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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1949 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

't12IMUljttItANIJAIAY

UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE - "CLINIC AND HOSPITAL"
e e ee * * * *
Health Service Cares for 'U tudents

G-

If this is your first semester on
campus, you're probably wonder-
ing. "What do I do if I get sick
while away from home?"
Providing treatment and care
for ill students as well as looking
after the health of Michigan's
20,000 students is the job of the
University Health Service.
BEFORE A STUDENT can reg-
ister for the first time at the Uni-
versity, .he or she must receive a
thorough physical examination,
usually lasting about two hours.
X-rays are also taken to check for
tuberculosis.
Records are made of any de-
fects in posture, of past illnesses
and minor complaints. But it is
entirely up to the student
whether or not he takes ad-
-vantage of Health Service fa-
cilities
Each student is assigned to
physician medical' adviser whom
he may feel free to call on for
advice or treatment of a cold,
headache or minor symptoms.
* * *
IF THE SERVICES of a spe-
cialist are required, the student

will be referred to one of the
Health Service's specially equipped
departments such as Allergy, Der-
matology, Eye, Nose and Throat,
Surgery, Dentistry, Physio-Ther-
apy, or Mental Hygiene.
Besides general physicians,
the Health Service maintains a
full staff of qualified specialists.
The facilities of a Laboratory
and Pharmacy are also avail-
able.
Student patients are never used
as clinical subjects for medical
student instruction or experimen-
tation.
** *
A 60-BED INFIRMARY is lo-
cated on the third floor of the
Health Service. However, Dr. War-
ren E. Forsythe, director of the
Service, pointed out that it is sel-
dom that more than half the beds
are -used at any one time.
Cases that cannot be handled
by the Health Service are gener-
ally referred to the 1,029-bed Uni-
versity Hospital. In cases of seri-
ous illness parents are notified by
special delivery letters.
* * *
ALL individual student health

records are confidential and are
not released to anyone, including
University officials, without the
student's permission.
In general, ,complete free
medical care is available to stu-
dents. However, charges are
made for special nursing, tests
for glasses, glasses, some drugs,
outside room calls, non-emer-
gency operation and other elec-
tive services.
In the "good old days" when a
student became ill in his room, his
roommate usually provided all the
medical. and nursing attention
which he might receive.
* * *
IF THINGS GOT BAD, the
roommate usually put his buddy
on a train and sent him home.
If someone came down with a
contagious disease and an epi-
demic developed, the college us-
u4lly declared an unexpected
two-week holiday. No students,
no epidemic. '
The first University Health
Service was organized in 1913. It
was staffed by three physicians, a
nurse, a clerk, and had a budget
of $10,00 with which to assist the
University's 5,520 students.
Today, the Health Service oc-
cupies a three-story building
(built in 1939) with a staff of
100. Yearly expenditures amount
to about $340,000.
old Roots
HADASHVILLE, Manitoba -
Gold-bearing rock formations lo-
cated in southeastern Manitoba
constituteutheaworld's oldest known
belt of volcanic rocks, according
to geologists.
The formation consists of the
roots of an ancient mountain
range eroded away millions of
years ago.

Blood Bank
Has Valuable
Transfusions
815 a Pint Paid
Student Donors
There's a bank down at the
University Hospital.
But unlike most banks, this or-
ganization deals with a substance
far more valuable and precious
than money-Blood.
THE BLOOD BANK is a system
through which a person in need
of a transfusion can obtain whole
blood by borrowing the required
amount from a "storage vault" at
the Hospital,
Dr. Otto T. Mallery, who is
in charge of the Hospital's Blood
Bank, explained that blood tak-
en from the Bank must be re-
placed in one of three ways:
First, the patient may have his
friends or relatives donate blood
to replace the amount that he has
used.
BUT IF THE patient does not
have anyone who is able to make
a donation, he may turn to one
of the many church, social or fra-
ternal groups which make volun-
teer deposits to help supply ever
increasing blood needs.
The third way of retiring the
loan is by buying blood which
is replaced by professional don-
ors obtained by the Hospital.
In this case the patient is
charged at the same rate as
the Hospital must pay the
donor.
Dr. Mallery said that profes-
sional donors must be used to
pick up the places of slack when
deposits are low and also to re-
place rare blood types.
FOR THIS PURPOSE, the Hos-
pital relies on the contributions of
from 300 to 500 students a month.
However, the greater portion of
blood is supplied by volunteer do-
nations from friends and rela-
tives of patients.
Students, and others who wish
to become donors are given a
physical examination and a
asmple of their blood is taken.
They must be between the ages
of 21 and 50 (parental consent is
needed for those between 18 and
20) and in good health. Persons
suffering from allergy, headcold,
anemia or have had malaria or
any defect which can be trans-
mitted through the blood are not
accepted.
DR. MALLERY suggested that
those interested in becoming don-
ors call 2-2521, Ex. 225 for an ap-
pointment.
The current price of whole blood
is $15 a pint.

University's Forward Wall---the Administration

JAMES P. ADAMS ALEXANDER G. RUTHVEN
... provost . .. president
* ** * * *

MARVIN L. NIEHUSS
... vice president
** *

Ruthven, Adams, Niehuss, Briggs Run Institution
*) 4)

Responsibility for running the
University rests upon the shoul-
ders of a quartet of 'experienced
men-all alumni of the institution
they operate.
The top-ranking administrators
include President Alexander -G.
Ruthven, Provost James P. Adams,
and Vice-Presidents Marvin L.
Niehuss and Robert P. Briggs.
* * *
BEFORE ASSUMING the pres-
idency of the University, Dr. Ruth-
ven distinguished himself as a
zoologist and as director of the
University Museums for many
years.
P . D Ruthven received his
Ph.D. degree from the Univer-
sity in 1906, and has been a
member of its faculty ever since.
He rose through the ranks
in the zoology department, be-
ginning as an instructor in 1906
and becoming chairman of the
department in 1927.
From 1913 until 1929 he served
as director of the Museum of
Zoology. This position served as
a springboardto his appointment
as Director of University Museums
in 1922. He kept this post until
1936.
In 1928, Dr. Ruthven served as
Dean of Administration, and in
Try FOLLETT'S First
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1929 he was chosen to head the
University as its sixth president.
* * *
PROVOST Adams received his
AB degree from the University in
1919 and his master's degree here
in 1921. In the same year he
joined the staff of Brown Univer-
sity as an assistant professor of
economic's. He subsequently be-
came chairmai of Brown's eco-
nomics department.
He became vice-president of
Browns in 1931, a position which
he held until 1944. During the
first semester of the 1936-37
academic year he served as
Brown's acting president.
He returned to the University
in 1945 as provost. As provost, he
serves as the president's admin-
istrative assistant - his "execu-
tive officer."
Besides his work in educational
institutions, Provost Adams has
taken an active interest in public
affairs. He has served as arbitrat-
II, - 5

er for labor disputes, and as a
member of various welfare or-
ganizations.
* * *
A NATIVE OF Louisville, Ky.,
Vice-President Niehuss received
his AB degree at the University in
1925, and a Bachelor of Laws de-
gree in 1930. While still in Law
School, Niehuss served as an in-
structor of economics in the
School of Business Administration.
He has been associated with
the University most of the time
since, as an instructor and pro-
fessor of law, and since 1944 as
Vice-President.
,During the war, he directed the
University's Division for Emer-
gency Training, which worked

with the Navy V-12 and the Army
ASTP programs on campus.
AFTER GRADUATING from
the University in 1925, Vice-Pres-
itlent Briggs was professor and
then dean in the business admin-
istration school of Kansas Wes-
leyan University until 1927.
He joined the University's fac-
ulty in that year, andsinee then
has served as professor of ac-
counting and economics.
A distinguished accountant,
Briggs did much accounting work
for governmental agencies during
the war years.
He became a University Vice-
President in 1945.

ET TU, YOU BRUTE:
Draft Registration Continues

Rgistration under the selective
Service Act is still required despite
the extended draft holiday, draft
board officals announced.
E Registration requirements that
were not clearly understood by the
public were clarified by Colonel
Glenn B. Arnold, Michgan State
director of selective service.
EVERY MALE between the ages
of 18 and 26, regardless of citizen-
ship, is requred to register, with
the only exceptions of members of
the armed forces and certain
aliens.
The Colonel pointed out that
the local board must be kept
informed of any change in ad-
dress or status even after the
registrant passes his 26th birth-
day.
Men who were on active duty in
the armed forces and who did not
register durng the registration
period last September are required
to do so within 30 days of their
discharge.
NON-CITIZENS entering the
United States for the first time
must register with a local board

within six months .following their
arrival in this country, he added.
A person who reaches the age
of 18 is required to register at
his nearet draft board within
five days of h birthday.
The Colonel emphasized that
the maximum penalty for viola-
tion of the Selective Service Act
is five years in prison or a fine
of $10,000 or both.

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