Schwartz stated that the gov-
ernment had to be guided by
soundebusiness practice, but
county officials insisted that the
question of monetary return to
the government should be a
secondary aim.
PHA can keep the 2,000 acre
project under government controll
until January 1, 1951, according to
Schwartz.1

Garnering the highest combined
scholastic average among men's
residence halls for the past two
semesters, Winchell House was
awarded Phi Eta Sigma's new
scholarship trophy.
It marked the first time the tro-
phy has been presented, according
to Don Nelson, '52, president of
Phi Eta Sigma, national freshman
honor fraternity for men.
* * *
WINCHELL HOUSE led the
men's residence halls with a com-
bined grade point average of 2.65,
closely followed by Adams House
with 2.64. Both dormitories are
in the West Quadrangle.
"As part of a program to bet-
ter freshman scholarship, Phi
Eta Sigma works through men's
residence halls because of the
large number of first year stu-
dents living there," Nelson said.
- He outlined the trophy's dual
purpose of "rewarding the winning
residence hall last year for its
scholastic record, and encourag-
ing good scholarship in all resi-
dence halls during the present
year."
AN IMPOSING two and one-
half foot cup topped by the figure
of a man holding high a laural
wreath, the trophy was presented
to Winchell House by Nelson and
Dean of Students Erich A. Walter.
Receiving it were George Bouch-
er, '51, Winchell president and

Iran Shah
0 - -
Will Visit
Ann Arbor
Mahammed Reza Pahlavi, Shah
of Iran is expected to visit Ann

(Continued from Page 1

ing work in children's services. At
the Washington conference actual
reform legislation will be pushed,"
Mrs. Pice said.

services for mental health of
children are the topics most con-
cerning us," Mrs. Price explained.
GOV. WILLIAMS has expressed
a "real interest" in the latter, -he

overnor's Conference Laid
Groundwork for Commission

Arbor on November 26. According to Mrs. Price the added.
His brother, His Imperial High- following problems will be par- Mrs. Price further hoped that
is, roer, MHimpReza iah- ticularly stressed at this con- young people will have a realistic
lavi, is a graduate student in the .ference: opportunity to share in these pro-
business school. "Role of the parent, environ- jects and present their own opin-
* * * mental influences and-mainly-- ions.
AFTER VISITING Washington
as the guest of President Truman
the Shah will proceed to New York
City. He is scheduled to fly from
there to Detroit, arriving on No-
vembeTHE AlLY CO"MPASS
vember 25.
He will inspect General Mo- Liberal New Y Newspaper
tors plants and other installa- York
tions in the Motor City. A flight
to Wright Air Force Base at
Dayton, Ohio has also been
planned.
The Persian Shah is expected to Outstanding Literary Monthly
drive to Ann Arbor on November
26. His party will probably have
lunch here and return to Detroit On Sale
late in the day.
DETAILS OF a welcoming pro- Blue Front Cigar Store
gram for the Shah would not, for
diplomatic reasons, be revealed State and Packard
until the sovereign's arrival in this
country, according to Dr. Esson
Gnlp honl o lnTfn nirn

--Daily-Carlyle Marshall
TOPS IN SCHOLARSHIP-Leading men's residence halls in
scholarship with a 2.65 grade point average, Winchell House,
West Quadrangle, receives Phi Eta Sigma's new scholarship tro-
phy. Don Nelson, '52, right, national freshman honor society
president, hands the cup to George Boucher, '51, Winchell presi-
dent. Looking on are Dean of Students Erich A. Walter, next
to Boucher, and Lawrence DeRidder, Grad., Winchell resident ad-
visor.
* - * * *
Lawrence DeRidder, Grad, Win- House was congratulated by Bill
chell resident advisor. Diener, '51E, president of Adams
At a later ceremony before the House, which had the highest coin-
West Quad Council, Winchell bined average a year ago.

STUDENTS .NOTICE
?2 Lb. tin of
BR IGGS
PIPE TOBACCO
(reg. 75c value)
PLUS A
STANHOPE PIPE
(reg. $3.50 value)
Both for $1.95
AT MICHIGAN UNION
CIGAR COUNTER
Today and Tomorrow

REPORTS TO BE GIVEN:

University Press Club To Hold Meeting

The 32nd annua meeting of the
University Press Club of Michigan
will open next Thursday after-
noon with a tea at the home of
President Alexander G. Ruthven.
Following the tea, a dinner will
be held at the Union at which'
President Ruthven will deliver his
annual report on the University
to the Michigan newspapermen.
* * *
ON FRIDAY morning, Prof.
Clare E. Griffin of the School of
* *

Business Administration will give
a "Report on Britain." Prof. Grif-
fin spent several months in Eng-
land and made a careful study of
the implications to the United
States of Britain's socialist gov-
ernment.
Rep. Gerald R. Ford, Jr., of
the Fifth Michigan Congres-
sional District, will address the
Friday luncheon meeting on the
"Fourth Estate in Modern Poli-
tics."
* *

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Pres. Ruthven's Report
To Recall Previous Blast

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When President Ruthven deliv-
ers his annual report .n the Uni-
versity to the University Press
Club next Thursday night, many
of the newsmen in the audience
will probably recall the hard-hit-
ting speech which he made to
them last year.
At that time Dr. Ruthven blast-
ed the trends which "place any-
one who questions the status quo
under suspicion."
* * *
SPECIFICALLY, he leveled his
sights on pressure groups and spe-
cial interests who he said had
"created an atmosphere of fear
which interferes with the work of
schools" and called for educa-
tional institutions and the press
to combine to battle the three ene-
mies of freedom - ignorance, sel-
fishness and superstition.
Noted for his hard-hitting,
frank addresses at the Press Club
meetings, President Ruthven at-
tacked the "many half-baked
criticism of our newspapers" in
his 1947 speech.
Asking the newspapermen to in-
terpret educational institutions for
Ithe public, he pointed out that,
"At present no paper is seriously
endeavoring to explain the activi-
Ai

The afternoon session will be de-
voted to a discussion of the impli-
cations of atomic energy. Heading
the panel will be Dr. Robert Pidd,
nuclear physicist, Prof. Fred Hod-
ges of the roentgenology depart-
ment and Prof. William Haber of
the economics department.
* * *
FRIDAY EVENING, W. R. Wal-
ton, managing editor of the South
Bend, Ind., Tribune, will speak on
"Newspaper Public Relations."
The conference will close Sat-
urday with a press clinic and busi-
ness meeting, following which the
press will be guests of the Board
in Control of Intercollegiate Ath-
letics at the - Indiana-Michigan
game.
Fund Drive
QuiotaUnfilled
Thirty-eight per cent of the
University's Community Chest
Drive quota was realized Tuesday
according to Prof. Albert F. Neu-
mann of the Law School.
The University quota of $25,000
is a part of Ann Arbor's total
quota of $151,000.
Prof. Neumann pointed out that
the campaign ends tomorrow
He expects that last minute con-
tributions will make the drive a
success.
The University quota is separ-
ate from' that of the University
Hospital which has its own solici-
tors and goal..

Uai neau of the Internationai
Center.
After his Michigan visit, the
30-year-old Shah will fly, on
November 28, to Fort Knox,
Kentucky.
Expected to arrive in Washing-
ton D.C. November 16, the young
sovereign of oil-rich Persia will
make the journey aboard Presi-
dent Truman's private plane.
As yet Shah Pahlavi has not left
Tehran, his capital in the Near
East.
Sileox To Talk
On Economics
Lewis K. Sillcox, vice-president
of the New York Air Brake Co.,
Watertown, N.Y., will return to
Ann Arbor tomorrow for a series
of talks to economics classes and
seminars.
He visited Ann Arbor yesterday
as a special lecturer in the eco-
nomics department.
An outstanding authority in
the field of transportation, Sill-
cox has served as a visiting lec-
turer at such universities as Har-
vard, Yale and Princeton as well
as the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology.
Enough aspirin was produced in
the United States in 1948 to have
relieved 7,500,000,000 headaches at
the rate of two tablets per head-
ache.

ties of schools to those who sup-
port them."
* *
HE MADE a plea for the press
and schoolmen to work together
to build confidence in education.
In addition, he suggested that
young people from different coun-
tries who are interested in news-
paper work be brought from abroad
to promote better foreign rela-
tions.
In 1946 President Ruthven
briefly surveyed the tense in-
ternational situation and charg-
ed that "while we believe in de-
mocracy, there seems to be little
faith in the impact of democracy
on communism."
"Is this lack of faith not due
in part at least to our knowledge
that American democracy in prac-
tice hardly lives up to its ideals?"
he asked.
Because of this situation, he as-
serted that it was time to give
more lip service to the opinion
that education is the most im-
portant of human activities.

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IT'S A TRADITION AT MICHIGAN
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Women's shoes will be lighte
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spring. Cut-out pumps and mu
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and both pumps and sandals w
be available in several tones
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