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October 06, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1949-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rITHE MICHIGAN DAILY

ATELINE-EUROPE:
U' Students Stirred by Paris

(EDITOR'S NOTE: 'This is the
seventh in a series of articles by
two Daily staff members who spent
the summer in Europe as leaders
of an NSA study tour.)
By BARNEY and DOLORES
LASCIHEVER
Paris is still the main show onl
Europe's midway of tourist attrac-
tions.
Boasting of all the advantages
of New York and little of its ugli-
ness, Paris stirs the imagination
like no other city we visited.
* * *
THOUGH OUR STAY was
short we managed in turn to taste
the flavor of the multitude of out-
door cafes-a most civilized insti-
tution, the broad avenues, the mu-
seums and historical buildings, the
student centers and the quaintness
of the new postwar Bohemian vil-
lage in the St. Germain de Pres
district.
Of all these, perhaps the out-
door cafe was the most satisfy-
ing delight :of all.
In opposition to the standard
American creed of always 'doing"
something, the Frenchman loves
nothing better than to spend a
quiet hour or so leisurely contem-
plating life from his vantage point
at an outdoor table.
IT WAS a contagious habit. And
we felt we came closer to absorb-
ing the spirit of the great city this
way than in any other manner.
Little need be said of the fa-
miliar landmarks of Paris: the
mighty Arch of Triumph which
strides the beautiful Champs
Elyes .s, the Louvre with its
Mona Lisa and Winged Victory,
the Eiffel Tower and the tomb
of Napoleon. They are there, and
they must be seen.
But more important, we felt,
were such intangibles as French
graciousness and manners, and
certainly French humor.
* * *
AT AN OFFICIAL reception in
a great, ornate, gilded room in the
Paris city hall we encountered a
real grain of the French spice of
life.
We were comfortably seated
and a stern, black frocked of-
ficial began his welcoming
speech. A moment later, the
chair under a girl in the front
row collapsed. We could not re-
stralin our laughter.
Volubly apologizing, the official
picked up the unfortunate lady
and with a great bow, presented
her with a bottli of rare perfume
to assuage her embarrassment.
IT TOOK SOME moments for
us to realize that the entire inci-
dent had been framed, and that

* * * *

Candidates
For Rhodes
MeetToday
Men students interested in can-
didacy for the 1950 Rhodes Schol-
arships will meet at 4:15 p. m. to-
day in Rm. 2013 Angell Hall to
discuss requirements and proce-
dures for the awards.
The scholarships, providing two
yeai's of study at Oxford Univer-
sity, are open to unmarried male
citizens between the ages of 19
and 25 years, with at least junior
standing in college. Five years'
residence in the United States is
also required.
PROF. Clark Hopkins, chairman
of the University Rhodes Scholar-
ship Committee, emphasized the
fact that the scholarship insures
sufficient funds to finance the
student's stay abroad.
The basic value of a Rhodes
Scholarship is 404 pounds a
year; at present, however, it
has been supplemented by a
special allowance of 100 pounds
per year.
In addition to this stipend,
those who are eligible may also
draw on the educational benefits
authorized under the G. I. Bill.
A total of 32 such scholarships
will be awarded in the United
States as a whole, four being
awarded from the -district includ-
ing Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois,
Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky.

Post Of fice Erection To Begin
Construction work on the South
University post office branch will 20-man wrecking crew finished
begin Monday, a spokesman for razing the former private home
the George Walterhouse Construc- at 615-617 So. University, site of
tion Co. announced yesterday. the new substation. Workmen were
The local organization was unable to launch operations dur-
awarded the contract early yes- ing the summer because of a Sept.
terday afternoon at a low bid of 1 lease held by the family.
$115,000. Six other companies were A two-story affair, the struc-
competing for the job, the spokes- ture will house post office rooms
man said. on the ground floor and a suite of
Tuesday after a month's stint, a doctors' offices on the second.
Get Your Tickets Now!!
Two Performances -
7 P.M. and 9:30 P.M.
Tuesday, October 18
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor
DANNY KAYE
with
SKITCH HENDERSON < r:
PAGE CAVANAUGH TRIO
DOROTHY DORBEN DANCERS: >?:}
Other Headline Acts!!
Box Office Opens Tomorrow!
Hill Auditorium Box Office open 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. daily.
Tickets: $2.40, $1.80, $1.20. All seats reserved.
Mail orders still accepted.
Send check and self-addressed stamped envelope to
Panhellenic Association, Michigan League, Ann Arbor.
Sponsorship: Panhellenic Association, University of Michigan.
Benefit of the University Fresh Air Camp.

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-Daily--Barney Laschever
PARISIAN LANDMARK-Napoleon's victory monument, the giant
Arch of Triumph, straddles the beautiful Champs Elysees and is
one of the more familiar sights to the thousands of tourists who
flock to the French capital every year.

the city hall reception chairs have
been known to collapse with little
urging.
Turning to another aspect of
Parisian life, we spent an eve-
ning at the Cafe Flore, current
headquarters of the Existential-
ists.
Like a new fad in American jazz,
Existentialism has gripped the
students of Paris and their foreign
compatriots.
SPORTING BEARDS, the fol-
lowers of Sartre, including a good-
ly number of bewhiskered Ameri-
cans, sit around all night intensely
discussing the principles of the
new philosophy.
The morning is reserved for
sleep, the late afternoon for study
or work, and when dark comes, the
all night wrangling begins again.
Politics, too, is a subject for
much talk among the French-
men, young and old. With hard-
ly any agreement on fundamen-
tal political principles, it is lit-
tle wonder that France has so
many political parties.

On only one thing can the
French agree: Germany must not
be allowed to threaten her borders
again.
Today's
Pro grams
DRAMA-8 p.m., "Treasures Off
the Shelf." "The Clumbus
Letter"-WHRV, WUOM-FM.
9 p.m.-"Suspense" "The De-
fense Rests" with Van John-
son-WJR.
10 p.m. Hallmark Playhouse-
National Velvet-WJR.
10:30 p.m.-First Nighter-
Arch Obler's "Lady Doctor"-
WJR.
VARIETY-10 p.m. "Supper Club"
starring Perry Como, Dorothy
Shay, guest.
COMEDY - Duffy's Tavern -
wwJ.

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The piano is out of tune. So we'll chop know how to use machine power to pro- more p
it up. Then we'll get a tin horn instead. duce more goods at lower cost. We have the bet
Sure, these men are crazy. more skilled workers than any other prices,
But.they'ret country. We believe in collective bargain- It's
Butthe'reusing the same kind of think-
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ing a lot of people have been using on theg
American economic system latel.cans save-and our savings go into new any ot
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Our American way isn't perfect. We Because of this, we produce more every
still have our ups and downs of prices and working hour ... and can buy more goods THE
jobs. We'll have to change that. But even with an hour's work than any other
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second-rate substitutes being peddled by We can make the system work even s PU
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It works better because of a few simple to turn out more for every hour we work-- BOk
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PUBLISHED IN THE PUBLiC INTEREST

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