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October 12, 1949 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-12

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sI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1949

_.

SEASON OPENER:
Italian Farce To Be Given
By Speech Department
r"

The speech department has
chosen an Italian farce for its first
production of the fall season.
"The Servant of Two Masters,"
which will be presented from Oct.
26 to 29 at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, is a play in the Comme-
dia dell Arte manner of the tradi-
tional Italian theatre.
*. * *
WRITTEN IN 1743 by the Ital-
ian playwright Carlo Goldoni, the
plot centers around a comic situ-
ation which arises when a servant
hires himself out to two masters
and confuses the orders, letters,
and money of one master with the
other.
The role of Truffaldino, the
International
Center Plans
MedicalTalks
International Center will spon-
sor a series of eight medical round-
tables to make available to stu-
dents and faculty recent discov-
eries in medical research and the
related fields, according to Homer
E. Underwood, Supervisor of Ac-
tivities.
The Roundtable will meet at 8
p.m. on the first and third Tues-
days of the month.
MEMBERS OF THE faculty will
be invited to speak on assigned
topics. Following the talks, the
chairman will lead the group in an
informal discussion of the subject
of the evening. Movies and slides
will be used as lecture aids.
Students of medicine, phar-
macy, bio-chemistry and psy-
chology are especially urged to
avail themselves of this oppor-
tunity, said Underwood.
The first session of the round-
table will meet Oct. 18. Dr. Jo-
sepha Meinecke, lecturer in the
history of medicine will lead a
discussion on medical internation-
alism.

servant, will be played by Stan
Challis. Challis appeared last
year in "Abe Lincoln in Illinois"
and "Ah, Wilderness." He has
also acted in numerous other
plays, one-acts and University
radio shows.
Margaret Pell is cast as Beatrice,
one of the masters. Miss Pell
played Mary Todd in "Abe Lin-
coln in Illinois," Vinnie in "Life
with Father," and Cassandra in
"Trojan Women." She also had
roles in "Summer Solstice" and
"Tovarich."
* * *
DICK RIFENBURG will play
Florindo, the other master and
male romantic lead of the play.
Rifenburg, football All-American,
is a newcomer to Play Production,
but has two radio programs on
sports previews, which he writes
himself.
Other members of the cast in-
clude Betty Ellis, Betty Lou Rob-
inson, Allan Balter, James Rea-
son, James White, Irving
Deutsch, William Taylor, John
Waller, William Mackenzie and
Albert Johnson.
Prof. William P. Halstead of the
speech department is directing the
play. John Sargent is assistant to
the director and Ann Husselman
is stage manager. The set is de-
signed by Jack Bender and the
costumes by Barbara Hamel, both
of the speech department.
Opening date for mail orders
will be announced later.
Union To Hold
Coffee Hours
The first of a series of student-
faculty coffee hours will be held
at 4 p.m. today in the Terrace
Room of the Union.
Today's honored guests are the
students and faculty of the Eng-
lish Department.
The coffee hours are sponsored
by the Union in an effort to en-
able students and faculty mem-
bers to get acquainted on an in-
formal basis and discuss their mu-
tual problems over a cup of
coffee.
Subsequent coffee hours will
honor other departments of the
University. These will be an-
nounced in classes, on bulletin
boards and in The Daily.

a -Daily-Roger Reinke
DONATES MEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITU - su«Lian S.
Kresge (right), founder of the Kresge Foundation, is shown seated
with Dr. Albert C. Furstenberg, dean of the School of Medicine at a
dinner meeting Monday night when it was announced that the
Foundation has given the University $3,000,000 for a new Medical
Research Institute. (See Story, P.1.)
DATELINE EUROPE:
People of Europe Look
To U.S. for Leadership

Cancer Can
Be Reduced
Says Miller
Dr. Norman F. Miller said yes-
terday that death from certain
cancers can be practically elim-
inated.
Dr. Miller chairman of the ob-
stetrics and gynecology depart-
ment, spoke to the first meeting of
the Michigan Cancer Conference
at Lansing.
* * *
"DEATH FROM the more com-
mon cancers can be reduced ten
times. To deal cancer such a tell-
ing blow, however, can only be
accomplished by the combined ef-
fort of every organization com-
pletely or even remotely interested
in health matters," Dr. Miller
said.
"Today we recognize cancer
as something more than a med-
ical problem. It is also a social,
an economic and an educational
problem."
As chairman of the conference,
Dr. Miller spoke to more than 100
delegates fitom state-wide medical,
dental, nursing and lay organiza-
tions. The conference was called to
discuss a statewide cancer detec-
tion program.
* * *
DR. MILLER outlined a pro-
gram top rovide "periodic health
examinations for every adult in
Michigan at reasonable cost" so
that cancer may be detected at a
curable stage.
To accomplish this program, Dr.
Miller urged the representatives of
the various organizations attend-
ing the conference to encourage
periodic individual checkups, make
cancer detection a part of every
regular examinatioan and assist in
a local cancer detection program
in each community.
Bus.Ad. School
Holds Elections
The School of Business Admin-
istration will hold elections from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. today.
Seniors and graduate students
will vote for a senior class presi-
dent, and all business students will
vote for six new members of the
Business Administration Council.
Candidates for senior president
are Jack Edmon, Peter S. Logothe-
tis, and Doren Russler. The
runner-up in this election will be-
come secretary-treasurer of the
senior class.
Students running for the coun-
cil are Lillian Bartlett, S. P. Baye-
kin, J. Donaruk, William Bristor,
Donald Cecil, James E. Colovin, G.
A. Darrow, Al Garchow, Ann Holz-
hauer, John Jacobs, John L. Mc-
Carthy, Morris H. Passer, and
Donald Wolf.
Students who intend to vote
must present their cashier's re-
ceipts.

RECEIVING SCHOLARSHIPS-Three outstanding University
engineering students receive $500 John Morse Memorial Founda-
tion scholarships from Dean Ivan C. Crawford of the College of
Engineering. Standing left to right are Dean Crawford, Colonel
Henry W. Miller, chairman of the engineering scholarships com-
mittee, Jack K. Zimmerman, Paul A. Fromm, and Allan H.
Outzs.
4 * * *
Three Student Engineers
Get Morse Scholarships

(Continued from Page 1)
fing, a firm vigorous American
foreign policy must be evolved,
one which all European nations
can subscribe.
The rearmament of western Eu-
rope and the strengthening of ties
between nations in the Atlantic
pact must be tightened.
TO GAIN FAITH, the United
States must remove from its life
the contradictions to the demo-
cratic idea, including racial in-
equality, which was perhaps the
first point Europeans would at-
tempt to discuss with us.
The occupation oi: Germany
Inter-Guild's
Workshop Set
For Saturday
An Inter-Guild workshop for the
12 student church guilds on cam-
pus will be held from 2:30-5 p.m.
Saturday at Lane Hall.
Barbara Abar, chairman of the
program committee which organ-
ized the meeting, said the work-
shop is planned, primarily for the
exchange of ideas and techniques
for better guild programs.
*I * *
EACH GUILD will give a skit
portraying a distinctive part of its
program. Nine committee chair-
men from each guild will discuss
their committees.
Committees are program, so-
cial action, foreign students,
worship, president and inter-
guild representatives, recreation,
personnel, publicity and com-
missary.
Refreshments will be served. The
meeting is open to the public.

1'

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was a mess, and only a policy of
strong mindedness and devotion
to principles can eradicate the
errors.
Failure to do so will give tacit
encouragement to the Germans to
continuentheir nationalistic ways,
as evidenced particularly by the
resurgence of a Nazi type press.
* * *
AID TO EUROPE, mainly in the
form of the Marshall Plan, must
continue for some time. Otherwise
communism will have a better
than average chance of gripping
such countries as France and
Italy.
With but two great powers
juggling for world supremacy,
and the forces which produced
the first two world wars still ac-
tive, it is hard to believe after
our talks with Europeans that
another war can be avoided. De-
layed, perhaps, but not avoided.
The great danger is that the
Western Allies, headed by the
United States, will underestimate
their enemies much as the Nazis
did, and lose.
* * *
FOR THIS REASON we have
here presented our conclusions
based on what we saw and heard
last summer. Only a strong and
determined western block can
hope to survive when the war
comes.
Quietly and efficiently, we must
prepare ourselves. Other w ids e,
-ready yourself for a home in a
Ibough with a spear, if you are
around.
PUre-Med Talk
Listed Today
Dr. Wayne L. Whittaker, secre-
tary of the School of Medicine, will
lecture on "Medical School Ad-
missions and Opportunitiesin
Medicine" at 7:30 p.m. in Rm.
1400, New Chemistry Building.
The lecture is sponsored by the
Pre-Med Society. Non-members
may attend.

Scholarships of $500 have been
awarded to three engineering stu-
dents, Dean Ivan C. Crawford, of
the College of Engineering, an-
nounced yesterday.
Paul K. Fromm, '51E, of Chi-
cago, Jack K. Zimmerman, '51E,
of Saginaw, and Allan H. Outzs,
'51E, of Parma, Ohio, are the
scholarship winners.
THE AWARDS were presented on
behalf of the John Morse Me-
morial Foundation by Dean Craw-
ford and Colonel Henry V. Miller,
chairman of the Engineering
Scholarships Committee. They
were the first given University
students by the foundation.
Beginning next September,
there will be six such scholar-
ships available, according to
Dean Crawford.
The present winners who main-
tai an outstanding record will be
eligible for three of them, while
the other three will be available
to students outstanding in their
sophomore year.
THE FOUNDATION was estab-
lished by Robert H. Morse in mem-
ory of his son, to create or aid
"charitable, benevolent, scientific,
religious, literary and educational
enterprises."

To date it has been mainly
active in giving scholarships to
honor students in engineering
colleges.
Such awards have been estab-'
lished at the University of Wis-
consin, Purdue University, North-
western University, and the Illi-
nois Institute of Technology, as
well as Michigan.
Miller Will Open
J ournalismn Talks
Floyd J. Miller, publisher of the
Royal Oak Daily Tribune, will
open the third annual series of
University journalismlectures at
3 p.m. today in Rm E, Haven Hall.
His subject will be, "Report on
the Inter-American Press Congress
of 1949." An informal coffee hour
will follow the lecture.
All journalism students as well
as other interested students may
attend.

'U Scientists
Study Upper
Atmosphere
University scientists at the En-
gineering Research Institute have
succeeded in collecting samples of
the earth's atmosphere well over
40 miles up.
This is the first time a sample
has been collected above 100,000
feet, according to Leslie M. Jones,
supervisor of the Army Signal
Corps program here investigating
meteorological phenomena at high
altitudes.
S * * *
V-2 AND AEROBEE rockets
fired at White Sands, New Mexico
carry special steel bottles aloft.
The bottle installations were de-
signed by Norman J. Wenk, and
are prepared in the Institute's
laboratories. They are fitted witlf
a mechanism which opens them 80
second after launching - about
40 miles up, Jones revealed.
After a few seconds the intake
tube of the bottle is pinched to-
gether and a small charge of
powder ignites, melting a solder
covering and sealing the tube.
Elton A. Wenzel opens the bot-
tles, and he and Prof. F. A. Pan-
eth in England, who did the origi-
nal analyses, examine the samples.
Analyses thus far indicate that
the atmosphere up to 40 miles has
the some relative proportion of
gases as at groufid level.
The data will aid in determining
the temperature and density of
high altitude air, and will be used
in studying rocket design and
weather, Jones said.
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