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October 11, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sir

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1949

Union Coffee
Hour Set for
Tomorrow
Have you ever longed for a
chance to ask your professor just
why your class is run as it is?
If this desire has ever possessed
you, the Union has just what you
need.
A SERIES of informal student-
faculty coffee hours will be inaug-
urated at 4 p.m. tomorrow when
students and faculty from the
English department will meet over
cups of coffee in the Union's Ter-
1ace Room..
These coffee hours are spon-
sored by the Union in an effort
to enable students and faculty
members to become acquainted
on an informal basis.
With hot coffee to warm up the
conversation, the Union hopes that
students and their professors can
consider their mutual problems in
a friendly atmosphere.
OCCASIONALLY, distinguished
visiting speakers meet with stu-
dents and faculty at these coffee
hours. Last year, former Senator
and OPA director Prentiss M.
Brown was honored at one of the
political science department get-
togethers.
During the course of the year
many departments will be fea-
tured at the Wednesday afternoon
Terrace Room events. Announce-
ments of the dates of these in-
formal conversation sessions will
be made on bulletin boards, in The
Daily and in classes.
Courses Held
By Telephone
The University of Illinois last
night presented the first of it
monthly series of postgraduate
courses in dentistry by telephone
. Entitled "Recent Advances in
the Control of Dental Decay," the
transmission reached 142 dental
societies in 39 states, the District
of Columbia and Canada.
The faculty for the series is
comprised of more than 30 dental
specialists throughout the country.
It includes Dr. Philip Jay of the
University dental school, who dis-
cussed on yesterday's program the
dietary aspects of tooth decay.
This system of transmission by
telephone enables dentists in iso-
lated communities to become
quickly acquainted with the cur-
rent advances in dentistry, Illinois
officials commented.
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Pcrtable Models
of all makes
Sold,
Bought,
Repaired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. I. Requisitions Accepted
MORRILL'S
314 South State St.

GOTHIC SOCIETY PL.ANS:
Film Club To Prese 1 Movie Classics

i

Such film classics as "The Cabi-
net of Dr. Caligari," "M," and
"Grand Illusion" will be shown in
Ann Arbor this winter.
Sponsoring the program is the
newly-formed Michigan Gothic
Film Society, a group founded -
according to President W. J.
Hampton - to enable students to
study and discuss the "significant"
pictures of the past.
FIRST MEETING of the society
will be held Monday night. "The
society will meet once a month,"
Hampton said, 'for the purpose of
seeing films and holding brief dis-
cussion sessions."
He announced that guest
speakers, chosen from students
and faculty, have been invited to
address the group on certain as-
pects of the viewed films.
Membership fee has been offi-
cially set at $3.50 per member, to

cover the co:s of cut:-lI and +
ation, Hampton said.

oiper-

"WE H-OPE," lhe added. ,to ofe
bonus filmstolie10nbe5if theh3
numnu rber ofi icn~ ~is arge,
enough to x i P
SCtrd, Uti : I~L bte G: il i.&~
for t1t..'l, ILLIa tiut feclaed. 1
Requests for m~ember.,hip should
be addr'esse'd to dgaor XW. Whan.;
treasurer, 1 234 Maldem Court, Vit-;

low Run Village, no later than Fri-
day, he noted.
THE CLUB, sponsored by fac-
ulty members and graduate stu-
dents, has found it possible to ac-
cept a limited number of under-
graduate members, he announced.;
"Hollywood is all right," Hamp-
ton said, "but everyone needs a
change now and then. That's what
we're doing our best to give stu-
dents of the cinema in this organi-
zation."

BRIT'ISH Z

SLASHED

4

TEMPORARY LOW PRICES ON

NAVY MAN OUSTED-Captain
James G. Crommelin brought his
discharge on himself when he
charged that the Navy's attack
force was being "nibbled to
death." His complaints helped
bring about a thorough Con-
gressional investigation of Navy
complaints.

ALL PARTS OPEN:
Last Tryouts for 'Go den
Boy, Scheduled Today

Sv T e an Money
nWashdays
athe
Longer leisure
Automatic washing machines
Useful time added to wash day
No waiting, if call for appointments
Dryers available
Relax while your washing is done
Only 25c a load
Mkes clothes cleaner than ever
Air conditioned
Takes only one half hour
HALF-HOUR LAUNDRY

Student Players will hold their
final tryouts for "Golden Boy" at
7:30 p.m. today in the League.
The meeting is open to all those
interested in stage crew, costum-
ing, make-up, and publicity, as
well as acting, according to Mike
Cetta; director of the play. All
parts are open, he said.
* * *
"GOLDEN BOY" is the story of
Joe Bonaparte, an Italian youth
who has great talent as a violinist.
His ambition to be "somebody"
drives him into the prizefighting
name.
Packed with indecision and
afraid of ruining his hands, Joe
degenerates into a commodity
SRA Issues
Volunteer Call
Peggy Booth, '50, chairman of
the Student Religious Association
community service committee, has
announced that volunteers for
community service projects will be
interviewed from 12:30 to 1 p.m.
and 5:15 to 5:45 p.m. today
through Friday at Lane Hall.
Volunteers are needed for reg-
ular weekly jobs and emergency
work at the Michigan Childrens'
Institute, Dunbar Center and Uni-
versity Hospital, Miss Booth said.
Today's
Programs
Drama-8 p.m. Angell Hall
players-Tennyson's "Idylls of the
King," adapted for radio by Jac-
queline Gabouri (part One),
WHRV, WUOM-FM.
Comedy-9 p.m. - Bob Hope
Show-WWJ.
9:30 p.m. Life with Luigi-WJR.
Forum-American Town Meet-
ing-WHRV.

of the men who manage him.
When he accidentally kills his
ring opponent, he realizes his mis-
take, but the condition of his
hands prevents his return to the
violin.
* * *
THE DRAMA, written by Clif-
ford Odets, is full of pungent dia-
logue and choice character parts.
The leading role is Joe, the cross-
eyed, spiritually tormented "golden
boy."
Tom Moody is his explosive,
but boyish manager. Lorna
Moon, Moody's girl, appears
tough and practical, but she is
actually a pathetic "lost" figure
with a softer heart than she
cares to reveal.
Joe's father is a gentle-man-
nered, bewildered old-world par-
ent, willing to sacrifice all for his
son's career as a musician. Mr.
Carp, a Jewish storekeeper, spends
many, quiet hours with old Mr.
Bonaparte, commenting on the
ironies of life.
May Cut Jhet
Cost-Freeman
Research is leading to a reduc-
tion of the critical and 'expensive
materials used in the "super-
alloys'" necessary for jet aircraft
engine production, according to
Prof. James W. Freeman of the
engineering school.
Prof. Freeman discussed "Super
Creep-Resistant Alloys" at the
First Pacific Area National Meet-
ing of the American Society for
Testing Materials, in San Fran-
cisco yesterday.
The "super-alloys" are the ma-
terials which have made the jet
engine a successful power plant
for aircraft, he said.
Experiments have revealed a
great number of undeveloped
alloys which exhibit better prop-
erties than many in use, Prof.
Freeman said.

Come In and Make Arrangements

I

HOBBY

Phone 2-0035

514-16 E. William

510 East Williams

Phone 5540

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pp'

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1i

FEBRUARY
JUNE
and
AUGUST
Graduates

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YV ^ :,.
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Get in the picture!!
Make Your Appointments for your

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