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October 30, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TAGE TIME

FACULTY FOR KNOWING:
Hussey Preaches spel of Gelogy'

Xi teftin9 in...
... with ROZ VIRSHUP

Camera Club Trains First Class ooters
By EVA SIMON ed discussions on the finer points as a career, to most it is simply
Every so often a group of other- of photography. h a hobby,
wise normal students get a wild -

i.

* *,

By PETER HOTTON
A "high priest of education"
might be another name for Prof.
Russel C. Hussey of the geology
department.
His theory is to "carry the gos-
pel of geology to as many persons
as possible and to acquaint them
with the earth they live on."
HUSSEY has already spent more
than 30 years on this gospel, for
he has traveled all over the coun-
try and then some.
Wherever he goes, whether on
business or pleasure, he manages
to pack in some lantern slides
and is ready toatalk to anyone
at the drop of a geology ham-
mer.
His first interest in geology
came when he went to high school
in Colorado. "At that time we had
geology in high school and our
fieldtrips took us all through
mountains, canyons and national
parks," he said.
HE CAME to the University for
his bachelor's degree, but the
World War delayed his doctorate
until 1920. He claims that the war
cured his rambling, but it didn't
stop his seeing all 48 states.
Usually a doctor's thesis is
completed before a student gets
his degree, but Hussey is still
working on his.
Its climax will come when the
Michigan Geological Survey pho-
tographs and publishes some of the
fossils he collected around Escan-
aba in the Upper Peninsula for his
thesis.
ONE OF HUSSEY'S secrets in
teaching is his fascination in his
subject. Every time he sees some-
thing in his teaching, he is just as
interested as the first time he saw
it.
"Every time I see a formation
or reconstruction in geology I
learn something new," he com-
mented.
Another secret of his popularity
is to throw out all notes in lec-
tures.
"WHEN STUDENTS see a pro-
fessor lecturing from notes, they
have his number right off and he
has two strikes against him from
the start," he declared.
"If your interest lags, it is
time to quit teaching," he add-
ed.
Hussey's technique is also aided
by his lantern slides. He has 3,000
of them, all hand-painted, which
he collected from his travels. And
he's the best authority to talk on
them because he took most of the
pictures himself.
WHEN THE University inaug-
urated fieldtrips each summer to

I , I

Color television, which has been
lurching just around the corner
for quite a while now is fast be-
coming a reality.
Tests completed in Washington
in connection with Federal Com-
munications Commission hearings
have paraded pastel-gowned mo-
dels, maltese cats, rainy weather
football games and cooking in-
structions (to mention a few) be-
fore the color television cameras.
MOST SENSATIONAL of the
tests have been surgery in techni-
color. Top ranking surgeons per-
formed for the TV cameras giving'
a play by play commentary on
everything from a Nephrecomy to
a common bile duct exploration'
through a tiny microphone tucked
away in their surgeons masks.
Medical educators have gone
so far as to say that color TV
will make operating room am-
phitheatres a thing of the past.
'For the past few months tests'
and testimony have been present-
ed at the FCC hearings to deter-
mine whether or not present color

systems are ready
use.

for commercial

* * *
THE QUESTION of compatibil-
ity, ability to pick up color broad-
casts on black and white sets andl
vice versa, as well as cost of the
innovation to the public are cur-
rently being batted around.
Major controversy centers
about CBS and RCA both of
whom have their own little plans
for making the lives of tele-
vision viewers brighter.
At present CBS with its 3-color
system is gunning for immediate
approval while RCA has petitioned
for a postponement of hearings.
The latest receivers presented at
FCC hearings will be able to pick
up pictures in either color or
black and white of any of the pro-
posed color systems as well as
present black and white broad-
casts. It can be manufactured to
retail at approximately the same
as present black and white re-
ceivers.

urge to shoot.
Channeling this impulse into
peaceful, creative lines is the pur-
pose of the West Quad Camera
Club.
MEMBERS RANGE from rank
amateurs with $2 box cameras to
near professionals with a 1,000
dollars' worth of equipment.
"Shooting sessions" at which
members photograph everything
from vases to professional mo-
dels are a popular activity of the
group.
The club holds weekly "bull ses-
sions," at which members criticize
each others' prints and hold heat-

MEMBERS GET a chance to
exhibit their works at salons held
every semester in the West Quad.
Local merchants donate prizes for
the best prints on these occasions.
Lectures and demonstrations,
by professional photographers as
well as the more experienced
members are another feature of
the club.
Every semester the club trains
a new batch of beginners, who are
encouraged to go into salon work
as soon as possible, according to
John Mackey, president.
THOUGH SOME of the mem-
bers are considering photography

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-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
INSPIRATION TO GEOLOGISTS-Prof. Russel C. Hussey of the
geology department contemplates one of the things lie finds most

interesting in his
amphibian extinct

-

work-bones.
for millions
* *

Niagara Falls, Hussey conducted
and spoke on them.
Because of higia costs of trans-
portation, the University was
forced to give up the Niagara
trips. But Hussey still takes ge-
ology students through Michigan,'
Ohio and Ontario during the
summers.
BESIDES HAVING traveled and
studied in the 48 states, Hussey
has acquainted himself with the
British Isles and Southern France.
He has always been interested
in archeology as well as ge-
ology, and hopes someday to go
to North Africa to study the
ancient cities there.
Another area he'd like to ex-
plore is the ancient caves of South-

But the skeleton is not some
of years, it's just an alligator.
* *
ern France and to study the cave-
drawings of Neanderthal and cro-
magnon men.
Next summer he plans to go to
the University's geology camp in
Wyoming and then to Oregon and
Washington. On the return trip
he hopes to go by Lake Louise in
British Columbia.
HUSSEY'S life-long hopes are
to work on the ancient cliff-dwell-
ings and Pueblos in the South-
west.
He has an answer for everything.
Asked why he had a picture of a
cathedral in his office, he replied,
"Some people just can't connect
geology with Genesis, but when
we show them geological works by
famous men of religion, they're
satisfied."

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