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November 02, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T - Y MICN AMIL

Tabulating Service

Functions as

U' Brain

I , - -

* *

* *

* *

Ai

-Daily-Carlyle Marshall
MECHANICAL HANDS-Edward Zumbroegel of the University Tabulating Service removes cards
from the "sorter" which automatically sorts and counts the records at a rate of more than 400
a minute.

Machines Give
iStatstical Data
By JIM BROWN
Almost suggestive of a grotesque copy of an engineering labora-
tory, the Tabulating Service on the fourth floor of the Administration
Building acts as the mechanical brain center of the University.
Headed by Kurt Benjamin, formerly of the Graduate Record Ex-
amination of the Carnegie Foundation and the Industrial Surveys
Company, the Service prepares statistical analysis reports for several
University units such as the Registrar's Office, the Survey Research
Center and the. Business Office.
IN ADDITION, it makes statistical analysis reports for any othei
University unit, or for individual faculty members and graduate stu-
dents who are conducting special research projects with financial
backing.
To make these reports, seven different types of machines are
employed. Rented from the International Business Machines Cor-
poration, these machines are the most up-to-date equipment
available.
"Most of the equipment is very flexible, the machine being in-
structed what to do on the basis of a control panel which somewhat
resembles a telephone switchboard," Benjamin said.
* * * *
THE MOST COMPLICATED of the machines are the three "Tab-
ulators" which list, add and substract information punched on cards
and perform complicated combinations of these functions.
Six "Key Punches" are employed which are the basic units that
record information by punching holes in the special cards. After
this operation, the accuracy of the "Key Punches" is checked by
one of the five "Verifiers."
To eliminate the tedious job of sorting, counting and arranging
cards, six "Sorters" are used which can handle between 400 and 450
cards a minute. The sorted cards are then turned over to the "Inter-
pretor" which mechanically reads the information which is recorded
by the punched holes and prints it on the cards.
TWO "REPRODUCERS" are used to transfer the punches from
one set of cards to another in any desired order, verify this transfer,
and, when attached to tabulator record groups totals.
In addition, two "Collators" are available which match dif-
ferent decks of cards and pull out matched or unmatched groups
or refile cards.
To operate these complex machines, Benjamin has a staff of be-
tween 25 and 30 people. A limited number of students are employed.
. * * * *
THE TABULATING SERVICE is run as a self-supporting unit,
charging other University departments and individuals on a cost
basis. Very rarely they take outside work when it doesn't interfere
with University work. In this case a higher rate is charged.
One of the major projects handled by the Service every year is
the tabulating of student grades, along with individual and group
honor point averages for the Registrar's Office.
Recently, another statistical study done by the Service helped to
analyze the faculty evaluation data collected by the literary college
and the engineering school.
AWAY FROM I ALL:

scholarship
Applications
Accepted
Applications are now being ac-
cepted for the scholarships and
fellowships established through
the $10,000 gift by the Curtiss-
Wright Corporation to the Univer-
sity.
Seven $1,000 fellowships and six
$500 scholarships will be distrib-
uted over a three-year period to
qualified students interested in
aircraft propulsion and in air-
frame and power-plant manufac-
turing and production.
* * *

TWO SCHOLARSHIPS and one
fellowship will be awarded this
fall. Scholarships will go to stu-
dents who have completed at least
their freshman year with above
average academic standing, and
who are partially self-supporting.
The fellowship will go to an
American citizen who ca~n meet
graduate school entrance require-
ments, with the expectation that
he will obtain a master's degree in
aeronautical engineering

la

-Daily-Carlyle Marshall
MECHANICAL BRAIN-Mrs. Alice Ellsworth of the University
Tabulating Service is shown operating one of the Service's "Tabu-
lators." The complex machine automatically lists and punches
information on special record cards.

t

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*0

Olsen Opens
Educational
Conference
Prof. Willard C. Olson, Director
of Research on child development
at University Elementary School,
will open the twentieth annual
Parent Education Institute at 9
a.m. today in the Rackham Build-
ing.
As part of the conference which
is being jointly sponsored by the
Michigan Congress of Parents and
Teachers and the University Ex-
tension Service, Prof. Olson will
conduct a class on the emotional
development of the child.
PROF. H. H. GILES, of the edu-
cation school, a director of the
Center for Human Relations Stud-,
ies at New York University, will
conclude the morning session with
his lecture on Human Relations.
During the afternoon, discus-
sion periods on The Child inthe
Home and the Child in School
will be held.
Prof. Karl Stern, chief of the
gerontological unit of the psychi-
atry department at McGill Uni-
versity, will address the evening
meeting of the Institute on the
Oldster in Home and Family Life.
His talk will be open to the general
public without charge.
REGISTRATION for the two
day conference will take place at
8:15 a.m. today in the foyer of
the Rackham Building.
Today's
Pro grams
MYSTERY-9 p.m. WHRV-Boris
Karloff.
9:30 p.m. WHRV-The Croup-
ier.
VARIETY-9:30 p.m. WJR-Bing
Crosby Show with Bob Hope.
NEWS-7:45 p.m. WJR--Edward
R. Murrow.
FOOTBALL - 8 p.m. WXYZ -
Touchdown: Telecast of Ohio
State vs. Northwestern game.
MUSIC - 11:30 p.m. CKLW -
Deems Taylor.

Union Coffee
Hour Today
The second in the current series
of student faculty coffee hours will
be held from 4-5 p.m. today in the
Union's Terrace Room.
This week students and faculty
of the sociology department are
the honored guests.
These Union-sponsored coffee
hours 'are designed to give stu-
dents and faculty members an
opportunity to discuss their mu-
tual problems over a refreshing
cup of coffee.
"Coffee hours are excellent oc-
casions for ,students to meet their
professors."

I

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4

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Lane Hall 'Retreats' Foster
International Understanding

Ever wanted to take a week-end
off from studies and really "get
away from it all?"
Lane Hall's Interculture De-
partment enables American and
foreign students to do this to-
gether on periodic "retreats," and
helps international understanding
at the same time.
* * * .
THE NEXT RETREAT will take
place Saturday and Sunday at the
Detroit Recreation Camp, accord-
ing to Wayne Kuhns, Jr., '51, co-
chairman of the department.
Subject of discussion will be
"The Michigan Plan Against
Discrimination."
Kuhns emphasized that the In-
tercultural Department is open to
people of all races and religions.
"By giving American and foreign
students a chance to work, eat and
play together, we hope to under-
stand each other's viewpoints
better," he declared.
MONTHLY meetings held at the
homes of various faculty members
feature discussions on current
problems. Recreation at the meet-
ings includes party games and
singing of foreign folk songs in the
original languages.
Besides Kuhns, other co-
chairmen of the Interculture

Committee are D. B. Dutt,
Grad., of India; and Edith Lind-
ner, Spec., from Germany.
Retreats are held as often as
possible at places like the Detroit
Recreation Camp at Brighton, and
Pinebrook, northeast of Whitmore
Lake. Students do all necessary
work on the trips, including cook-
ing and housekeeping. They sleep
in cabins.
* * *
RESERVATIONS for this week's
retreat must be made in Lane Hall
by 6 p.m. Friday, Kuhns said.
Cost is $2.50 per student, payable
when the reservation is made.
The group will leave Lane Hall
at 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Transpor-
tation will be provided by the de-
partment, which asked that all
those attending bring w a r m
clothes and heavy blankets.
Soldiers Slave for Salt
The expression "earning your
salt" is by no means a modern1
term, but has a deep-rooted heri-
tage. Salt was once so scarce and
precious that it was used as
money. Caesar's soldiers received
a part of their salary in common
salt. The word salary comes from
the Latin word sal-meaning salt.

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