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October 22, 1949 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1949

11D TO BETTER LIVING:
Later Years Course Aids Older People

Adults who wish to learn how to
live their older years in a satisfy.
ing, useful and healthful manner
may take an extension course, Liv-
ing in Later Years.
It is a course designed for oldel
people, and points the way to a
later life that is a gratifying ex-
perience instead of a barren pe-
riod of inactivity and uselessness.
* * *
IT HELPS prevent the malad-
justments of later years by pre-
paring for a more constructive
and a happier life.
Extension Service presents
the course in cooperation with
the Institute of Human Adjust-
ment. The series of lectures and
discussions is divided into two
eight-week sections which to-
gether form a complete unit.
Similar courses are being given
in Bay City, Jackson, Grand Rap-
ids and Detroit.
In a discussion of the psycho-
logical aspects of the aging proc-
ess, Dr. Wilma Donahue, coordi-
nator of the series, said, "The
mental organs of an individual are
the longest living organisms of the
human body. It is up to the in-
dividual to keep mentally active,
and thus to feel alive and be use-
ful."
DR. DONAHUE made it clear
that many personality changes
take place because of physical
changes in the individual, such as
loss of hearing or sight.
Contrary to many opinions,]
older people are not necessarily]
more forgetful or harder to get
along with than those of the
other age groups. "Memory of;
older people should be just as
keen as that of younger people
if there are no physiologicala
reasons for this decrease in
memory," Dr. Donahue declared.
"Many older persons neglect to
stimulate the brain and therefore
seem to be becoming less intelli-
gent and less efficient in mental
fields. However, continued use of

IL

'T *

*;

COORDINATES OLDER PEOPLE'S COURSES - Dr. Wilma
Donahue, left, coordinates courses given in several cities on living
in later years by the University Extension Service and the Institute
of Human Adjustment. Here she talks with a pupil in one of the
courses.
* * * * '

the brain keeps it at its peak of
efficiency," she added.
*. * *
YOUNGER PERSONS often be-
lieve that they should help older
persons in every way possible. One
of the worst things that can hap-
pen to an older person is to have
someone do all the work. "Not
having to do any work often makes
an older person settle back into a
useless, and therefore unhappy,
world," Dr. Donahue said.
"Losses in efficiency usually
occur only in the physical realm;
mental activities should make
up for the loss of physical ac-
tivities," according to Dr. Dona-
hue.

ACADEMIC RAT RACE:
Prof. Shepard Claims Rats
Learn Just as Fast as People

Future lectures in the series will
consider Mental Hygiene of Old
Age, Living and Housing Prob-
lems of Older People, En'iployment
and Social Security and Religion
and Religious Observances.
* * *
SPEAKERS included in the se-
ries are such experts as Dr. Dona-
hue, who is a research psychologist
at the Institute for Human Ad-
justment and a lecturer in psy-
chology at the University; Dr.
Moses M. Frohlich, professor of
psychiatry in charge of Veteran's
Readjustment Center; and Prof.
Ralph Fletcher, of the Institute of
Social Work at the University.
Research on
Brain Aids
Eye Defects
Research is aiding in the loca-
tion of certain kinds of brain de-
struction that cause abnormal eye
movements, according to Dr. Eliza-
beth C. Crosby.
Dr. Crosby, professor of anat-
omy, gave the first annual Max
M. Peet lecture at University Hos-
pital yesterday. Dr. Peet was head
of the neurosurgery department
before his death in March.
* * *
IN A PAPER entitled "The Ap-
plication of Neuroanatomical Data
to the Diagnosis of Selected Neur-
ological and Neurosurgical Cases,"
Dr. Crosby showed how research1
on the anatomy of the brain and
its nervous system is of use in
diagnosing causes of certain ab-
normal eye movements.
"The clinical fields themselves
must supply the final tests for
the application of the neuroana-
tomical data," Dr. Crosby said.

Atom Effects
Surveyed By
'U' Professor
Report Victims'
Blood Unaffected
Blood of Hiroshima survivors
now shows little difference from
that of Japanese living in a neigh-
boring town, according to a re-
port co-authored by Dr. James V.
Neel, University professor of in-
ternal medicine.
The report, dealing with the ef-
fects of the atom bomb, appears
in the current issue of "Archives
of Internal Medicine."
THE ARTICLE was written by
Dr. Neel, who is also associate
geneticist at the University's Lab-
oratory of Vertebrate Biology, and
Dr. Frederick Snell, of the Brook-
line Board of Health Hospital,
Chestnut Hill, Mass.
The reported study was made
between March 1947 and April
1948 under the auspices of the
Atomic Bomb Casualty Commis-
sion of the National Research
Council.
Dr. Neel was acting director of
the commission and Dr. Snell, then
a Navy lieutenant, was assigned
to work on the commission.
Studies were made on 924 Hiro-
shima residents who had suffered
loss of hair at the time of the
bombing, an indication of epo-
sure to large doses of radioactive
waves.
STUDIES WERE also made of
935 residents of the city of Kure,
18 miles away.
"These studies have revealed
only a very slight reduction of
the red blood cell count in the
Hiroshima residents," Dr. Neel
reports.
"This could be an effect of the
atomic bombing, but nutritional
differences between the two
groups could have been a factor."
Studies conducted by commis-
sion immediately after the bomb-
ing had revealed that many of
persons wholosthair were also
anemic, Dr. Neel said.
* * *
"IT MAY BE presumed that
many of the people had made on
almost complete recovery from
anemia in the interval between
the two studies," he added.
Approximately 16,000 screen-
ing questionnaires were used in
locating the study group in Hiro-
shima.
Persons studied in Kure were
selected in such a manner that in
age and sex the sample was nearly
identical with the Hiroshima
group. A large percent were school
children, Dr. Neel explained.
Once an individual was select-
ed for observation, Dr. Neel con-
tinued, a detailed history with
emphasis on the individual's posi-
tion at the time of the explosion,
signs and symptoms of radiation
sickness and associated shock, was
obtained by a trained interpreter.
Varsity Night
Seeks Capable
Entertainers
The biggest and most popular
variety show on campus-Varsity
Night-is in need of top-flight en-
tertainers.

Whether you whistle "Dixie"
backwards or play the violin like
Heifetz, you are eligible to make
an appointment for a Varsity
Night audition.
APPOINTMENTS for auditions
may be made by calling 3-1511
extension 2114, at any time during
the day. They will be held Oct. 25
and 27 in Harris Hall.
Varsity Night, sponsored by
the University bands, will be
staged Nov. 18 at Hill Audito-
rium. It is to provide entertain-
ment for the pre-game Ohio
State football crowds.
Always drawing large audiences,
Varsity Night has been a perennial
favorite at the University for
many years.
The University concert band
supplies the backbone of the- show,
playing popular tunes of today
and yesterday, with several stu-
dent and professional acts provid-
ing diversity and rounding out the
program.

Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays, MOTORCYCLISTS
S11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue. B111TISI POUNI DEVALUED
__..FO _SALEn wsAVE $195.00
___A EOther Selling for Storage Plus
-- Repair Bills.
CAMERA FIENDS-New low prices on Buy Now! Save Now!
color prints. Kodachrome prints and INDIA MOTORCYCLE SALES
enlargements 2X-55c, 3X-75c, 5x7- 207 w. Liberty - Phone 2-1748
$2.25. 8x10-$4.75. CALKINS-FLETCH- Open EvenIng 'T'ill 9:00
ER at S. STATE and N. UNIVERSITY _ --
is your headquarters for color photog- .45 1'. DIAMOND engagemeot r;ng.
raphy. Start your year right. Geta Call 703 )84
U. of M. Scrapbook-$2.95. )5 SPENCER icroscope. 10 and 45 power
COUSIN'S lenses, v;itl eae. Excellent condition.
On StateStreet 2-1600. )24
NECKTIE SCARVES *TINY COLORFUL finches, 5.95 a pr.
Assorted rayon, silk, wool jersey, Canaries, Parakeets. Cocketiels. Java
and velvet. 59c - $1.00. )2 Ricebirds. 562 S. 7th St. Ph. 5330.
RECORDS-12 albums of classical re- --- -- )2B
cordings, slightly used. Cali 3-112527 FOR RENT
MAN'S BICYCLE-New tires. $15. 1011 EXCEPTIONALLY nc urnished ap -
E.Uiest.)5 ment west of Stadium for Grad.
HALLICRAFTER Sky Champion radio student wishing peace and quiet. Call
receiver set. Phone Karl Spee. 9293 Mis. Reed, 6197. )14F
ONE MAN'S and one lady's bicycle. $12 ARE YOU HAPPY where you're living?
_each. Phone 2-4676._ )26 See this. 2 'vacancies. Student's (mien)
PASSENGER COUPE - Chev. 1942 Club. Separate liiIng-study room. 217
grey, special deluxe, radio, heater, S. 5th Ave. after 3. )12F
seat covers. Tires, motor and body A PIANO STUD1O. New Baldwin organ.
in good condition. 517 E. Wash., Apt. (practice). Rent by week or month.
6. Phone 2-8870 after 5. )16 217 S. 5th Ave. _)13F
1937 TERRAPLANE--Tudor, heater. In WHITMORE LAKE---2 -apartments fol
pretty good condition. Would like rent. One 2-room and private tile
about $100 cash or terms. 9179 after bath, furnished, $65 per month. Ont
5 p.m. ______)19 3 room and private tile bath, fuirnlsh.
EXCHANGE-2 main floor tickets Tues- ed, $85 per month. Baths and floor,
day Boston Symphony Concert for 2 are new. Oil heat and hot water
similar for Sunday. Ph. 5519 )28 furniture good. Not a cottage, s
_-EAUTIFUL.new_ modern, good home. Must see to appreciate
BATIFULnelog cabin, d 42 E. Shore Drive, Whitmore Lake.
located in Glenbrook subdivision, )111~
Half Moon Lake, partly furnished. __
Phone owner, 8320. )98ROOM AND BOARD
ONE BEAT UP BICYCLE. George _
Washington original. Call up and HOME COOKING-Meals for men. 1319
haggle. Bob 2-0197. )29 Hill. )7X

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Phone 23-24-1j
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
3 .60 1.53 2.52
4 .80 2.04 4.80
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except

FOR SALE
I<OR SALE- TIME ON MY HANDS--
have sold centuries of it already, but
have eons more available. Buy a year
of TIME from us now at the reduced
student rate of $4.75( instead of $6.00)
Phone 2-82-42 for your share. )3
CORONA SILENT PORTABLE - Like
new. Original ownier. Cost $95; will
sell for $65. 109 N. 'rityi'. Apt. 3 ):0
STOCK REDUCTION SALE
All wool blankets. $3.99; men's briefs,
39c:* Navy "T" shirts, 3 for $1.35
tanker jackets, $6.66; N.1 jackets,
$7.77; 60 per cent wool athletic hose,
39c; men's zipper galoshes, $3.33. Open
'til 6:30 pim. Sam's Store, 122 Wash-
ington. )6

PERSONAL
I 'RSON AL SERVICE Aniythintg at-
tempe fr a e. 'us""il jobs a
speciaity. Ph. 2-6 54- -Dave or Sandy.,
)30P

VIOLA STAIN--Experienced legal typ-
ing 2-9348, Apt. 2. 344 S. Division.
)19P
CHL D CAR Eduring ames by student
otiers. Ph. 2-8787 or 2-7476. 18P
TROUBLE SHOOTER IN PENMANSHIP.
Come in any time betweenu 10 and
7, Monday through Saturday for
your two free lessons in writing. Then
decide whether you care to continue
at $1.00 per hour for further in-
struction. J. A. Early, 402 Observatory,
Ph. 2-8606. )8B-
LEARN TO DANCE
JIMIE HUNT DANCE STUDIO
209 8 1;.,.te t Ph. 8361
)1P
THE
Lord Ca rI eton
SEXTET
Now accepting bookings. Call Ray,
402 COey l use. EastQuad. )14P
UNSIGH1TLY HAiR removed perma-
nently. Short wave method ap-
proved by Am. Med. Ass'n., 5 Nickels
Arcade Ph. 2-6696. )12B
LOST ANDFOUND
LOST-Gold watch and chain with keys
attached, on Oct. 18, near 206 W.
Engineering Bldg., at noon. Phone
Prof. Chenea, Univ. Ext. 2467. }43L
}SLACK LEATfHER key case with in-
itials IH-K. Return to Stockwell. Rmn.
4543. )41L
LOST -Dark rii glasses. Campus vi-
cinity Tuesday. Call 2-4471. Rnm. 5019.
) 40L
FEMALE ENGLISH SETTER-5 months
old, predominantly white with black
ears and eye markings, black spots
on body and brown on legts. Reward
ofred. Notify John Gwin, phone
3-il35 at aniy time.__ __ }_35L
TRANSPORTATION
WANTI PASSENGER to share aide to
Mass. or vicinity leaving Monday or
Tuesday. Call Flo or leave message
at 2-5587. )9T
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED-3 tickets OSU game. Call
2-3741. )16W

PAUL'S M4USICAL REPAIR
Van Doren Clarinet Reeds
Box of 25-$4.50
New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washiington .

,) -4
ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOM and board for working college
graduate or student in graduate
league house. Automatic washing fa-
cilities. Ph. 8+891. ) 241t
SINGLE ROOM for male st udent aclross
from . Engineering Building 535
Church St. Call after 6. -8.13.. ):?3R
ROOMS-Redecorated. Autnit but
water. 2 blocks from campus. 120 N.
Ingalls. )22R
BRING YOUR weekend guests to the
Pierce Transient Home, except, for the
Minnesota weekend. 1133 East Ann,
Phone8144. )16R
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED-LEARN AND GAIN
EXPERIENCE at the four main parts
of the successful sales talk.Bi
profits for you by selling TIE and
LIFE. Student Periodical Agency.
2-82-42.
GRADUATE registered Nurse. General
duties. 3 to 11 shift. Salary $3,000 yr.
Saline General Hospital, Saline, Mich.
Phone 115. (54

CLASSIFIED *ADVERTISING

BUSINESS SERVICES
TYPING
PIckup and Delivery Scrvice. 2-1282
SPECIAL ON BOOKPLATES
As many or as few as you wish at Sc
each. Your books need an I.D. card
too. Let Early wrtite them for you.
Hours 10 to 7 Mon. tin. Sat. .J. A.
Early, 402 Obrvatory, 1Ph. 2-8606;U.
SHIRTS-Niie Hour Service (by re-
quest). 3-day service (regular serv-
ice). Ace Laundry, 1116 S. UnIivers<ity.
2113
EFFICIENT, expert, prompt typewriter
repair service. Mosely's Typewriter
and Supply Company. 214 E. Wash-
ington. Ph. 5888. ) 5Bt
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaiird by
the Office Equipment Service C;o, 2133
E. Liberty. )161
WASHING and/ or Ironing,;. - ina in my
own home. Free pick-up ant delivery.
Ph. 2-9020. ) 1 1
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 B. Washngliton
Expert Alterations
Ctetorn Clothes
Established Tradition

d

0.d

Riding Horses For Hire

I

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ii ,Nr.~k, rsA ,, V .1.1Cn1A

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ps am-

EXCEPTIONALLY FINE
NEW HORSES
Instructions Available
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Golfside Stables
GENE BLAND, Mgr.
3250 E. Huron River Dr. Ph. 7772

f '

ENDING TONIGHT

----a

TODAY ONLY!
at 1:30 - 4:45 - 7:25 - 10:00

)3B

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I

By VERNON EMERSON
Some rats learn more rapidly
than some people; then again
some people learn more rapidly
than some rats.
"I would not venture to say
which of the two animals learns
mgre quickly than the other,"
Prof. John F. Shepard of the psy-
chology department stated.
PROF. SHEPARD said that if
a close comparison of trials in
which the two had participated
Psych Group
Meets Monday
The Psychology Colloquium,
graduate psychology discussion
group, will hold its second meet-
ing at 3:30 Monday in the Lane
Hall basement.
Prof. E. L. Kelly, Prof. Max
Hutt and Prof. Edward Bordin, all
of the psychology department, will
give reports on the meeting of the
American Psychological Associa-
tion held at Boulder, Colo this
summer.
The discussion will be directed
toward the clinical aspect of psy-
chology. Clinical psychology is
the field of work of each of the
speakers.
Following meetings will feature
discussions on the roles of social
psychology and therapeutic psy-
chology.;

I

were made the results would prob-
ably show that they were equal.
Ile has worked with a good
number of both types in the past
years. Altogether, he has studied
326 rats.
The tests which were of the
maze type were designed to de-
termine the rapidity of the learn-
ing of the animals.
"Rats show some reasoning abil-
ity," he said. When placed in the
maze for the second time some
rats were quick to remember short
cuts that were arranged for them
the first time through.
* * *
THE MAIN difficulty in test-
ing humans was that they knew
that they were being experimented
with and were on their guard,
Prof. Shepard said.
"The people would often find
their way out and then go back
to explore, but the rats, once
out, concentrated on the food
that was their goal."
Prof. Shepard stated that al-
though people did not appear to
be slower in finding short cuts in
the maze, they did not show any
superiority over the rats.
At the present time Prof. Shep-
ard is compiling the results of his
experiments in a book.
Building Costs Reduced
During the last year the cost of
building a home dropped 9.3 per
cent from the peak of September,
1948, on a national average.

EXTRA
BUGS
BUNNY
Does His Best with
Penguins in
"FRIGID HARE"

I

She pointed out that research
can benefit most from an oppor-
tunity to work closer with the
clinical field in order to gain more
information about the problems
they can help solve.
DR. CROSBY also paid tribute
to the late Dr. Peet, calling him
"an outstanding example of a
neurosurgeon whose experience
was great enough and whose vision
was broad enough to enable him
to draw from related fields those
facts which enriched his know-
ledge and aided in the advance-
ment of his profession."
Rheumatic Fever
Discussed Here
Although the major cause of
death in children between five and
19 years old, rheumatic fever is
frequently not recognized by its
symptoms, Dr. Henry Poncher,
professor of pediatrics at the Uni-
versity of Illinois, said yesterday.
Speaking in the Rackham Am-
phitheatre as the fifth annual
David M. Cowie lecturer, Poncher
said the classical diagnostic fea-
tures of the disease have been
known for 100 years.

p SUNDAY 7
CA t'! 'Y GRANT
in
"I Was A Male War Bride"

Wayne Morris " Janis Paige
BRUCE BENNETT - GERALDINE BROOKS
ROBERT HUTTON - ALAN HALE
Plus! at 3:40 - 6:20 - 9:00 P.M.
S PENNY ARTHUR3
SINGLETON LAKE
and A.S.SP.A.
LEE J. COBB-star of
Arthur Miller's
"Death of A Salesman"
ARTHUR KENNEDY-of
"All My Sons"
"Death of A Salesman"
KARL MALDIN-"Mitch""
"Streetcar Named Desire"
ED BEGLEY-the father in
"All My Sons"

4

Authorized by the
Michigan Public Service Commission to
Operate Between Ann Arbor and Willow Run
PHONE 4244
24-HOUR SERVICE
CABS AVAILABLE FOR CHARTER

11

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MEN'S GLEE CLIUB presents..

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Continuous from I P.M.
Ig
-. LAST TIMES TODAY -
NIH NT
LINDFOR
-STARTS SU NDAY-

.

WERE DISCOVERED
IN

.

HIS GOLDEN
SAXOPHONE

w

ORPH EUM TODAY
Cinema Triumphs and 'unchy
From All The World Continuous from 1 :30 P.M.
ARTKNO presents
the first Leemian Post-War Film in COLOR

Stu1dent
Directory

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a and
FAMOUS ORCHESTRA
follCar CONCERT

Directed by Elia Kazan,
who directed "All My Sons,"
"Streetcar Named Desire."
Produced by

-Y

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