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October 29, 1949 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

TIHE MICHI GAN fiXiLY

SATMRDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1949

.OW-WOW!
East Quad's Hamburger
Returns to 'U' Campus

Pop!

By ED LANNING
Hamburger is back!
The little black and white mon-
grel, who last year achieved na-
tion-wide fame through his ap-
pearance in newsreels of Michfan
football games, has been seen on
campus by several individuals.
Parent 'Ed'
P , T
InS tiue Will
Meet Here

The 20th annual session
Parent Education Institute
held here Nov. 2 and 3.

of the
will be

The Institute, consisting of
speeches and group discussions is
a joint project of the Extension
Service and the Michigan Con-
gress of Parents and Teachers.
AMONG SUBJECTS to be cov-
ered by the Institute are: Emo-
tional Development In the Life of
the Child, Human Relations, The
Oldster in Home and Family Life,
Children Around the World, The
Child in the Community, and
Home and Church.
Purpose of the Institute is to
provide information on parent-
teacher-child relationships.
Speakers and discussion leaders
at the Institute include:
* * *
PROF. WILLARD C. Olson, of
the education school and psychol-
ogy department, and director of
research in child development in
University Elementary School;
Prof. H.- H. Giles, director of the
Center for Human Relations Stud-
ies and member of the School of
Education at New York University;
and Dr. Karl Stern, of McGill
University.
Other speakers and discussion
leaders are: Mary E. Sweeny,,
lecturer and consultant on edu-
cation for home and family life,
and member of a State Depart-
ment agricultural mission to
India, and Mrs. C. C. Clark, re-
gional vice-president of the Na-
tional Congress of Parents and
Teachers.
Registration for the Institute
will open at 8:15 a.m. Wednesday
in the Rackham Building.
University students and faculty
members may obtain badges at the
registration desk entiling them to
free admission to the Institute. All
tthers will be charged $1.00 ad
mission each day.
Father Sophocles
To Teach Greek
Classes in modern Greek will be
taught by Father S. M. Sophocles
from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Monday, Wed-
nesday and Friday at the St.
Nicholas Hellenic Orthodox
Church, 414 N. Main St.
University courses in Greek
stress the classical approach. Fa-
ther Sophocles' class will study
Greek as it is spoken in Greece
today.
Those interested in the course
may register at the offices of the
church.

"I SAW HIM at about 11:00 a.m.
on October 10," an East Quad
man affirmed. "He was in front of
Alumni Memorial Hall. I know it
was Hamburger."
Thursday night the dog put in
a brief appearance at the East
Quad, where he virtually lived
last year. When he appeared,
joyous cries of "Here's Ham-
burger!" reverberated through
the courtyard.
Last year he was unofficially
recognized as the East Quad mas-
cot. He slept in the halls and even
in the rooms, begged from the
diners in the chow halls and gen-
erally usen the Quad as an over-
sized dog-house.
HIS EXPLOITS at football
games are practically legendary.
Disregarding the rules of play, he
frequently went in as a twelfth
player for the Wolverines, disrupt-
ing the game and giving the fans a
laugh.
Once he was caught by the
newsreel cameras as he ran onto
the field. The pictures of the
game were sent all over the
country. When they were shown
at local theatres, the appear-
ance on the field of Hamburger
was greeted with cheers and
laughter by the audience.
At basketball games, too, he
showed his resounding love of ath-
letics.' Unable to get onto the
fenced-off court, he nevertheless
managed to disturb the players
and interrupt the game by bark-
ing and running around the fence.
He is seldom seen now. He no
longer attends sporting events. He
apparently has deserted his bene-
factors in the East Quad. But
Hamburger is back on campus and
with him has returned the legend
of the football-playing dog.
Surgeons Visit
MedicalSchool
Fourteen Swedish surgeons and
one Finnish surgeon are visiting
the University Department of Sur-
gery as part of a tour of impor-
tant surgery centers.
The group recently attended the
International Surgical Society
Congress in New Orleans.
While in Ann Arbor, the visiting
surgeons will participate in a pro-
,gram of reading medical papers
4w0i members of the University
Hospital staff.
Yesterday, the group attended
an operative clinic where they
viewed operations performed by
several members of the Univer-
sity Hospital surgery department.
In the afternoon, the visiting sur-
geons presented their papers on
surgical research and actvity in
their native countries.
Dean Attends Meet
Dean Ivan C. Crawford, of the
engineering college, is attending
a symposium of the American So-
ciety for Engineers in Kansas City.
The topic under consideration
is "The Place of Nuclear Studiesi
in the Engineering Curriculum."

Sedgwick
Medal Goes
ToVaughn
Dr. Harry F. Vaughan, dean of
the public health school, received
the William T. Sedgwick Memor-
ial Medal recently at the 77th
annual meeting of the American
Public Health Association in New
York.
The medal is awarded annually
for outstanding achievement in the
field of public health. It was pre-
sented to Dr. Vaughan for his
work during the past 25 years as
head of the Detroit City Health
Department and Dean of the Uni-
versity of Michigan School of
Public Health since 1941.
*
AFTER THE presentation, Dr.
Vaughan addressed the group on
Sedgwick, a Boston biologist who
advocated present day health
practices at the turn of the cen-
tury. He stressed preparing in-
dividuals for work in sanitary bi-
ology, sanitation, epidemiology and
public health statistics.
"In 1902, Sedgwick empha-
sized the need for including full-
time physicians trained in the
science and experience of public
health practices as health de-
partment personnel," Dr.
Vaughan pointed out.
"He also stresses the part the
bacteriologist and sanitary engi-
need should play in performing
necessary investigations into the
field of environmental health.
They must also serve as advisors
and coworkers to medical officers."
"Sedgwick further demanded in
1905 as a fundamental practice in
the public health service that
health directors possess tact, cour-
age and firmness," Dr. Vaughan
concluded.

PU ICIIASE

A Union mixer, scheduled to be-
gin at 2 p.m. today, will provide
"Wolverine rooters with a well
rounded social afternoon.
The music of Frank House's or-
chestra will be featured in the
South Terrace Room of the Union.
Radios will be scattered around the
North Terrace Room for those who

Union Holds 'List-nu and Dance' Mixer Today

wish to follow the Michigan-Illi- be graphically recorded as it comes
nois game between dances. over the radio.
A LARGE CHALK board will No admission will be charged for
be placed at one end of the room the mixer, according to Bill Pe-
and the action of every play will terson of the Union staff.
.Rf-ad and UseDaily Classified Ads

CAUGHT IN THE ACT: The young man decided to help himself
to some popcorn but the machine put up some tough resistance.
Concerned onlookers try to loosen his hand which became stuck
in the machine when the young fellow explored the mechanism.
LOVE WILL OUT:
Authentic 'Romeo ad Juliet'
To Star in Guild Prodution*

regulia r
mnufaettsrers

_i

Love will reign supreme when
the curtain rises on the University
of Michigan Theatre Guild's forth-
coming production of "Romeo and
Juliet."
For Edmund Johnston, 'Grad,
of Akron, Ohio and Eleanor Little-
field, '50, of Delmar, New York,
who will play the title roles, an-
nounced their engagement Sun-
day.
THE GUILD, organized in April,
is designed to offer would-be Bern-
hardts and Barrymores an outlet
for their theatrical inspirations.
Its founders believe that students
will welcome an organization on
campus which emphasizes interest
first, and previous training and
experience second.
Students also interested in
directing, staging, musical back-
ground and other phases of the
theatre have joined the group to
handle the more technical as-
pects of producing a play.
Featured in the cast of the
Shakespearian classic in addition
to Miss Littlefield and Johnston
are Donald Yates, '52 as Friar
Lawrence, Harvey Stuart, 50, who
will portray Mercutio and Janet
Baker, '51 as the Nurse.
* * *
OTHER MEMBERS of the cast
include Donald Hawley, '51 Arch,
as Capulet; Donald Nash, '50, Ben-
volio; Al Yezbick, '51, Tybalt;
Thomas Boothby, 'Grad, Friar
John.
The list continues with Rob-
ert Brake, '50L, as Baithasar;
Marce Dean, '50, as Lady Mon-
tague; Ted Miller, '51, Paris and
Swaminathun Balasubrame-
niam, '51, who will play the
Prince.
Donald Decker, 'Grad, former
director of the Little Theatre
Group in Willow _Run, will direct

the production while Mark Har-
ris, '50, one of the organizers of
the Guild, will be the producer.
Assistant director will be Rich-
ard Chau, who recently directed
a production of R.U.R. in Shang-
hai. He has also translated sev-
eral English plays into Chinese.

I

I

Glace or Suede

J acoLonl

F O
SNOW TOPPER
B'rrr months ahead, but not afoot. Joyce's
weather-wise boot for campus . . . for stadium
for all outdoors. Of Coltskin leather lined
all through with soft white lambs' wool. Water
resistant soles of Neoprene crepe, Palimino, Red.
$10.95

FABULOUS LEATHER GLOVES
3 95
Mode to sell for $5
HERE'S EXCELLENT WORKMANSHIP in fine leather . . . scores of
pliant leather gloves in varying styles to accessorize all your
fall-winter costumes. And priced so low, you'd hardly believe
it possible. In the glace leather, choose the handsewn 3-button
classic, or the pique-sewn shortie with the scalloped edge. In
suede, there's the 3-button vent cuff glove. Black, brown or
white; sizes 6 to 71 2 (one-quarter sizes, too!)

t

ELRUUFEIS -;

SKYLON'S

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
3 .60 1.53 2.52
4 .80 2.04 .4.80
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
FOR SALE
SAVE MONEY
Gabardine Pants-$4.95; Michigan
Sweat-Shirts-$1.95. Navy "T" Shirts
45c; All Wool Sweat Socks-49c
U.S. Navy-Army Type Oxfords-$6.88
S 'SOpen until 6:30 p.m.
SAM'S STORE, 1226 E.Washington )6
OLDS CORNET-Very good condition.
Call Jean 5901. )37
EXCHANGE-2 main fioor tickets Tues-
day Boston Symphony Concert for 2
similar for S,nday. Ph. 5519 )28
SPECIAL REDUCED STUDENT RATES
available on LIFE and TIME. Through
Student Periodical Agency, Don An-
derson (Grad; manager. 705 1st
Nat'l Bldg. Phone 2-82-42. )3
SLIGHTLY used, solid gold, self-wind-
ing Omega wristwatch. Retails for
$200. Will sell for only $120. Write E.
Timbers, 1265 Sudbury Court, Willow
Village. )31
BEAUTIFUL new log cabin, modern,
located in Glenbrook subdivision,
Half Moon Lake, partly furnished.
Phone one~r. 820.) 9

FOR SALE
MODEL A-1931 Coupe, new tires, new
ring and valve job. Call Dillingham.
2-5192. 1617 Cambridge. ) 41
LOST AND FOUND
TAN LOOSE LEAF ZIPPER NOTE-
BOOK, Wednesday, Oct. 26 at Pret-
zel Bell. Reward for contents. No
questions asked. Cali Stan 2-3533.
) 59L
LOST-A lady's Elgin Wrist Watch on
S. Univ. near East Engine at 1:00, Oct.
26. Notify Marie Burke. Ph. 2036,
Stockwell. ) 57L
FEMALE ENGLISH SETTER 5 months
old. Predominately white with black
ears and eye markings., Black spots
on body and brown on legs. Reward
offered. Notify John Gwin. Phone
3-1135 at any time. )58L
LOST-Selmer flute, black case. Notify
Jay Morton; 2-5186. )55L
LOST-white horn rimmed glasses. Vi-
cinity of Thompson Street. Phone
7039-Bob. ) 56L
HELP WANTED
EARN LIBERRAL COMMISSION in
school selling kits of beautiful
matched fabric and yard, imported
and hand-loomed, for sweater-skirt
sets. For details write to Loom-Sets,
Box 251, G.P.O., New York 1, N.Y. )9H
CAN YOU SELL?-If you can't you
ought to learn how! And if you can,
you can earn big money selling TIME
and LIFE at the reduced student
rates. Phone 2-82-42 for more infor-
mation. )
MALE MUSIC STUDENT-To do tutor-
ing for room and board. Apply 217
S. Fifth Avenue after 3 p.m. )81L
SALESLADY-Experienced in ready-to-
wear. Full and part time. References
from your previous employer request-
ed. Apply in person. The Budget
Shop, 611 E. Liberty. )7H
CAD DCW~LE

BUSINESSSERVICES
HOMECOMING DISPLAY and Campu4
photos for sale. Get some snaps of
your Halloween party. Photo Xmas
Cards. A. D. Reid. Phone 6083. )25B
SHORTHAND and 'General Typingr,
Manuscripts-Theses-Cbrrespondence
Call 2-8026 or 2-6416. )24B
WASHING and/or ironing done in my
own home. Free pick-up and delivery
Phone 2-9020. _)1B
SHIRTS-Nine hour service (by re
quest) three day service (regular serv-
ice. Ace Laundry, 1116 S. University
21B
EFFICIENT, EXPERT-prompt type-
writer repair service. Mosely's Type-
writer and Supply Company. 214 E.
Washington. Phone 5888. )5B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Co., 215 E.
Liberty. )16B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
Established Tradition )3B
or< PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
Van Doren Clarinet Reeds
Box of 25-$4.50
New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washington )4B
GREETING CARDS inscribed in colors.
10c each or $1.00 per box. J. A. Early,
402 Observatory. Phone 2-8606. )8B
TED SMITH ORCHESTRA
Open dates-Nov. 4, 5, 11,18, 19, 25, 26
Phone 3-1004 )23B
TYPING
Pickup and Delivery Service, 2-1282
)22B
PHOTO-ENGRAVING
24-hour service at Reasonable Charges
On High Quality Engraving
Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard
Phone 2-3241
WANTED TO BUY
TWO NON-STUDENT TICKETS for the
Purdue game. Call Betty Strasser at

famous fashioned
Rayon Crepe

I

SLIP

Jacobson's Own
Skrai-o"'h erNYLONS

/-

Luxury l gerie at a
low-and-behold price

#I

395

y . ....'
}.. :-:a-
hi; ,
Y .
r'i+:7

1 95

^'.. Box 3 pr.,
r.

,5.65

i
I

A pointed midriff
with the exact dress
measure fit Skylon is
famous for. The
bodice is deep in lace,
ruffles the hem. With
adjustable straps.
White, pink, black.
Sizes 12 to 20.

60-Gauge
1 -Deniej

4

Ultra-Sheer First Quality

U.

,

III

I

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