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October 07, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1949

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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TELESCOPE ADDITION:
'U' Astronomers in South Africa Scan Milky Way

m

By LEN GREENBAUM
In the heart of South Africa,
amidst its veld lands and wild
beasts, the University's Astronomy
Department in conjunction with
the Mount Wilson Observatory is
completing its survey of the
Milky Way.
Begun several years ago at
Mount Wilson, the experiment was
shifted to Bloemfontein, Orange
Free State, in order to photograph
that portion of the Milky Way
not visible in the Northern Hemi-
sphere.
A NEW CAMERA house was
built alongside the University's
Lamont-Hussey Observatory to
accommodate the 10-inch prisma-
"tic camera shipped from Mount
Wilson.
Karl Henize, a graduate of
the University, has been photo-
graphing the galaxy 4since last
spring. The complete results of
the survey, however, will not be
determined for at least three
years.
Through this survey astrono-
mers hope to discover the secrets
of Be stars and planetary nebu-
lae.
* * *
IT IS BELIEVED that answers
to important physics problems, in-
cluding the origin of high veloci-
ties and a possible. relationship to
nuclear physics can be found in

AFRICAN OBSERVATORY--Zebras stroll past the University's Lamont-Hussey Observatory at
Bloemfontein, Orange Free State,.South Africa. To the left is the camera house recently completed
for current survey of the Milky Way, being carried on by the University's Astronomy department
and the Mount Wilson Observatdry. The prismatic camera can be seen protruding through the
sliding roof of the house.

the mysterious changes of these
objects.
The project is under the direc-
torship of Prof. Goldberg, head of
the astronomy department

Nelson Eddy, Famous Baritone
To OpenExtra Concert Series

Students and professors alike will enjoy flying with us.
THE BEST IN FLIGHT EQUIPMENT USED.
Learning to fly is part of a modern Education.
G. L. Flight Training, Still Available
GRIDLEY AIRPORT
Located on U.S. 23 at the Expressway
C.A.A. Approved School No. 6066
Phone Ypsi 9272 - No toll charge.

Nelson Eddy, famous baritone of
screen, concert stage and radio,
will open the Choral Union Extra
Concert Series 7 p.m., Sunday, in
Hill Auditorium.
Eddy,dknown to most people for
his performances on the radio and
in the movies, actually got his
singing start in opera as Amonasro
in Verdi's "Aida." He won his role
with the Philadelphia Operatic So-
ciety as the result of a city-wide
competition of singers.
HIS DEBUT in professional
opera came later in 1924, when
he sang the role of Tonio, in "Pag-
liacci," in the Philadelphia Civic
Opera Company's Metropolitan
Opera House production.
While with the company, Eddy
was given serious operatic coach-
ing by Alexander Smallens, then

In Football
It's MC I
In Yearbooks

director of the Company. Under
Smallens, Eddy developed a
repertoire of 28 operatic roles.
Several years later, motion pic-
ture scouts heard him sing at the
Philharmonic Auditorium in Los
Angeles, and he was signed to do
the picture that made him nation-
ally famous, "Naughty Marietta."
Eddy then went on from his suc-
cess in the movies to become a
star on the radio, having his own
show on many occasions.
During the war, Eddy, and his
accompanist, Theodore Paxton,
toured the USO circuit, entertain-
ing men in army camps in Brazil,
Africa. Arabia, Egypt and Persia.
Tickets for the Sunday concert
can be purchased at the Choral
Union office in Burton Tower.
Dormitory News
EDITORS NOTE: Contributors to
What's Up Ini The Dorms should
contact Martha Bazar at the Daily
or 4007 Hinsdale House.
In order to encourage new
friendships as well as new text
books, the residence halls again
launched their social programs on
a note of 'boy meets girl'.
Heading its list of events, Vic-
tor Vaughan has invited Mary
Louise Hinsdale and Carolyn Hub-
bard Klienstuck (alias units 3
and 4 of the new dorm) to an open
house, tonight.
MOSHER will also lay out the
welcome mat for Tyler House and
Lloyd House,
Post Army game gatherings
will be held by Newberry and
Barbour.
The new officers for Hayden
House are Roger Roemisch, Presi-
dent; Al Grybas, Vice President;
Dick Pearson, East Quad Repre-
sentative; Al English, Social
Chairman; John Biery, Athletic
Chairman; Paul Marsh, Secretary
Treasurer; Glenn Guthrie, Publi-
city Chairman and Dave Klaus,
Scholastic Chairman.
THE FIRST edition of the Hay-
den Howl hit the streets earlier
this week, and many other resi-
dence halls are planning similar
publications. The New Dorm is
threatening to call its The
Lampost.
Ann Konkar has been elected
Vice President of Hinsdale House.
Jane Fest is President, Jean Ham-
by-Secretary, Ina Sussman-So-
cial Chairman and Dorothy Kline
is in charge of publicity.

Students Eat
Steaks for
r Cents
Paris Cafe Life
Gay, Easy-Going1
(continued from Page 1)
the fact that we didn't have a res-
ervation.
* * *
BUT WE WERE leaving Paris
the following day and we couldn't
"leave without eating there."
We asked to see the manager.
When we stepped off the eleva-
tor into the restaurant and
caught a. glimpse of the rich
simple setting we used our char-
acteristic American bazeness
and asked for our reservation.
The ruse succeeded. The Tour
d'Argent is too fine a place to ac-
cuse a potential patron of being a
liar.
WE HAD TO wait a short time,
but it was well worth it.
Delightful music played from
some remote source, loud enough
to make you aware it was there,
soft enough not to be distract-
ing. Waiters flocked around us
like an army of attendants.
The food was superb, consisting
of innumerable courses from
chilled cantaloupe for an appetiz-
er to soup, fish, pressed duck
which is the house's specialty, a
half dozen side dishes, salad and
crepe suzettes for dessert.
THE MEAL WAS served by
three waiters. Two wine stewards
poured the sparkiing beverage
everytime our glasses were emp-
tied. A fourth waiter fried the
crepe suzettes in brandy and
served the steaming delicacy. This
was French service at its best.
The complete dinner took us
more than two hours to con-
sume. Yet, we never felt over-
stuffed or were eager for the
meal to terminate.
When the time came to pay our
bill-which amounted to close to
15 dollars a piece-it didn't hurt
us in the least bit to part with that
fantastic sum.
WE HAD EATEN at the Tour
d'Argent and it had been food like
nothing we had ever tasted. -
Memil's was all right for every
day and for that peculiar life and
color that is typically Paris, but
the Tour d'Argent is Paris too, the
other side, and it was fine for once
in a while.
CED Holds Meet
Today at Union
An organizational meeting of
the Committee to End Discrimina-
tion will be held in the Union at
4:15 p.m. today.
Representatives of any organi-
zation and any interested students
will be welcome in the committee
which is devoted to removing dis-
criminatory questions from Uni-
versity application blanks, accord-
ing to Leon Rechtman, chairman.
Call to Travelers
Students who travelled abroad
last summer but who were not able
to attend the NSA travelers' meet-
ing Tuesday may contact Dori-
anne Zipperstein at Newberry Hall
by phone or post card.
Miss Zipperstein asked students
to turn in their name, address,
phone number, countries visited
and the sponsor under which they

I traveled.I

Inter-Arts Unimon
Wants Tryouts
Inter-Arts Union will continue was formed to encompass the in-
its tryouts for "M'urder in the terests of students in creative
Cathedral" at 7:30 p. m. today in writing, dramatics, architecture
Rm. 240 Temporary Classroom college, music school, moderr
Building. dance and ballet.
The newly formed campus * * *
group, which represents students THE INITIAL project of th
in the creative arts, is planning a new group was a Student Art
November production of the T. Festival, presented last May.
S. Eliot drama.
* * * This year Inter-Arts Union
"MURDER in the Cathedral" Plans to sponsor a dance group,
tells the story of Thomas f. musical programs, shows of stu-
Becket's martyrdom. Inter-Arts dent paintings and a quarterly
Union hopes to stage it in a local arts magazine, as well as an-
church, according to Strowan other masquerade ball and arts
Robertson, Grad., director of the festival, Robertson said.
play. Inter-Arts Union has the sup
Robertson has previously di- port of the English and speech de
rected Eliot's Sweeney Agonis- partmentsmin its presentation o
tes" for the speech department. "Murder in the Cathedral," Rob
Musicfor "Murder in the Cathe- ertson explained.
dral" will be written by Ed Chuda- * * .
coff, '49SM, who composed the in- PROF. Norman E. Nelson of th
cidental music in "Dr. Faustus," English department praised th
presented by the speech depart- group for taking "a significan
ment last year. step. The play is striking both in
form and ideas, the kind of pro
MURRAY GITLIN, '50, will exe- duction the University ' should
cute the play's choreography. Stu- have a chance to experience," h
dents from the modern dance dechare.
group will take part in the drama. Tryouts for the play should
The organizationof Inter- bring their own copies for the
Arts Union resulted from a. re- present, Robertson said. 'He also
vival of the Beaux Arts Ball, urged students with experience in
sponsored last November as dance to read for parts.
"Masquerade of the Heads" by _____________
several of the arts groups on
campus.
In January a permanent society

Expect 'Guilty'
Judgment in
N.Y. Red Trial
(Continued from Page 1)
Included in this list are the
"Conmmunist Manifesto," Len-
in's "Imperialism" and "State
Revolution," and Stalin's "Foun-
dations of Lenin" and "Prob-
lems of Leninism."
Pickets still appear sporadically
in Foley Square, a miniature park
directly across from the Federal
Court Building, protesting one or
another aspect of the trial.
They have been especially
prominent on days following a rul-
ing of contempt of court by Judge
Harold Medina against a defend-
ant or lawyer.
Defense lawyers are convinced
that, apart from the unconstitu-
tionality of the Smith Act (which
is the basis for the Grand Jury in-
dictment on which the case is be-
ing tried), the record is shot
through with reversible error.
* * *
SO THEIR plans are for a con-
viction now, followed by a rever-
sal .by the Supreme Court.
Part of the appeal for a re-
versal is expected to rest on de-
fense evidence to prove that
Russell Janney, one of the jur-
ors, was not qualified to serve
on the jury.
Defense motions have been en-
tered, and refused, to have Jan-
ney dismissed from the jury, on
the grounds that a speech he
made in Macon, Ga. on cpmmu-
nism proves that he was prej-
udiced against the defendants at
the time he was called for jury
duty.
To back this charge, the defense
refers to an article in the Macon
"Telegraph" quoting Janney as
saying he was for "a war to the
death against communism."

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THE MICHIGAN .
GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
a non-profit film study group
offers
A FILM STUDY SERIES
for 1949-50:

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Appointments NOW
Being Taken
SENIOR and
GRADUATE Pictures

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Prints Available
Fifteen prints are still available
to students at the Student Loan
Print Library, 508 Administration.
Nearly all religious reproduc-
tions, the remaining prints may
all be picked up from 9 to 5 p.m.
today. A 50-cent rental fee is
charged for the semester.
FOLLOW THE TREND TO
HEINE'S BLEND
THE SMOKING TOBACCO WITH A
B.L"-DEGREE!
*Bites Less!
L *
SeNrO,
j.
j
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PROGRAM SCHEDULE
October 17, 1949
DON JUAN'S WEDDING
PRIMITIVE GERMAN FILMS
MISUNDERSTOOD
THE GOLEM
THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI
November 21, 1949
VARIETY
GHOSTS BEFORE BREAKFAST
December 8, 1949
~M~
January 16, 1950
FANTOMAS
THE RUNAWAY HORSE
FILMS by LOUIS LUMIERE
THE CRAZY RAY
February 20, 1950
RIEN QUE LES HEURES
FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER
February 27, 1950
THE ITALIAN STRAW HAT
March 27, 1950
THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC
April 17, 1950
A NOUS LA LIBERTE
May 15, 1950
f/ Mt 15, 10

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