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September 21, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i'v WE B'NE SDAY, SEPT. 21, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE F M-,:,

PE Handbook Prepared, Appointees Named

_

Dr. Bell Finds
Success Open
To 'U' Grads
"Coed graduates of the Univer-
sity's professional school of phys-
ical education are outstanding as
a group in my opinion," said Dr.
Margaret Bell, chairman of the
Program of Physical Education for
Women.
"Since 1925 we haven't had
more than two or three grad-
uates we couldn't heartily recom-
mend," she added.
Statistics indicate that nation-
ally there is an oversupply of
physical education teachers but
here Dr. Bell stated that she re-
ceives more requests for Michigan
. graduates than she can even begin
to fill. And these job offers all
list high wages, the average pay
ranging from $2,800 to $3,500.
Therefore as well as being a
very interesting profession, it is
also a highly paid one.
Contrary to popular opinion it
takes a better than average stu-
dent rather than a poorer one to
make a go of physical education,
Dr. Bell said. So many persons are
quick to label physical education a
"snap" when they know little
about the full curriculum which
includes many hours of sciences,
she continued.
This year women wishing to
concentrate in physical education
will not specialize in their fresh-
man year as was formerly done.
They will fulfill the University's
requirements and get their prere-
quisites, but will not start con-
centrating until their sophomore
year.
There is an unlimited demand
i- for graduates with bachelor's,
master's and doctor's degrees in
the field. Women interested in
concentration should write to Dr.
Laurie Campbell or inquire in
person at the School of Education
during orientation week.
Dean
Bromage
(Continued from Page 1)
the Dean of Women can point
out to you special help in case
of need.
"We want your ideas and your
contributions to campus life be-
cause a good share of what our
University is today is what the
* students during the past one hun-
dred years and more have made
it.
* * *
"BUT YOU ARE coming because
you want the University's tradi-
tions of democratic control, of
free interchange of ideas, and of
congenial company. All of these
things you are seeking or you
would not have chosen the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
"The very diversity of our
eeampus community is the surest
way of learning today's science
of human relations.
"It is because education, not
wealth or high birth or power, is
the touchstone of prestige in
American society that we are a
truly democratic nation. This
prestige the University has in
store for you.
"EDUCATION IS NOT some-
thing which is given, even by a
great and diversified University
with its myriad resources; educa-
tion is something you acquire for
yourself.

"Bring your own scale of
values and be prepared to re-
tain that independence of jud-
gment prized pre-eminently by
youth.
"What you will learn here about
your life's work, your lasting
friends and associations, the es-
thetic enjoyment of books, mu-
sic, and art - all this will end
for you in a Commencement four
years from now: a commencement
of life-long service because the
University will have opened to
you the means of self-realization."
Ratty Place
MALAGA, N.M.-Bat paradise is
located in Carlsbad Caverns, N.M.,
where five million bats fly out
at sundown, according to those
who know bats best.
The caverns are also occupied
by blind fish and other sightless
creatures.
i L 'Al

Coed Stronghold

Guide Includes History Sketch;
Lists Michigan Athletic Facilities

A preliminary informational.
iandbook for freshman coeds has
been prepared by the Department
of Physical Education for women.
The handbook gives a complete
history of physical education for
women at the University since
1897 when the first woman physi-
cal education instructor was ap-
pointed. Barbour Gymnasium was
constructed in that same year
with facilities for 200 girls. Today
five times that number are ac-
commodated in classes alone.
Also included is general infor-
mation about the present set-up
of the department. The physical
education program at Michigan
is divided into three units: the re-
quired program for entering fresh-
men, the teacher education pro-
gram for women entering physical
education as a career and the rec-
reational program for all women
students interested in extra-cur-
ricular activities.
BETWEEN 1100 and 1200 stu-
dents participate annually in the
required program which is ar-
ranged according to the needs of
each freshman woman after a
complete physical examination
and individual conferences. Phy-
sical fitness tests and corrective
work is included in this program.
Every season more than 300
women apply for non-credit in-
struction, but due to lack of
space and teachers many of
them are disappointed. If there
are any openings in the classes
these women are given careful
consideration, but freshmen still
hold priority.
Elective activities range from
the nineteen organized sports
clubs sponsored by the Women's
Athletic Association to self initi-
ated activities. The WAA sports

clubs are managed by women who
have petitioned for the positions
and are open to all coeds, includ-
ing first-semester freshmen.
A NEW SWIMMING pool, which
will be part of a physical educa-
tion building to be built south of
the Women's Athletic Building
is included in the department's
future hopes.
New staff members this fall
include M. Spears, B.S. and
M.A., assistant supervisor in the
physical education department.
Others include Lois Dungan
Redd, B.S., M.A., who will assume
the position of assistant supervis-
or of physical education; and Val-
erie Turner, B.S., who will assist
in dancing.
Michifish Slate
Tryouts, Meet
Tryouts for the women's swim-
ming club, Michifish, will be held
on Oct. 22 and 29 for all new
members.
Meetings will then take place
from 10 until 11 a.m. every Satur-
day at the Union Pool.
The annua lcampus swimming
meet put on with the aid of this
group will be held Tuesday, Oct.
18 for all coeds who wish to par-
ticipate.
Counselors
One of the most unusual clubs
under WAA is for women who
have been or want to be counselors
at a summer camp.
Following the organizational
meeting at 5 p.m., Oct. 3 at the
WAB, there will be bike-hikes,
cook-outs, song fests, handicraft,
singing games, rainy day games
and discussions.

The Campus Churches
Welcome You !
Activities for Church Night (Sept. 23)
the Friday of Orientation Week
and for Registration Weekend ...

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 2-0085
Rev. Edward H. Redman

Friday, September 23
6:30 P.M.: Dinner.
Sunday, September 25
11:00 A.M.: Worship Service. Sermon
Mr. Redman: "In Days to Come."
6:30 P.M.: Student Group Meeting.

by

MICHIGAN MECCA-The Women's League, shown above, is the
center of all coed activities, social, recreational and governing.
Equipped with dining rooms, study halls, lounges, rehearsal rooms
and offices, the League stands as a second home away from home
for many University women and men as well although traditionally
a stronghold of the fair sex.
YE OLDE SPIRIT:
Alumnae Still Loyal, Active

Although alumnae of the Uni-
versity have been active since the
first coed graduated in 1871, they
did not organize into a group until
1917.
Not only was the University one
of the first large universities to
become coeducational but it was;
the first to be represented at an
early national alumnae conference
sponsored by the Association of
Collegiate Alumnae, now known as
the American Association of Uni-
versity women.
In the year 1917 the Central
Correspondence Committee began
directing work "to do more for
Michigan women and to stand by
all interests and achievements of
the University as expressed
through her Alumnae Association.
* * *
THE FIRST project undertaken;
by the alumnae was the purchase
of a self-help house on Washtenaw
Ave. maintained by women stu-
dents and known as Alumnae
House. In 1926 the Regents ac-
quired the residence which is the
present Mary Markley House.
With the continued growth of
alumnae throughout the coun-
try, the name Central Corres-
pondence Committee was no
longer repi.senitative of that
organization's function. Accord-

ingly in 1920 it became known
as the Alumnae Council of
Alumni Association.
Headquarters for alumnae as
well as all women's organizations
were housed in Barbour Gymna-
sium until 1928. The Women's
League began a drive for a separ-
ate women's building in 1921 and
the Alumnae Council campaigned
for $1,000,000.
* * *
WHEN HALF the sum had been
raised the Regents donated the
land on which the building now
stands and in June, 1929, the for-
mal dedication took place.
Among the permanent projects
of the Council is a program of stu-
dent aid based on awarding of
current scholarships and fellow-
ships and the establishment of
permanent endowments in $10,000
units as basic funds for graduate
fellowships.
Love for Babies
LOVESICK, Mo.-A child wants
evidence of being loved, just like
an adult, according to psychia-
trists.
This is especially true when the
child is lonesome, sick, or un-
happy.

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YOUNG FRIENDS FELLOWSHIP
Lane Hall
William Walton (In Charge of Program)
Francis Evans-Phone 2-8501
Marian Gyr-Phone 2-2607
Sunday, September 25
11:00 A.M.: Worship Meeting-Lane Hall.
12:30 P.M.: Picnic-Meet at Lane Hall.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Phone 2-4763
Rev. Frank J. McPhillips
Rev. John F. Bradley
Friday, September 23
8:00-12:00 P.M.: Open House.
Sunday, September 25
Masses at 8, 9:30, 11 and 12 o'clock.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and E. William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Student Directors-Rev. H. L. Pickerill,
Miss Jean Gree
Music-Wayne Dunlap, J. Bertram Strickland
Sunday, September 25
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship.
6:00 P.M.; Student Guild supper and
program.
The Guild House, 438 Maynard Street
Tuesday Tea, 4:30-6:30.
Friday, September 23
5:30 P.M.: Freshman Supper, Congregational
Church.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Of The Christian Reformed Church)
Washtenaw Avenue at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
1236 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 4332
Friday, September 23
5:00 P.M.: Open House and "Koffie Teut",
all evening.
Sunday, September 25
10:00 A.M.: Service.
7:30 P.M.: Service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron Street-Phone 7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counselor
Miss Faith Whitnall, Associate Counselor
Friday, September 23
6:00 P.M.: Freshman Steak Fry-Guild
Garden.
Sunday, September 25
10:00 A.M.: Student Bible Class-"The Old
Tetsament."
11:00 A.M.: Church Worship.
Sermon, "Religious Priority."
6:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild-Food and
Fellowship. Student Panel, "Don't Miss It!"
Wednesday, September 28
4:30-6:00 - Midweek Informal Tea and
"Chat."
WESLEY FOUNDATION
First Methodist Church
Corner of Sate and Huron Streets
Phone 6881
Dr. James Brett Kenna, Director Sudent Work
Friday, September 23
6:00 P.M.: Orientation Supper and Party
following.
Sunday, September 25
11:45 A.M.: Worship Service.
5:30 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild Meeting-Dr.
James Brett Kenna, Speaker.
THE ORTHODOX STUDENTS SOCIETY
St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church
414 North Main St.-Phone 2-3676 or 2-1744
Dr. S. M. Sophocles
Mr. Gus Betros, Assistant
Friday, September 23
7:00 P.M.: Welcome Banquet.
Saturday, September 24
8:00 P.M.: Dance.
Sunday, September 25
Special Student Mass-Bishop Germanos
officiating.
WESTMINSTER GUILD
First Presbyterian Church
Washtenaw Near South University Ave.
Dr. W. P. Lemon
Rev. William Henderson, Assistant
Friday, September 23
6:00 P.M.: Outdoor Supper at Council Ring
followed by "Welcome Party."
Sunday, September 25
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper in Social Hall.
6:30 P.M.: Guild Meeting-"The Mark of a
Christian Student,,' William H. Henderson.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES GUILD

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Upper Room, Lane Hall
Professor . F. Kessler, Faculty Advisor
Tuesdays-7:30 P.M.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets-Phone 2-1121
Rev. Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
Friday, September 23
7:00-10:00 P.M.: Open House at Grace
Bible Church.
Sunday, September 25
10:00 A.M.: University Bible Class at Grace
Bible Church.
6:15 P.M.: Cost Supper served at Church.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
2101 Hill Street-Phone 4120 and 4129
Rabbi Rerschel Lyman, Director of Student
Work
Friday, September 23
8:00 P.M.: Rosh Rashanah Services in Lydia
Mendelssohn Auditorium.
Sunday, September 25
10:00 A.M.: Rosh Hashanah Services in Lydia
Mendelssohn Auditorium.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Avenue
Phone 8498
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale, Pastor
Rev. Walter S. Press, Pastor
Friday, September 23
6:00 P.M.: Welcome Supper for
New Students.
Sunday, September 25
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service.
5:30 P.M.: Student Guild Meeting.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 5560
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Friday, September 23
6:00 P.M.: Dinner and Evening for New
Students, sponsored by the Student Council
Saturday, September 24
4:15 P.M.: "Open House" after the Football
Game.
Sunday, September 25
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service in New Chapel.
5:30 P.M.: Supper and Program of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
Sunday, September 25
10:15 A.M.: Morning Worship
Nursery for children during the service.
Guild House, 438 Maynard St.
H. L. Pickerill, Director
Jean Garee, Associate
Tuesday Tea, 4:30-6:00
Friday, September 23
5:30 P.M.: Freshman Supper, Congregational
Church.
Sunday, September 25
6:00 P.M.: Supper and program, Congrega-
tional Church.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
WESTMINSTER GUILD
1432 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 2-4466
Dr. W. P. Lemon, Director.of Student Work
Rev. W. H. Henderson, Assistant Director
Friday, September 23
6:00 P.M.: Outdoor Supper-Council Ring
on Church Grounds.
Sunday, Septemberd25
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Dr. Lemon
will preach the sermon.
4:00 P.M.: Informal Tea and Reception for
New Students in the Lewis-Vance Parlors.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division Street-Phone 2-4097
Rev. John Burt, Chaplain
Mrs. Mary P. Gwin, Counselor for Women
Friday, September 23
6:00 P.M.: Supper for Freshmen and Transfer
Students at Canterbury House, 218 North
Division St.
Sunday, September 25
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion followed by
Student Breakfast.
11:00 A.M., Morning Prayer and Sermon.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club.
STUDENT RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATION

Inter-Faith Program
Lane Hall-University Religious Center
204 South State Street
Daily During Orientation Week
2:00-5:30 P.M.: Open House.
Saturday, September 24
8:00 P.M.: Orientation Party.

...........................

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MILLER'S
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Guild House-438 Maynard St.-Phone 5838
Rev. H. L. Pickerill, Director
Miss Jean Garee, Associate
Friday, September 23
5:30 P.M.: Freshman Supper and Program
at Congregational Church.

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Forest at Hill Street-Phone 7622
National Lutheran Council
Rev. Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
Friday, September 23
6:00 P.M.: Freshman Supper and Entertain-
ment at the Student Center, 1304 Hill St.
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